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Old 11-22-2013, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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Okay so my friend has relatives who enjoy old traditional type desserts.

I have been to the U.K., and know a little about Christmas pudding, and its history. (A holly sprig on top?)

My bf's parents also like mincemeat pie- the way it was done in the traditional way. Does anyone know what this is?. I saw Trader Joe's has a mix for it....

any suggestions welcome

Last edited by dreamofmonterey; 11-22-2013 at 05:07 PM..
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Old 11-22-2013, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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some recipes here look unusual, but suet? lol. I thought that was for bird seed.

Traditional Mincemeat Recipe | David Lebovitz
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Old 11-22-2013, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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I love Christmas pudding, Plum pudding, and Mincemeat pie. We don't use suet in ours anymore. The best part is the Bird's Custard that we pour all over the top of the steamed puddings .
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Old 11-23-2013, 05:28 AM
 
Location: Central Midwest
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My Grammie used to make Mince Meat from scratch and it indeed included beef, apples, suet, raisins, sorghum, beef broth and many spices. It was so good. The stuff in a jar is a poor copy of what housewives used to make in my opinion.

Each country has it's own special and traditional Christmas desserts. And some are more savory versus sweet.

I like to have the more traditional American desserts including Pumpkin Pie, Southern Pecan Pie, Apple Pie, Cherry Pie, Date Pudding, Rice Pudding, Bread Pudding, Angel Food Cake, Chocolate Pie, and Iced Sugar Cookies.
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Old 11-23-2013, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Waiting for a streetcar
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Yes, suet is certainly in a traditional mincemeat recipe, and there could very well be lard in the pie dough recipe. Animal fats were available, so you used them in things. In any case, Crosse & Blackwell's Rum & Brandy mincemeat is quite good. Robertson's is reputed to be good as well, but I've never tried it. NoneSuch is simply awful. Crosse & Blackwell's will be hard to find, but upscale and specialty stores should carry it for the holidays or you can always order it from Amazon. Plum pudding with some Wilkinson's hard sauce is also tasty. I don't know about there being any traditional way for mincemeat pie, unless it's to add more liquor. The pie is often given a lattice top crust, but it might come with a full top crust also.

And by the way, I make several batches of bread pudding in the colder months from an old WELSH recipe.
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Old 11-24-2013, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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Crosse & Blackwell sounds interesting.

Thanks. What is hard sauce? Also at an upscale shoppe they had UK desserts and it was called treacle, what is it, a type of pudding?
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Old 11-24-2013, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
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At Mount Vernon Va. they actually make original recipe "Martha Washington's cake" It calls for 40 eggs.

Beautiful looking cake.








Martha Washington's Great Cake | George Washington's Mount Vernon
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Old 11-24-2013, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Waiting for a streetcar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dreamofmonterey View Post
Crosse & Blackwell sounds interesting. Thanks. What is hard sauce? Also at an upscale shoppe they had UK desserts and it was called treacle, what is it, a type of pudding?
C&B make some decent chutney as well and some other products, all of them seemingly of high quality. Hard sauce is essentially butter mixed with brandy and then hardened again. Can't really go wrong with brandy. Treacle is meanwhile a word for any syrup made during the processing of sugar cane or sugar beets. Early in that process, light treacle is formed, later on, dark treacle is formed. Cane syrup is a light treacle. Molasses is a dark treacle. Blackstrap molasses is darker still. In any case, there are indeed various puddings typically made with cane syrup and sponge cake (and perhaps more suet) that are also called treacle.
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Old 11-24-2013, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fairlaker View Post
...Hard sauce is essentially butter mixed with brandy and then hardened again...

...there are indeed various puddings typically made with cane syrup and sponge cake (and perhaps more suet) that are also called treacle.
Hard sauce isn't just butter and brandy - that wouldn't be very good. Ours is butter, sugar, and rum.

Our puddings (desserts) that have the word "treacle" in the name are so named because treacle is one of the primary ingredients - Treacle tart, Treacle pie, Treacle cake, Treacle sponge...
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Old 11-25-2013, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Waiting for a streetcar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Hard sauce isn't just butter and brandy - that wouldn't be very good. Ours is butter, sugar, and rum.
Hard sauce is also marketed (where it is marketed at all) as "brandy butter". A scratch recipe might well include salt and vanilla as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Our puddings (desserts) that have the word "treacle" in the name are so named because treacle is one of the primary ingredients - Treacle tart, Treacle pie, Treacle cake, Treacle sponge...
If it just says Treacle on the label, it is apt to be a puddinglike light treacle and sponge cake product. If it says Spotted Dick on the label, it will still be puddinglike and will still contain light treacle, but it will be different from Treacle, thanks in part to the raisins.
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