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Old 01-10-2014, 05:58 AM
 
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Agree with PP's about using stock, not broth. I use the leftovers from the Costco rotisserie chicken most of the time....
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Old 01-10-2014, 06:00 AM
 
Location: NoVa
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These all sound good. When I make it, I use a large stock pot and throw in a whole chicken, around 3 celery stalks, baby carrots, and some onion. Salt and pepper, poultry seasoning, whatever you like. I let that boil til the chicken is falling off the bones just about and pull the chicken out and let it cool on a platter and then remove all of the meat and put it back into the broth. I bring it back to a boil and toss in the noodles. It always comes out really good.

I like to also add mushrooms but my friend tells me it's not real chicken noodle soup.... lol
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Old 01-10-2014, 06:32 AM
 
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I roast the veggies, and a pound of wings for about 45 minutes. Then, make the stock in my crockpot, let it simmer all day. Strain it, throw the veggies and wings away. Put it in the fridge, strain the fat. Now, I am ready to make soup.

Or, just buy the broth ready made, add your chicken, veggies, I like simple, clear soups, not too much in them. My Grandmother made chicken and dumplings, the stock had a cup of cream added to it.
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Old 01-10-2014, 08:16 AM
 
Location: UP of Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
I like to put in a piece of beef with a bone first, simmer slow for hour or so, then add chicken (with bones), and little later some veggies ( carrots, parsnip, celery root, celery green, leek, parsley, lightly roasted onion for the golden color), then add seasoning: sea salt, freshly crushed black pepper, freshly crushed allspice, bay leaf.
Do not hurry. Simmer slow to get the most of the meat and veggies to the broth.
If you want add noodle or rice, cook them separately.
Hey, this is chicken soup! I raised a hundred chickens last year and since first having my own, its hard to go back to store bought. Home raised are much more flavorful (and work!) The bones and fat, whether beef or chicken is where the flavor is. I break as many of the bones after roasting a whole chicken for the first meal, before they go into the soup pot. Those who have said to forget the processed, fake breasts are giving the best advise.
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Old 01-10-2014, 08:20 AM
 
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Lately I make FANTASTIC soup by using shortcuts: I buy a whole rotisserie chicken from Publix (delicious!) I remove the meat, then put all the skin and bones in Kitchen Basics chicken stock with a few seasonings, chopped onions and bell peppers and also add Great Lakes gelatin for extra creaminess. I cook this down a bit and add the precooked chicken after about an hour (forgot to say I DO remove all the skin and bones first!). It comes out incredible!
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Old 01-10-2014, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Originally Posted by hellpaso View Post
Step away from the chicken breasts. There really is no reason to use them. They are dry & flavorless.
Start with some chicken thighs.

Simmer 4-6 thighs in water or very low sodium broth to cover. If you want to eat it the same day, remove the skin to cut down on the fat. Otherwise, don't worry about it. You can skim off the fat after it is chilled.Use bone-in thighs so you get the flavor & thickening from the bones. You can add bouillon, but I prefer using a tsp or two of low sodium chicken base (like Better than Bouillon brand).Add some cut up carrots, onions, & celery. Add whatever other dry seasonings you want--poultry seasoning, sage, thyme, etc. Let this cook for an hour or so, then remove the chicken & take it off the bone. Add the meat back to your pot, & add some dry noodles--less than you think you'll need. They will increase in size exponentially. If needed, you can supplement the liquid with some more chicken broth or stock. Cook for another half hour or so--taste for seasoning--add salt as needed. Enjoy.
Ok thanks! I'm not really big on white meat anyway. Can chicken wings work too?
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Old 01-10-2014, 11:21 AM
 
Location: NYC
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Originally Posted by kgordeeva View Post
Ok thanks! I'm not really big on white meat anyway. Can chicken wings work too?
Not really chicken wings have more skin than tendons and gelatins. Go and buy one of those Chicken backbone packs in the market. It's essentially the entire back, neck, and thigh bones. Really cheap like $4-5 for a lot of bones, dark meat, and tendons.

You slow cook the chicken until those parts start to melt and become part of the soup then you can add other stuff. Never cook breast or white meat into the soup all they do is become thick and hard.

Take white meat out and cook on the side and add into soup later.

These are my tips, my chicken soup uses a ton of skin, chicken fat is good for you.
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Old 01-10-2014, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DitsyD View Post
You have to have chicken bones & vegetables and make chicken stock to start. THEN you can make good chicken soup. I even cook my chicken bones in store bought chicken broth to up the flavor. Don't overcook the chicken bones though. Simmering for an hour is plenty.
You can simmer them all day and you won't overcook the chicken bones. I simmer for several hours to render the collagen from the skin (yes - make sure you toss-in plenty of the skin) and connective tissue - this won't happen in an hour.

There is a world of difference between a collagen-rich stock and a standard clear stock - in texture and flavor .
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Old 01-10-2014, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Whispering pines, cutler bay FL.
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The only thing different then what I do from most of you all, is that to make the stock I use a gallina (old hen) which has a stronger flavor then the young chicken. Hispanic markets will carry this here in Miami but maybe you can source it from a local farmer. I cook it low and slow most of the day.

I put in onion, a whole head of garlic, bay leaf, peppercorn, thyme, celery, oregano.

Discard the the veggies and this is the base for all sorts of chicken soups, like aqugadito, chicken noodle, or crema the gallina. It provides a rich more intense chicken flavor broth then I if I use a regular chicken. My grandson's other grandma is Peruvian and she taught me that trick.
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Old 01-10-2014, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Chicago - Logan Square
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
You can simmer them all day and you won't overcook the chicken bones. I simmer for several hours to render the collagen from the skin (yes - make sure you toss-in plenty of the skin) and connective tissue - this won't happen in an hour.
Exactly. Another way to do it is to bring the water and bones to a simmer on the stovetop, put a lid on it, and then put in a 190 degree oven for 12-18 hours. After that return it to the stove top, throw in the aromatics (I like carrots, onion, garlic clove, peppercorns, bay leaf and loads of fresh thyme), and simmer for one to two hours. Strain and degrease that, and then add whatever ingredients you want (cook the vegetables in the degreased stock, and add cooked chicken or noodles).

Last edited by Attrill; 01-10-2014 at 02:11 PM..
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