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Old 11-24-2015, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Wisconsin
491 posts, read 243,148 times
Reputation: 1193

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This is the gravy I make after I've prepared the Herb Roasted Turkey (Baked in Oven Cooking Bag), and may I say it's some of "the best" tasting gravy I've ever had. I let the pan drippings sit overnight (in a glass bowl with a lid) in the refrigerator. The next day the fat hardens and comes to the surface of the bowl, which I then scrape it off, and make the gravy. (See *Note before preparing the gravy.)


Turkey Gravy

2 cups turkey drippings
1/8 teaspoon ground white pepper
1/4 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1 teaspoon chicken bouillon granules
1/4 cup flour
1 tablespoon flour
1/2 cup milk

Combine the turkey drippings, pepper, poultry seasoning, and bouillon granules in a 1-quart saucepan; simmer over low heat for 5 minutes.

While the pan drippings and spices are heating, combine the flour (the 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon) along the milk, in a jar with a tight fitting lid; shake until ingredients become smooth.

Slowly add the milk mixture into the simmering broth; stirring constantly with a spoon.

Continue to cook and stir, until the gravy is thick and bubbly, then serve.

Yields: 2-1/2 cups of gravy

*Note: If I roast a 19 lb. bird, I am able to double the gravy ingredients, and then I'll add the already cooked, cut-up turkey meat into the gravy. The gravy and turkey meat taste great served over hot-cooked mashed potatoes. Also, whenever I double the recipe, I then prepare the gravy in a 3-quart saucepan.
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Old 11-24-2015, 10:21 PM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,160 posts, read 1,968,185 times
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I've been reading your posts, nice work.
But bouillon cubes add too much salt, imo.


Boiling down turkey or chicken stock would work much better for me; to add flavor, not salt.
And I use cornstarch (always) to make a rue/thickener instead of flour...it leaves no taste.
Recipe otherwise sounds fantastic
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Old 11-24-2015, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,847,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerraDown View Post
...And I use cornstarch (always) to make a rue/thickener instead of flour...it leaves no taste...
I always use fat and flour for my roux. The richness of the browned roux adds depth of flavor to my giblet gravy.
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Old 11-24-2015, 11:46 PM
 
25,631 posts, read 30,336,318 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
I always use fat and flour for my roux. The richness of the browned roux adds depth of flavor to my giblet gravy.
This and absolutely NO BOULLION.

Ok yeah I'm dramatic. So many better ways to flavor the gravy.
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Old 11-25-2015, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,359 posts, read 9,831,435 times
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Good gravy is very important to me...sounds like you folks know how to make great gravy.

Once, new friends invited us over for Thanksgiving. After I generously poured gravy on my turkey slices, mashed potatoes, and dressing, I took my first bite and almost gagged and spit out the mouthful. It tasted like chemicals and salt.

I gently asked my host how she made her gravy and she said it was too much trouble to make real gravy (but I would have made it for her!) so she THREW AWAY the drippings and made her gravy from one of those instant gravy powdered mixes.

BLEH...

I almost cried...good gravy is crucial for the Thanksgiving meal IMHO..everything else served is only a delivery system for the gravy...

Me--I like gravy made with pan drippings and scrapings and chopped giblets and some milk...thick and rich...and lots of it for future hot turkey sandwiches...

Wishing you all delicious gravy and fun times with your friends and family...
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Old 11-25-2015, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,981 posts, read 45,435,337 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Good gravy is very important to me...sounds like you folks know how to make great gravy.

Once, new friends invited us over for Thanksgiving. After I generously poured gravy on my turkey slices, mashed potatoes, and dressing, I took my first bite and almost gagged and spit out the mouthful. It tasted like chemicals and salt.

I gently asked my host how she made her gravy and she said it was too much trouble to make real gravy (but I would have made it for her!) so she THREW AWAY the drippings and made her gravy from one of those instant gravy powdered mixes.

BLEH...

I almost cried...good gravy is crucial for the Thanksgiving meal IMHO..everything else served is only a delivery system for the gravy...

Me--I like gravy made with pan drippings and scrapings and chopped giblets and some milk...thick and rich...and lots of it for future hot turkey sandwiches...

Wishing you all delicious gravy and fun times with your friends and family...
OMG. It reminds me of my former DIL's mother's gravy instructions. I have repeated this before. We referred to it as the "Iowa way". Her mother also said to pour off the drippings, and mix butter, flour and chicken broth for the gravy.
I was there to stop her, but not sure if she kept my way in the future, or the Iowa way. LOL.
I've never put milk in mine, but I might try it.
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Old 11-25-2015, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,359 posts, read 9,831,435 times
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...yes, some milk (and water, too, natch) makes for a richer, creamy gravy..but some might prefer a thinner, but still flavorful gravy, without the milk...it's so personal..this gravy thing..

My Mom made the best gravy and old-fashioned dressing, but it was a long, complicated process...as I recall. How she did all the prep and cooking in her wee-sized kitchen boggles the mind.
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Old 11-25-2015, 08:49 AM
 
Location: Chicago. Kind of.
2,895 posts, read 1,637,241 times
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I have to admit, shamefacedly, that besides anything involving yeast, I just can't make decent gravy. I'm going to save this for future reference - maybe it'll give me the gravy redemption I keep hoping for!
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Old 11-25-2015, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in Wisconsin
491 posts, read 243,148 times
Reputation: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerraDown View Post
I've been reading your posts, nice work.
But bouillon cubes add too much salt, imo.


Boiling down turkey or chicken stock would work much better for me; to add flavor, not salt.
And I use cornstarch (always) to make a rue/thickener instead of flour...it leaves no taste.
Recipe otherwise sounds fantastic

TerraDown, I never use bouillon cubes, only the granules as I have stated in the recipe, and I've been making this gravy for years, and never found it to be too salty. For those who are worried about it being too salty with using the granules, I would suggest adding half of the bouillon granules first, and once the gravy is heated through, then taste it, and from there decide if you'd like to add the rest. With 2 cups of the broth/liquid drippings, plus the 1/2 cup of milk, personally I don't think 1 teaspoon of the granules is too much.

As for the flour, it does works well with this recipe. I've never used cornstarch in this gravy, but I do use cornstarch in most other recipes when I need to thicken a sauce.
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Old 11-25-2015, 09:12 AM
 
765 posts, read 439,142 times
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I roast the bird over a bed of carrots, celery and onion. While Tom is resting, discard the vegetables and pour the pan drippings/scrapings into a measuring cup. Put it in the freezer for a few minutes.
Spoon the fat from the drippings into a pan, add a couple of tablespoons of butter. Whisk in equal amount of flour (1/4 cup fat to 1/4 cup flour). Make a nice roux. Slowly whisk the bird juices back into the roux. Check for seasoning. Add salt, pepper, paprika and/or a touch of cayenne or crushed red pepper flakes. If too thick, whisk in milk to the consistency you desire.
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