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Old 02-13-2008, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 8,638,189 times
Reputation: 17262

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1-2 slices hog jowl
1 lb beef or pork, cubed
1 onion, sliced or diced
1 can prepared gravy
1 can peas
1 can diced carrots
1/2-2 cups potato flakes

This can be done in a crock pot or in a skillet (I prefer a wok).

If using a crock pot, put the slice(s) hog jowl in with the cubed meat and turn on high for 2 hours. When browned, add the onions and gravy. Fold a few times, then cover and let cook together for one hour. Add the peas and carrots. The canned vegetables should be drained and rinsed first if you are trying to watch your salt intake, otherwise, include the liquid into the crockpot. Slowly add the potato flakes to thicken the liquids in the stew. This varies because of how lean your meat was and wehter you added the liquid from the vegetables. Then let simmer on low for three-four hours.

In a skillet over medium heat, put the sliced hog jowl, then add the cubed meat until lightly browned, then add the onions and flip a few times to get them all blended together and disperse the heat from the meat and grease to the onions. Add the vegetables and gravy and stir about a minute. Then add potato flakes to desired thickness. Cover and let simmer together 20-30 minutes, stirring once or twice and adding potato flakes as needed.

Serve over pasta, rice or with bread.

Number of servings varies greatly depending on the size and ages of family members and whether it is served over pasta, rice, with bread or alone.
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Old 02-13-2008, 11:56 AM
Status: " la recherche d'un emploi" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: South Bay Native
13,316 posts, read 21,878,456 times
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OK, I have to admit I stopped reading after the first ingredient. People say sushi and steak tartare are disgusting..I guess to each his own.

Just curious - where does one go to purchase hog jowls? I don't think I've ever seen them in my local supermarkets.
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Old 02-13-2008, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 8,638,189 times
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I was the same as you until I was 53. Then I found them in a small deli and would never have known what it was if I couldn't read. It looks just like sliced bacon only more of a half-moon shape to it and in a smallish more squarish package. They are often served instead of bacon because it really is much less expensive than bacon. I have since found them in the meat section of super Wal-Marts, deli's and in most grocery stores in small towns.

They are often used as the "grease" to start off cooking other things such as onions or other vegetables. When pennies count, you don't want to spend it on a bottle of oil that you might use just to grease the pan. It's very similar to using a slice or two of bacon instead of cooking oil or cooking spray. And it adds a bit of flavor as well. Poor folks usually can't justify buying spices and seasonings.
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Old 12-03-2008, 04:07 PM
 
1,308 posts, read 4,160,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
OK, I have to admit I stopped reading after the first ingredient. People say sushi and steak tartare are disgusting..I guess to each his own.

Just curious - where does one go to purchase hog jowls? I don't think I've ever seen them in my local supermarkets.
I have to laugh I never heard of hog jowl either and my tummy turned when I read that lol..........cant imagine going to a butcher and asking for that. Must be a southern thing????
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Old 12-03-2008, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Gary, WV & Springfield, ME
5,826 posts, read 8,638,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marye711 View Post
.......cant imagine going to a butcher and asking for that.
Do you ask the butcher for bacon? You wouldn't ask for hog jowl, either. It is already sliced and packaged in the pork section.
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Old 12-03-2008, 04:50 PM
Status: "Elect a clown? Expect a circus!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
58,073 posts, read 40,850,079 times
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There's an unsmoked Italian bacon called guanciale that's made from hog jowls.

Somewhere in the past, I don't remember where or who, someone wrote a famous line about using every part of a hog but the oink.
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Old 12-03-2008, 05:17 PM
 
3,714 posts, read 8,271,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
There's an unsmoked Italian bacon called guanciale that's made from hog jowls.

Somewhere in the past, I don't remember where or who, someone wrote a famous line about using every part of a hog but the oink.
And these days, a really frugal person would record the squeals and oinks and use them in the next Halloween haunted house!

On a more serious note, hog bristles make some of the finest brushes, but I don't think any companies in the US go to the effort anymore. They just shave the hide, you can't even buy a slab of bacon and use the skin to make cracklin's these days. My gran always used to buy bacon in slabs and cut the slices to the thickness she wanted - can't do that now.
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Old 12-04-2008, 06:53 AM
 
1,063 posts, read 2,712,339 times
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I will be looking for the hog jowls now. Never heard of them before but after you told us what and how they were used, I am more than willing to try this recipe.
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Old 12-04-2008, 04:33 PM
 
1,308 posts, read 4,160,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AliceT View Post
Do you ask the butcher for bacon? You wouldn't ask for hog jowl, either. It is already sliced and packaged in the pork section.
Yes as a matter of fact I do.
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