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Old 06-25-2016, 10:53 AM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,160 posts, read 1,964,409 times
Reputation: 9652

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Years ago Mrs. TD and I had dined at a very fine Seafood restaurant. The white sauce used over the fish was extraordinary. I have spent a couple of years trying to duplicate. This is what she says is 'spot on' taste, and since she is the one to please when I cook, I'm sticking to it. I know, no cheese! The slight hint of anchovy should not put you off, it really is the flavor you don't taste if you do it right but adds the umami that is so important to this sauce.
So here's my recipe.

1 1/2 to 2 tbsp butter, real, no salt
1/3 tsp Lemon Juice, freshly squeezed
1 garlic clove, crushed, left whole
1/4 to 1/2 tsp anchovy paste, depending upon your taste for anchovy/umami
1/4 cup white wine
1/3 to 1/2 cup heavy cream

Bouquet Garni consists of:
1 & 1/2 tsp fresh chives (I use garlic chives)
1/2 tsp fresh French tarragon (or Mexican tarragon)
1/2 tsp fresh chervril, diced
1/4 tsp fresh parsley, diced

Pink Himalayan salt crystals, freshly ground in salt mill, to taste
1 1/2 lbs. your favorite white fleshed fish (ours are about 1 1/2 inch
to 2 inch thick)

*Green onions, diced on a diagonal, garnish
*Fresh mint leaves, garnish
*fresh lemon zest, garnish

Place a broiler rack in oven within 10 inches of broiler heating coil.
Heat the broiler to 450 degrees.
Using a cheese cloth, tie up all of the fresh herbs into a ball, using Butcher's twine.
In an oven-proof pan, melt the butter, add the fillets and cook on stove for 2 mins on each side. Gently remove the fish and set aside.
Add the cream, wine, anchovy paste, crushed garlic clove (left intact) and Bouquet Garni. minus salt. Cook on high 1 minute, remove pan from heat.
Turn off burner.

Add fish back to pan and spoon some sauce over. Place pan under broiler. Cook for 8 to 14 minutes, depending upon thickness
of the fillets. Remove from oven when fish is firm. Remove Bouquet Garni and garlic clove.

Taste sauce, add salt as you think is needed.
Place onto individual plates, garnish with mint, green onions and lemon zest.

*Notes: If you don't have access to the above herbs, buy the spice mix:
'Fines Herbes'
It is a mixture of -
(French origin)
parsley, chives, tarragon,
and chervil.


*Don't skip on the anchovy. It will not be the same.

*If you want a thicker sauce, add 1/2 tsp. or so of Arrowroot after removing fish to plate.
Simmer while whisking in broiled sauce low on stove about 30 seconds.

*Double the amount of herbs if you are not using fresh. Also double the layer of cheesecloth so they do not escape. We like it with slightly crisp Chinese style fresh green beans, and some rice.

Last edited by TerraDown; 06-25-2016 at 12:16 PM..
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Old 06-25-2016, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
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Sounds great! Wish I were that ambitious.
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Old 06-25-2016, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Kanada 🍁
119,960 posts, read 14,232,679 times
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What a great recipe thank you for sharing
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Old 06-25-2016, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Laguna Beach CA
129 posts, read 55,124 times
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Do you think this sauce is too heavy for cod? (that's what I'm making tomorrow night). I really wanna try this!
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Old 06-25-2016, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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Sounds wonderful. I've been doing something similar for scallops. Next time I'll try adding the garlic and anchovy.
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Old 06-25-2016, 01:30 PM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,160 posts, read 1,964,409 times
Reputation: 9652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cast Iron Cutie View Post
Do you think this sauce is too heavy for cod? (that's what I'm making tomorrow night). I really wanna try this!
No, that's actually my fish of choice.

Gentlearts, it's nothing without the anchovy paste. Taste just a bit to your tongue first. If it is too sharp, then cut down. But it is an essential ingredient.
PS: Love to try that scallop recipe, we are all searching for that special taste

edit: I grow my own herbs, and expand the garden as needed. Even for City dwellers, this is dooable. Growing your own fresh spices will enhance all of your culinary dishes, I hope you give it a try.

Last edited by TerraDown; 06-25-2016 at 01:52 PM..
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Old 06-25-2016, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,952 posts, read 45,395,424 times
Reputation: 61438
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerraDown View Post
No, that's actually my fish of choice.

Gentlearts, it's nothing without the anchovy paste. Taste just a bit to your tongue first. If it is too sharp, then cut down. But it is an essential ingredient.
PS: Love to try that scallop recipe, we are all searching for that special taste

edit: I grow my own herbs, and expand the garden as needed. Even for City dwellers, this is dooable. Growing your own fresh spices will enhance all of your culinary dishes, I hope you give it a try.
Have you successfully grown tarragon? Its my go to herb for fish, but I find it hard to grow from seed, and can't find the plants. I've started freezing the fresh which is a bit better than dried.
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Old 06-25-2016, 05:32 PM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,160 posts, read 1,964,409 times
Reputation: 9652
Hi Gentlearts,
Where I live, I have had very bad luck with growing both French and Texas tarragon. The only herb that is close I have had luck with is 'Mexican' tarragon. It is stronger in flavor, one can use less than the two, and it does replace them for taste.

Forget the seeds, I have tried that too and actually got it to grow to harvest...not the same flavor, useless.

It has to be French, or Texas...or the Mexican substitute.

Like you, before I could grow the Mexican with success, I froze fresh proper tarragon.
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Old 06-25-2016, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles>Little Rock>Houston>Little Rock
6,488 posts, read 6,919,839 times
Reputation: 17366
That sounds delicious.
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Old 06-26-2016, 01:40 AM
 
Location: So Cal
14,558 posts, read 10,697,385 times
Reputation: 13914
Omg, that sounds amazing.
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