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Old 08-10-2016, 01:57 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,157 posts, read 20,437,717 times
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It's not cheaper for me to make homemade ice cream than it is to buy ice cream, but the quality is different. It's more like ending up with a gallon of Haagen Daz than like ending up with a gallon of Dreyer's.
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Old 08-10-2016, 02:45 PM
 
394 posts, read 407,798 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy2U View Post
We don't have an ice cream maker, but considering the sheer volume of ice cream that the husband eats, I've thought seriously about getting one. Does anyone have any idea what the cost difference is (approximately, of course) between home made and store bought? Figuring $4.50 for the carton you'd get at the store (I don't think it's a gallon anymore but I can't give you a specific amount), how much would home made run do you think? Texturally, is it a lot like the store bought or is it not as thick/dense (or moreso - I have no idea - never tried it. ) Can you do all kinds of add ins like the store bought kind? I'm thinking specifically of the chocolate fudge brownie one my husband is bonkers for.
The cost is obviously (and I'm being sincere, not snippy) going to vary based on where you purchase your ingredients. In one of my recipes I wrote about, the "French" vanilla--and a side note to the poster asking if French vanilla contains eggs--my parents started making this ice cream during the 60's when Julia Child was on t.v. so a lot of cooking was French inspired. I think my dad called this "French" vanilla because it sounded more fancy. I make a "French" vanilla which uses a whole vanilla bean in the custard, not vanilla extract.

Anyway, the biggest expense for me and making housemade ice cream is the heavy cream. I purchase mine from Costco and I can get a half gallon for about .10 cents an ounce which is really good. Eggs are cheap, as low as .07 cents each. I just paid .38 cents each for organic brown from Costco so that's a bit higher cost. So then I have to add whole milk, vanilla and a pinch of salt...I can make a gallon of vanilla ice cream for under $5.00. The other advantage is I know exactly what when into my ice cream.

Other costs will be the mix-ins. What I do is after the vanilla is made I can take out a portion right away and make a chocolate ice cream in my kitchen aid mixer. I also make a chocolate syrup (.20 cents/oz)and I add that to the vanilla until mixed and then freeze it in another container. So the varieties are endless after you have the base. You could swirl in a caramel, caramel/choc with cookie dough, etc.

When I didn't have time to make my own, I used to buy Blue Bell which was the best commercial ice cream around and still a gallon. Their normal price was about $7.00/gal. I would only buy it when it was on sale for $3.99/gallon. My favorite was the "Great Divide" 50/50 chocolate and vanilla. I wish it would come back to AZ, but I'm probably better off not eating it!

For company I make the vanilla ice cream and then have an ice cream "bar" set up with all the mix-ins you can think of. Everyone has fun making their own creation!
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Old 08-10-2016, 02:52 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,876 posts, read 42,076,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy2U View Post
We don't have an ice cream maker, but considering the sheer volume of ice cream that the husband eats, I've thought seriously about getting one. Does anyone have any idea what the cost difference is (approximately, of course) between home made and store bought? Figuring $4.50 for the carton you'd get at the store (I don't think it's a gallon anymore but I can't give you a specific amount), how much would home made run do you think? Texturally, is it a lot like the store bought or is it not as thick/dense (or moreso - I have no idea - never tried it. ) Can you do all kinds of add ins like the store bought kind? I'm thinking specifically of the chocolate fudge brownie one my husband is bonkers for.
If you do it right the quart of cream used to make the ice cream is more than the store bought product.

However, why buy a Cruze when you can get a Cadillac?

You can add stuff but timing is important. The mixing will take anywhere from a half hour to an hour so what you add at the beginning will get thoroughly mixed in.

Also, the big ice cream makers can flash freeze the stuff, something you can't really do at home.
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Old 08-10-2016, 04:20 PM
 
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Okay thanks everyone for the input.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IslandCityGirl View Post

NO!!! When you make custard, stir, stir, stir CONSTANTLY, use a heavy-bottomed saucepan, don't heat it too high, and remove it from the heat once it thickens. You should not have any scrambled eggs. If you do, then you've just strained out all of the benefits that your eggs were supposed to add to you ice cream and there was no point to making the custard in the first place.

This is a great example of how eggs can affect the texture of ice cream. When the yolks are cooked, the protein behaves in such a way that prevents crystalline structures (iciness) even more so than they do when you use raw eggs. You get a creamier ice cream because the eggs have been cooked. It's not a right or a wrong. It's just one of the ways to manipulate the outcome.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/02/di...need.html?_r=0
I don't understand what you mean by this. You say that cooking the yokes makes the cream less crystal-ish, right?

But how am I suppose to cook the yokes, if it leads to a scrambled egg substance, by cooking them? Shouldn't I just leave them raw, and just simmer them a bit, or what am I doing wrong?
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Old 08-10-2016, 04:26 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, USVI - Seattle, WA - Gulf Coast, TX
811 posts, read 729,770 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Okay thanks everyone for the input.



I don't understand what you mean by this. You say that cooking the yokes makes the cream less crystal-ish, right?

But how am I suppose to cook the yokes, if it leads to a scrambled egg substance, by cooking them? Shouldn't I just leave them raw, and just simmer them a bit, or what am I doing wrong?
When you properly make a custard, the yolks will remain emulsified (combined) with the other ingredients that you are stirring on the stove. Cooking them does NOT mean scrambling them. Cooking the custard properly (gently, slowly, with constant stirring) will result in the whole pot of liquid thickening slightly as the yolks cook. If the yolks pull away from the the rest of your liquid, into gobs of scrambled eggs, then you have not made a proper custard. Click the link to the NY Times ice cream article that I gave you, at the bottom of my previous post. There is a video that will play right above the article that shows PERFECTLY how to make the custard, including a "whoopsie" of a few bits of scrambled eggs. Watch the video and read that article, which also explains the workings of custard, in detail. It will hopefully make sense to you at that point.
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Old 08-10-2016, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles>Little Rock>Houston>Little Rock
6,488 posts, read 6,945,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Okay thanks everyone for the input.



I don't understand what you mean by this. You say that cooking the yokes makes the cream less crystal-ish, right?

But how am I suppose to cook the yokes, if it leads to a scrambled egg substance, by cooking them? Shouldn't I just leave them raw, and just simmer them a bit, or what am I doing wrong?
You have to temper the yolks with a little bit of the hot liquid before adding them in. Read Alton's recipe...he explains it well. Chocolate Ice Cream Recipe : Alton Brown : Food Network
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Old 08-10-2016, 04:39 PM
 
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Okay thanks. I tempered them before but I still got scrambled eggs. Probably simmered them a little too long maybe.

I want to keep trying but every recipe says to leave the custard in the fridge, overnight before making the ice cream it seems. This way, I will not know if I have done a good job, until I wait a day each time.

Is their anyway to speed up the process, other than one day? One recipe said to wait at least two hours, but that is quite a while too. What I am waiting for, the custard substance seems to look the same, the next day.
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Old 08-10-2016, 04:52 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,157 posts, read 20,437,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Okay thanks. I tempered them before but I still got scrambled eggs. Probably simmered them a little too long maybe.

I want to keep trying but every recipe says to leave the custard in the fridge, overnight before making the ice cream it seems. This way, I will not know if I have done a good job, until I wait a day each time.

Is their anyway to speed up the process, other than one day? One recipe said to wait at least two hours, but that is quite a while too. What I am waiting for, the custard substance seems to look the same, the next day.
I strain the hot custard mixture before refrigerating it. That way I can remove the eggy bits more easily because it hasn't thickened as much as it will in the fridge.

To prevent ice crystals and rock hard ice cream (the kind that bends the spoon) add a little bit of liquor to ice cream. I use rum in vanilla ice cream and bourbon in chocolate ice cream.
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Old 08-10-2016, 05:09 PM
 
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Okay thanks. However, it was said on here before that the if the egg is removed, then it prevents the custard from being a custard. So how much egg should be strained if this is the case?
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Old 08-10-2016, 05:17 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, USVI - Seattle, WA - Gulf Coast, TX
811 posts, read 729,770 times
Reputation: 2290
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Okay thanks. I tempered them before but I still got scrambled eggs. Probably simmered them a little too long maybe.

I want to keep trying but every recipe says to leave the custard in the fridge, overnight before making the ice cream it seems. This way, I will not know if I have done a good job, until I wait a day each time.

Is their anyway to speed up the process, other than one day? One recipe said to wait at least two hours, but that is quite a while too. What I am waiting for, the custard substance seems to look the same, the next day.
I really wish you would click on the link I gave you. It would seriously answer all of your questions in one fell swoop. The video (only 3 1/2 minutes of your time) talks about why you need to chill the custard prior to churning. Not only are you making the ice cream-maker work too hard if it has to freeze warm liquid, but it will take longer. The longer the ice cream churns, the "fluffier" it will be, instead of rich, dense, and creamy, which is how most people like their ice cream. If you like fluffy ice cream that melts fast and doesn't hold its shape, then sure, skip the chilling part. Maybe it'll turn out kind of like soft serve, which is nothing to turn your nose up at, anyway.

Some things just require patience to be excellent. In my experience the custard does not need to chill for more than a couple of hours. Overnight sounds excessive. It just needs to be cold, however long that takes. You don't want to cut corners by stirring it over an ice bath or the like, because, again, you will add air and end up with a fluffier consistency.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Okay thanks. However, it was said on here before that the if the egg is removed, then it prevents the custard from being a custard. So how much egg should be strained if this is the case?
When I make custard, I usually have ZERO bits of scrambled eggs to strain. If you have any at all, it should just be a few, tiny bits that were probably caused from custard sticking to the bottom of the pan. Please, watch the video in the link!!! You should have NO MORE than the amount that the gal in the video shows in the strainer.
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