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Old 08-09-2016, 08:22 PM
 
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When it comes to making home made ice cream, there are different recipes out there. However, a lot of them are very different on how many egg yokes to use.

One recipe was for a smaller amount of ice cream, and it said to use 8 egg yokes, and another, is for a larger amount of ice cream, and it said to only use 3.

So I am confused on how man yokes I should use or what difference it makes, as to why some people have vast preferences.

Can anyone tell me?
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Old 08-09-2016, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles>Little Rock>Houston>Little Rock
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I never figured our why there was such a big discrepancy. We use Alton Brown's recipe, which calls for 8 yolks. The more egg yolks, the richer the ice cream.

Last edited by maggie2101; 08-09-2016 at 08:50 PM..
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Old 08-09-2016, 09:51 PM
 
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Okay thanks. Well is it normal for a large portion of the left overs to look like scrambled eggs after you strain it?
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Old 08-09-2016, 10:05 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
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If it looks like scrambled egg, then you cooked it a little too long or a little too hot.

You can buy pasteurized eggs, and then you don't have to worry quite as much about getting them hot enough to kill the germs while keeping them cool enough that your custard doesn't turn into egg drop soup
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Old 08-09-2016, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
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I read the thread because I just got an ice cream maker about a month ago and haven't had much luck, my problem being that I am trying to do it on the cheap and without a lot of work, no custards or cream. Tonight I think I had my first real success, though I won't know until I try it tomorrow once it has firmed up in the freezer.

What I made actually was a sorbet. I saw some Goya Mango Nectar in the store, a 33 oz carton for $1.69 and I thought that would make a good flavor. I made about a 1/4 cup of simple syrup (the nectar has sugar in it already), added about a cup of half & half, and about 3 tablespoons of lemoncello, an Italian lemon liqueur and used about half the carton of mango nectar. Combined all the ingredients and put in the maker and after 25 minutes I had a great mango sorbet, the texture was just right, not icy crystals, but smooth. But as I say, the texture might not be so wonderful tomorrow after freezing.
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Old 08-09-2016, 11:23 PM
 
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I make 2 different types of ice cream. I make my dad's French vanilla which involves no cooking of the eggs at all. There's only 4 eggs in the recipe and I use the entire egg. I mix it all in my kitchen aid mixer and then pour it into an old electric "Dixie Bell" ice cream freezer. The ice cream is delicious and more of a firm yet soft serve type ice cream. It is very light.

The second I make a custard and cook the egg yolks etc. It's for a smaller kitchen aid ice cream maker where you freeze the bowl the night before and then make the ice cream. This ice cream is very rich and creamy. After it is mixed I scoop out the ice cream mixture and place it in a long aluminum pan-like a brownie pan-and cover it with plastic wrap pressed onto the ice cream.

Understand about the 1st ice cream recipe: this is from the early 1960's and they didn't worry about salmonella or raw eggs etc. I have been making this recipe without any problems ever. I like that it makes a gallon of ice cream and that it is easy to put together. The hard part is babysitting my 1960's ice cream freezer with crushed ice and salt!
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Old 08-10-2016, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Chicago. Kind of.
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We don't have an ice cream maker, but considering the sheer volume of ice cream that the husband eats, I've thought seriously about getting one. Does anyone have any idea what the cost difference is (approximately, of course) between home made and store bought? Figuring $4.50 for the carton you'd get at the store (I don't think it's a gallon anymore but I can't give you a specific amount), how much would home made run do you think? Texturally, is it a lot like the store bought or is it not as thick/dense (or moreso - I have no idea - never tried it. ) Can you do all kinds of add ins like the store bought kind? I'm thinking specifically of the chocolate fudge brownie one my husband is bonkers for.
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Old 08-10-2016, 01:22 PM
 
Location: St Thomas, USVI - Seattle, WA - Gulf Coast, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
When it comes to making home made ice cream, there are different recipes out there. However, a lot of them are very different on how many egg yokes to use.

One recipe was for a smaller amount of ice cream, and it said to use 8 egg yokes, and another, is for a larger amount of ice cream, and it said to only use 3.

So I am confused on how man yokes I should use or what difference it makes, as to why some people have vast preferences.

Can anyone tell me?
There are many, many styles of ice cream. Some hard ice creams and ice milks have no eggs in them at all. Eggs will affect the flavor, texture, density, creaminess, and hardness of a recipe. It just all depends on how you like your ice cream. Most of the time people tend to prefer custard-based (egg yolks cooked in cream/milk) ice creams that are pretty heavy on the yolks. More yolks = a richer, creamier texture, and a firmer ice cream that holds its shape better for scooping into cones, etc.

The other piece of chemistry that is really important with ice cream is thinking about total fat content and moisture content, and how those things are going to affect the crystalline structure of the ice cream (creamy vs. icy/crunchy). It's a balancing act. If you use a ton of butter fat/cream in a recipe, then you'll want to cut back on the yolks a bit. If you use mostly milk (as opposed to cream), then you will benefit from more yolks (to create more body and creaminess).

Even further, if you have a fatty add-in (like chocolate), then you'll want to cut back on the fat that is in the custard. Again, it's a balancing act. If you have a watery/fruity add-in, like strawberries, then you'll need to balance that added moisture with fat, in order to avoid ice crystals from ruining the texture.

So, there's more than you probably ever wanted to know about ice cream.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Okay thanks. Well is it normal for a large portion of the left overs to look like scrambled eggs after you strain it?
NO!!! When you make custard, stir, stir, stir CONSTANTLY, use a heavy-bottomed saucepan, don't heat it too high, and remove it from the heat once it thickens. You should not have any scrambled eggs. If you do, then you've just strained out all of the benefits that your eggs were supposed to add to you ice cream and there was no point to making the custard in the first place.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MGS4EVER View Post
I make 2 different types of ice cream. I make my dad's French vanilla which involves no cooking of the eggs at all. There's only 4 eggs in the recipe and I use the entire egg. I mix it all in my kitchen aid mixer and then pour it into an old electric "Dixie Bell" ice cream freezer. The ice cream is delicious and more of a firm yet soft serve type ice cream. It is very light.

The second I make a custard and cook the egg yolks etc. It's for a smaller kitchen aid ice cream maker where you freeze the bowl the night before and then make the ice cream. This ice cream is very rich and creamy. After it is mixed I scoop out the ice cream mixture and place it in a long aluminum pan-like a brownie pan-and cover it with plastic wrap pressed onto the ice cream...
This is a great example of how eggs can affect the texture of ice cream. When the yolks are cooked, the protein behaves in such a way that prevents crystalline structures (iciness) even more so than they do when you use raw eggs. You get a creamier ice cream because the eggs have been cooked. It's not a right or a wrong. It's just one of the ways to manipulate the outcome.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy2U View Post
We don't have an ice cream maker, but considering the sheer volume of ice cream that the husband eats, I've thought seriously about getting one. Does anyone have any idea what the cost difference is (approximately, of course) between home made and store bought? Figuring $4.50 for the carton you'd get at the store (I don't think it's a gallon anymore but I can't give you a specific amount), how much would home made run do you think? Texturally, is it a lot like the store bought or is it not as thick/dense (or moreso - I have no idea - never tried it. ) Can you do all kinds of add ins like the store bought kind? I'm thinking specifically of the chocolate fudge brownie one my husband is bonkers for.
I'm not sure on cost. It totally depends on the quality of ingredients that you use. It's milk, cream, eggs, and sugar. As with most things, you can probably make it cheaper than you can pay someone to do it, but it depends on what those things cost you.

There are a million different ice cream recipes out there, all with different results. So, texturally, you absolutely can make ice cream like you purchase in the store. You can also make ice cream that tastes totally different. Yes, you can also do all kinds of add-ins. See the first part of my post for some nerdy, chemistry comments about how add-ins work.

This NY Times article about ice-cream is the BEST info about ice cream in print that I have seen to date. I wish I would have written it!! It will walk you through, not only a fantastic, basic recipe, but how to adjust it for different add-ins, to achieve different textures, etc. Click the pic with the "interactive guide" after you've read the article. The whole thing is very well written and helpful. I'll vouch for the ice cream recipe too.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/02/di...need.html?_r=0

Last edited by IslandCityGirl; 08-10-2016 at 01:34 PM..
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Old 08-10-2016, 01:45 PM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
58,195 posts, read 41,026,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maggie2101 View Post
I never figured our why there was such a big discrepancy. We use Alton Brown's recipe, which calls for 8 yolks. The more egg yolks, the richer the ice cream.

I've made the following a number of times and it's quite rich despite having no egg yolks:



Coconut Ice Cream
1 cup milk
One 15 oz can sweetened cream of coconut
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
1 1/2 tightly packed sweetened coconut flakes
1 Tbsp Bacardi Gold

Place the coconut cream and milk in a food processor and blend thoroughly.
Stir in the cream and coconut flakes.
Chill thoroughly
Pour the mixture into the bowl of the machine and freeze.
Makes about 1 quart.

As far as the packed coconut goes I don't measure but add 'til it looks about right. I give it a quick chop with a knife as if the flakes are too long they tend to clump together.
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Old 08-10-2016, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,486 posts, read 20,957,413 times
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I have made homemade vanilla ice cream in my ice cream maker but it never called for eggs. I guess French vanilla has eggs in it?
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