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Old 01-10-2017, 12:15 AM
 
Location: Europe
518 posts, read 246,659 times
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"Semolino"
The Semolino is made from durum wheat semolina and not with wheat flour.
Differences:
Semola del grano duro
Farina di grano tenero
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Old 01-10-2017, 11:47 AM
 
5,181 posts, read 5,035,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickerman View Post
I bought polenta prepared from a grocery store.

I'm a bit confused. Did you buy one of those plastic-wrapped rolls of polenta and put 2/3 c of it into 3 c of boiling water? I think your recipe, and the others mentioned in this thread, are using the dry polenta. There's a big difference between the two. As far as I know, the ready-made polenta doesn't require further boiling or other addition of water and is ready for use as an ingredient in a recipe.
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Old 01-11-2017, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Chicago. Kind of.
2,895 posts, read 1,629,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
I'm a bit confused. Did you buy one of those plastic-wrapped rolls of polenta and put 2/3 c of it into 3 c of boiling water? I think your recipe, and the others mentioned in this thread, are using the dry polenta. There's a big difference between the two. As far as I know, the ready-made polenta doesn't require further boiling or other addition of water and is ready for use as an ingredient in a recipe.
Now that I reread it, I think you're right.

If that's the case, nickerman, why don't you do a Google search on "prepared polenta recipes".
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Old 01-11-2017, 10:05 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, USVI - Seattle, WA - Gulf Coast, TX
811 posts, read 717,619 times
Reputation: 2290
Quote:
Originally Posted by P47P47 View Post
I'm a bit confused. Did you buy one of those plastic-wrapped rolls of polenta and put 2/3 c of it into 3 c of boiling water? I think your recipe, and the others mentioned in this thread, are using the dry polenta. There's a big difference between the two. As far as I know, the ready-made polenta doesn't require further boiling or other addition of water and is ready for use as an ingredient in a recipe.
Yeah, this is exactly what I was thinking too... To complicate things, Nickerman, even dry polenta comes in standard and "quick-cooking" forms. They require different timelines and amounts of liquid. You're better off to start with reading the directions and info on the package before diving into a separate recipe, to make sure it's asking for the same product.
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Old 01-12-2017, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Europe
518 posts, read 246,659 times
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The Polenta we make only with wheat flour, cereal flour or corn flour (the most used) and water, I don't know what ready-bags you have!!
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Old 01-12-2017, 06:35 AM
 
5,181 posts, read 5,035,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ste68 View Post
The Polenta we make only with wheat flour, cereal flour or corn flour (the most used) and water, I don't know what ready-bags you have!!

Ready-made polenta comes in a plastic-wrapped roll, like some brands of sausage. I usually just slice it into 1/2" thick pieces and put them in a pan with some oil to heat them thoroughly and make the cut surfaces crisp, like I'd do with left-over grits.
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Old 01-12-2017, 09:01 AM
 
Location: near Turin (Italy)
1,380 posts, read 965,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ste68 View Post
The Polenta we make only with wheat flour, cereal flour or corn flour (the most used) and water, I don't know what ready-bags you have!!
I still can't imagine polenta made with wheat, an the most similar thing (even if the cereal is not the same) for me remains semolino. That's probably just a funny regional difference
I know the "polenta bianca", from north-east Italy, which is made with a white variety of corn, the "polenta taragna" made with buckwheat, even chestnuts polenta, but not wheat.

Anyway, have you ever seen that terrible pre-cooked "polenta valsugana", ready in just 8 minutes? We do have lazy cooks too..

I've just checked, that company started to sell cooked polenta too! I'm really speachless right now
https://www.polentavalsugana.it/pronta
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