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Old 05-20-2017, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,545 posts, read 10,855,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eureka1 View Post
Apparently they do things differently in Wyoming. Which is ok.
It ffits the definition of an omelette. What would you call it?
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Old 05-22-2017, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
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I wouldn't call it "Egg Foo Yung"!!
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Old 05-22-2017, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Boston
3,732 posts, read 1,457,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
It ffits the definition of an omelette. What would you call it?
Egg foo yong is held by cornstarch if you get it in a restaurant, they also use modified food starch which is easier to deal with...
thats why it tends to have more body and forms thicker patties than just fried egg.
Its ladled in and left alone, scooping oil over the top helps, then flip it.
My wife does them in the wok, it seems to pool the oil better and forms the egg.

Omelettes are agitated very quickly initially as they cook, they cook very very quickly. 30 seconds.

My wife is Chinese, I'm a french trained chef, the cafe where I apprenticed served 200 omelettes on a busy day, at least 4 pans smoking on the stove, add oil , swirl and then the eggs, it was a very quick process, nothing like I see most people do, carbon steel pans for fast heat transfer.

I'll take the foo yong anyday.

Theres a french dish, don't know the name but they whip the eggs, add corn starch, minced garlic and grated swiss into the egg, then cook like egg foo yong in a steel bowl, we used the mixing bowl from the hobart mixer.
It was ok, no sauce though.
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Old 05-22-2017, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonesg View Post
...on a busy day, at least 4 pans smoking on the stove, add oil , swirl and then the eggs, it was a very quick process, nothing like I see most people do, carbon steel pans for fast heat transfer...
The problem I have with almost every restaurant-cooked omelette I have ever tried: the eggs get browned. I even ask that they not be browned. For me, an omelette is ruined if the eggs brown.

I know most people probably prefer a browned omelette, but I like the subtle richness of the eggs to stand-out.

I've never eaten Egg Foo Yung, so I don't know how browning impacts the flavor of that dish.
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Old 05-22-2017, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,545 posts, read 10,855,846 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eureka1 View Post
I wouldn't call it "Egg Foo Yung"!!
I prefer /oo/ to /u/. I also write /Hindoo/. /oo/ looks delightfully more exotic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonesg View Post
Egg foo yong is held by cornstarch if you get it in a restaurant, they also use modified food starch which is easier to deal with...
thats why it tends to have more body and forms thicker patties than just fried egg.
.
.
I searched for modified food starch on Amazon. It gave me these results. Is this the correct stuff?

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...ed+food+starch

.
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Old 05-22-2017, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Holly Springs, NC
1,261 posts, read 706,466 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eureka1 View Post
Deep fried? This is the first I've heard of that. Egg Foo Yung as we know it is cooked in patties, not in blobs . But the ingredients are the same. We use char siu when we have it.
That's funny because I've never seen it not deep fried! Must be a regional thing.

https://www.thespruce.com/egg-foo-yu...t-style-694558
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Old 05-22-2017, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Boston
3,732 posts, read 1,457,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
I prefer /oo/ to /u/. I also write /Hindoo/. /oo/ looks delightfully more exotic.

I searched for modified food starch on Amazon. It gave me these results. Is this the correct stuff?

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...ed+food+starch

.
Clear gel would work, but then...so does corn starch.

The difference is when you make a slurry the corn starch settles to the bottom.

Clear gel stays in suspension. Chinese restaurants keep it in a squeeze bottle and spray it into the dish, can't store corn starch like that.
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Old 05-22-2017, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,321 posts, read 534,202 times
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Egg Foo Young, Har Lung Wu,...etc are basically a part of Chop Suey culture. There may not be a standard recipe.
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Old 05-22-2017, 05:05 PM
 
Location: Boston
3,732 posts, read 1,457,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
The problem I have with almost every restaurant-cooked omelette I have ever tried: the eggs get browned. I even ask that they not be browned. For me, an omelette is ruined if the eggs brown.

I know most people probably prefer a browned omelette, but I like the subtle richness of the eggs to stand-out.

I've never eaten Egg Foo Yung, so I don't know how browning impacts the flavor of that dish.
Most people can't cook an omelette, its not so easy. And yet its rediculously simple.
Should have no color or the eggs have become over heated and the water drops out. It should be almost creamy but not runny. Many recipes call for milk in the eggs, thats fried custard. It will break and the water will seperate out leaving it dry and rubbery. The best way is to add a tiny bit of water.
We used to add about a cup to 5 gallons of egg. It combats the evaporation.
Its also easier if the eggs are beaten then left to break down, fresh beaten egg is like trying to work with liquid latex.

Egg foo yong is browned because it contains starch, the temp has to go higher to bloom the starch.
If the starch isn't bloomed it will be sloppy and cause diarrhea.
You can watch them cook in any "to go" chinese food place, they scoop the hot oil over the top of the foo yong, then flip it. Its very similar to deep fried but keeps more control over the patty.

http://i261.photobucket.com/albums/i...eandskinny.jpg
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Old 05-22-2017, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Boston
3,732 posts, read 1,457,199 times
Reputation: 5796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
The problem I have with almost every restaurant-cooked omelette I have ever tried: the eggs get browned. I even ask that they not be browned. For me, an omelette is ruined if the eggs brown.

I know most people probably prefer a browned omelette, but I like the subtle richness of the eggs to stand-out.

I've never eaten Egg Foo Yung, so I don't know how browning impacts the flavor of that dish.
Most people can't cook an omelette, its not so easy. And yet its rediculously simple.
Should have no color or the eggs have become over heated and the water drops out. It should be almost creamy but not runny. Many recipes call for milk in the eggs, thats fried custard. It will break and the water will seperate out leaving it dry and rubbery. The best way is to add a tiny bit of water.
We used to add about a cup to 5 gallons of egg. It combats the evaporation.
Its also easier if the eggs are beaten then left to break down, fresh beaten egg is like trying to work with liquid latex.

Egg foo yong is browned because it contains starch, the temp has to go higher to bloom the starch.
If the starch isn't bloomed it will be sloppy and cause diarrhea.
You can watch them cook in any "to go" chinese food place, they scoop the hot oil over the top of the foo yong, then flip it. Its very similar to deep fried but keeps more control over the patty.

Pic is the French chef, Maurice, making an omelette, I'm the skinny kid on sandwiches, just starting out around 17yrs old, Maurice is dead now, and I'm retired on S/S. Old photo.!

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