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Old 07-29-2017, 07:15 PM
 
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When home-making bread, why do many make little separate holes in the flour to add yeast, salt and sugar? ---First, why not just sprinkle them? Second, why separate the holes of each ingredient?
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Old 07-29-2017, 07:24 PM
 
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Salt will kill yeast. They should be separated until the yeast is mixed in with the other ingredients. The sugar will feed the yeast and those can be placed in together.
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Old 07-29-2017, 08:01 PM
 
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Thanks, didn't know salt kills yeast. But then, why not sprinkle yeast, then sprinkle other ingredients, and salt, which makes it easier to mix? why holes?
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Old 07-29-2017, 08:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowmountains View Post
Thanks, didn't know salt kills yeast. But then, why not sprinkle yeast, then sprinkle other ingredients, and salt, which makes it easier to mix? why holes?
Well, holes really aren't needed. Just mix appropriately.
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Old 07-29-2017, 08:28 PM
Status: " la recherche d'un emploi" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: South Bay Native
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Instead of holes, when my mom made her bread she would measure out a quantity of warm water, the yeast, and sugar into a measuring cup and had the yeast activate and bubble up to the top before pouring the liquid into the bowl of salted flour. It was then that she poured it into the hole in the flour because it was easiest to work the flour in gradually, and all that mixing and kneading worked the gluten for a delicious chewiness and crispy crust that commercial bread products just can compare.

I use a bread maker myself when making bread, and it requires sprinkling the yeast on top of the flour, which sits on top of the water. The paddle on the bottom of the pan acts like the baker's hand, inverted, that stirs and kneads the water into the flour. Comes out perfect every time, and the best part is I don't have to do any of the real work!
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Old 07-29-2017, 08:49 PM
 
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Ha, I just found the holes are cute .
It seems to me hand-making bread is fun in itself, and seems quite simple.
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Old 07-30-2017, 12:07 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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I used to meticulously keep my yeast and salt separate. I used to make a sponge, I used to proof, and so on.

Now I just throw all the dry in and mix. Then I add the water and mix. Boom. Let it rise. No knead.

I have been making dough about four times a week this summer with no rising problems with my slapdash methods.
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Old 07-30-2017, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Middle America
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
Instead of holes, when my mom made her bread she would measure out a quantity of warm water, the yeast, and sugar into a measuring cup and had the yeast activate and bubble up to the top before pouring the liquid into the bowl of salted flour. It was then that she poured it into the hole in the flour because it was easiest to work the flour in gradually, and all that mixing and kneading worked the gluten for a delicious chewiness and crispy crust that commercial bread products just can compare.
The only yeast-risen thing I make is pizza dough, and I always add my warm water to my yeast and sugar in a small bowl, stir till dissolved, and let it go to work for ten minutes. Then it gets dumped into a bigger bowl with my dry ingredients and olive oil and immediately mixed, then kneaded.
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Old 07-30-2017, 05:34 AM
 
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Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
The only yeast-risen thing I make is pizza dough, and I always add my warm water to my yeast and sugar in a small bowl, stir till dissolved, and let it go to work for ten minutes. Then it gets dumped into a bigger bowl with my dry ingredients and olive oil and immediately mixed, then kneaded.
Yes, I'm old school too. I still proof my yeast before using it to make sure it's active. However, with the newer instant, fast active brands of yeast, that step is not needed anymore. The yeast can be added to the flour and other ingredients straight away. But...I still proof anyway.
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Old 08-05-2017, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Upstate NY
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Because that's what Grandma used to do.
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