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Old 09-06-2017, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 13,895,312 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Steak and Kidney Pie is wonderful. However, I think you have to be exposed to kidneys at an early age to appreciate them. They have a very strong aroma (like a urinal), so they are an acquired taste. I absolutely love sautéed lamb kidneys.
My ex husband used to make an egyptian dish with offal. I forget the name. Offal and veggies and lemon juice. It had lamb kidneys in it, and you are right...they are delicious.
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Old 09-11-2017, 12:57 AM
 
561 posts, read 385,251 times
Reputation: 1263
Quote:
Originally Posted by 17thAndK View Post
I somehow inherited a copy of the 1910 Fannie Farmer Boston Cooking School cookbook. I love it, but it's value to me is in the depth of what it conveys about life in those times. No idea of transportation or actual refrigeration, no concept at all of a 350-degree oven. We sometimes forget how far we've come in quite a short time.

I have a hardback reproduction of the Fannie Farmer cookbook from the late 1890s. But I also have a real hardback copy of the last Fannie Farmer revised cookbook from about 1985. It's an American classic.

The early Fannie Farmer cookbooks were revolutionary for their time. Fannie was the first American cookbook author to promote the use of teaspoons, tablespoons and cups when measuring the ingredients in a recipe. Before Fannie, a recipe for a cake might tell you to use "seven handfuls of flour, five handfuls of sugar, four fingers of milk, and a large dash of baking soda...." Fannie turned cooking into an exact science, compared to earlier cookbooks. She was known as the "Mother of the Level Tablespoon," and we're still using the Fannie Farmer method today.

As for the 350-degree oven, you have to remember that people were still cooking with coal- and wood-burning ovens in 1910. There wasn't a dial on the oven that allowed you to set the temp to 350 degrees. But an experienced cook at the time could hold their hand near the oven and tell you if the temperature was right for baking either a cake of biscuits.

Last edited by RDM66; 09-11-2017 at 01:13 AM..
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Old 09-11-2017, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,470 posts, read 20,811,102 times
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I don't have the recipe but I was watching a movie and the family was serving Aspic. I found out what it is and it does not sound appetizing to me. Has anyone ever made it/ate it??
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Old 09-12-2017, 03:01 AM
 
561 posts, read 385,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
I don't have the recipe but I was watching a movie and the family was serving Aspic. I found out what it is and it does not sound appetizing to me. Has anyone ever made it/ate it??
When I was a kid, aspics were still popular. Yes, I tried them a few times but I was not a fan.

It wasn't until mid-60s that aspics began to fall from grace, but they were quickly replaced with meat-free "Jell-O salads." People used to stir about every fruit and vegetable into Jell-O. There was even a notorious recipe that ran in a woman's magazine in the early 1970's that had crushed potato chips encased in Jell-O.
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Old 09-12-2017, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,470 posts, read 20,811,102 times
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[quote=RDM66;49492384]When I was a kid, aspics were still popular. Yes, I tried them a few times but I was not a fan.

It wasn't until mid-60s that aspics began to fall from grace, but they were quickly replaced with meat-free "Jell-O salads." People used to stir about every fruit and vegetable into Jell-O. There was even a notorious recipe that ran in a woman's magazine in the early 1970's that had crushed potato chips encased in Jell-O.[/quote]

Eww! I can't stand the texture of jello.
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Old 09-12-2017, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,829,758 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
...Eww! I can't stand the texture of jello.
I love Jello and blancmange. In England, we bought Jello mix as a gelatin cube (like a big gummi) instead of gelatin powder.

One of my favorite Jello dishes is green Jello with various fruits and veggies suspended in it. Someone made it as a joke for Thanksgiving, and I loved it.
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Old 09-14-2017, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,717 posts, read 23,689,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
I don't have the recipe but I was watching a movie and the family was serving Aspic. I found out what it is and it does not sound appetizing to me. Has anyone ever made it/ate it??
No. I don't like gelled foods. I might try this: Kate's Kitchen: Tomato Aspic, Avocado Mousse and Seafood
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Old 09-23-2017, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,546 posts, read 14,173,408 times
Reputation: 30125
Quote:
Originally Posted by JrzDefector View Post
NOTHING beats these old WW recipes:
Weight Watchers recipe cards, circa 1974
Oh my goodness, how awful. I did WW during that decade but do not remember recipes like that. We were supposed to eat liver once a week, though. I do remember that.
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Old 09-23-2017, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,546 posts, read 14,173,408 times
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I have made my share of Jello. I gave up jello in any form, years ago. Too much sugar and artificial flavors for me.

My mom used to make a bang up red jello "salad" with a sour cream layer. Frozen strawberries, chopped celery and nuts were ingredients. I guess the addition of celery made it a salad!

For several decades these were common as salads.
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Old 09-23-2017, 02:25 PM
 
35,121 posts, read 39,979,322 times
Reputation: 62022
Quote:
Originally Posted by lindarby View Post
I just found this on facebook and it has so many old recipes. I can't wait to try them. If you have a facebook account join and check it out. It is called Recipes of days gone by.
No thanks, there is nothing on this planet reason enough for me to get a facebook account.
I would venture to guess one could go to the library, do an online search, find old cookbooks at flea markets and garage sales, ask family members, or find a reproduction of an old cookbook.
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