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Old 11-30-2017, 02:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
I believe any fat that is a solid at room temperature is shortening (as opposed to fats that are liquid at room temp, like vegetable and nut oils).
Shortening is hydrogenated soybean oil. Butter, coconut oil, or other solid fats are not. Plus, shortening is 100% fat. Butter is part fat and part water.
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Old 11-30-2017, 09:31 PM
Status: " la recherche d'un emploi" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: South Bay Native
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Shortening is hydrogenated soybean oil. Butter, coconut oil, or other solid fats are not. Plus, shortening is 100% fat. Butter is part fat and part water.
Quote:
Shortening is any fat that is a solid at room temperature and used to make crumbly pastry and other food products.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shortening
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Old 12-01-2017, 08:50 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DontH8Me View Post
I believe any fat that is a solid at room temperature is shortening (as opposed to fats that are liquid at room temp, like vegetable and nut oils).
Maybe so, but when you are baking and a recipe calls for shortning, it means Crisco or a Crisco-like product.

Other cooking fats can probably be substituted, but not always.
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Old 12-01-2017, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Middle America
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I've been using coconut oil lately, because I have it on hand, and it's worked fine for my particular recipes.
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Old 12-01-2017, 05:56 PM
Status: " la recherche d'un emploi" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: South Bay Native
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Maybe so, but when you are baking and a recipe calls for shortning, it means Crisco or a Crisco-like product.

Other cooking fats can probably be substituted, but not always.
I was responding to another poster who thought I needed to be corrected about the definition of shortening - not sure why you had to chime in on this?

I never used hydrogenated trans fats in my baked goods, regardless of the recipe. If I found a recipe or one was suggested to me and it called specifically for Crisco, I used butter, leaf lard, or another shortening in place of the Crisco. Results were just fine. I don't consider a recipe a rigid set of rules, I've been adapting and improvising for a few decades now and have yet to come across a failure because I subbed Crisco for butter or any other shortening. Which is exactly what the OP started this thread for.
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Old 12-04-2017, 11:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
No they are not all shortening. Perhaps you meant fat?


Maybe in cookbooks that came out recently, "shortening" only means hydrogenated vegetable oil. In the cookbooks I use, some of which came out over 100 years ago, Crisco had not yet been invented and "shortening" referred to any sort of fat that was solid at room temperature. I would not use bacon grease to replace butter in a cookie recipe unless the recipe was for bacon-scented cookies, but in the days when people used whatever they had available -- pig lard, beef tallow, goose grease, bacon drippings, or butter -- they all counted as shortening and were largely interchangeable. They still are. "Shortbread," for instance, originally called "shortening bread," is always made with real butter. The shortening is the butter, not Crisco.
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