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Old 12-12-2017, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,847,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
...there was a chef who swore that special pan for cooking popovers made all the difference.
I have a special pan for individual Yorkshire puddings, but a lot of people prefer the original sheet version of Yorkshire pudding. With the sheet version you get some light, fluffy portions along with the more dense portions.

Popover pan
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Old 12-12-2017, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
3,663 posts, read 5,828,255 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzpur View Post
I've been cooking Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding for Christmas dinner for literally years, now, and it always turns out very well. What I'm shooting for, though, is "perfect." And so, I have several questions...

I've never used the drippings from the roast. There just isn't enough. ..........
To get extra fat, in addition to the roast, I always buy a cheap, fatty piece of beef or fatty beef ribs and render the fat from it. (I then simmer it in water and use the resulting broth when I make gravy.)

I've tried using butter but there is no substitute for beef fat. The pudding turns out so much better. There is no comparison.
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Old 12-12-2017, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Baker City, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
I have a special pan for individual Yorkshire puddings, but a lot of people prefer the original sheet version of Yorkshire pudding. With the sheet version you get some light, fluffy portions along with the more dense portions.
I should probably buy a popover pan. I've been using a muffin pan and they turn out somewhat hollow which is a good thing. When the puddings cool a bit the tops open up and you can fill the puddings with gravy. People love it.
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Old 12-12-2017, 06:46 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
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I have a Yorkshire pudding pan that I bought in England. It's like a muffin tin but the indentations are shallower. It works better than trying to make it in a large pan if you're like me and not such a great cook. There's less chance of the pudding caving in.
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Old 12-12-2017, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Salt Lake City
21,877 posts, read 22,011,227 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
FWIW, I know on some show I've watched, possibly on one of Guy Fieri's Triple D outings, there was a chef who swore that special pan for cooking popovers made all the difference.
I've tried it in the form of popovers, but my family prefers it made in a large pan and then cut into pieces.
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Old 12-12-2017, 07:36 PM
 
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I think the drippings adhering to the bottom of the pudding is more important than how high it pops. You can make a big popover but it is not YP to me unless it is dripping beef fat and crusted on the bottom.
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Old 12-12-2017, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
11,012 posts, read 17,501,056 times
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I’ve only made Mollie Katzen’s popover recipe (in a muffin tin), never a proper Yorkshire pud with beef fat.

How many eggs do you use to 12 “muffins?” Her recipe calls for 2-4. Mine came out heavy but tasty (2 eggs). I don’t know if that’s too much egg, I didn’t beat them enough, the pan wasn’t hot enough, the pan was too shallow, or all of the above or some combo thereof.

Any advice from the experts?
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Old 12-13-2017, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Long Island,NY
1,013 posts, read 539,732 times
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Maybe a little cornstarch in the batter for more browning?
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Old 12-13-2017, 12:22 PM
Status: "Elect a clown? Expect a circus!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
58,073 posts, read 40,850,079 times
Reputation: 29748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
I have a special pan for individual Yorkshire puddings, but a lot of people prefer the original sheet version of Yorkshire pudding. With the sheet version you get some light, fluffy portions along with the more dense portions.

Popover pan

It was a while ago but I believe the pan looked somewhat like the one pictured, I can't swear to it but I have the feeling it may have had cast iron cups.
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Old 12-13-2017, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,847,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphfr View Post
Maybe a little cornstarch in the batter for more browning?
What????
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