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Old 05-06-2018, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,470 posts, read 20,811,102 times
Reputation: 18294

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I made a cake from scratch with a scratch made lemon curd filling and scratch made icing. too much work I did not like the way the lemon curd came out.
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Old 05-06-2018, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Mountain girl trapped on the beach
586 posts, read 686,723 times
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Croissants. The ingredients are no big deal but it took several recipes to get the rolling and folding down to the point where they were light and flaky and not soggy and greasy. It took me most of a year, making them once a month, and I threw a lot of them away but finally got it down.

My sister and I used to get together to make tamales. It was a lot of work but I miss those days.
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Old 05-06-2018, 07:20 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 1,836,228 times
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Making pancakes is a big deal for me. That is it, pancakes.
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Old 05-06-2018, 11:03 PM
 
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The most complex dish I believe I've ever made from scratch is the Uighur dish guiru lagman. To add to the level of complexity, the recipe was in Russian, in which I have limited proficiency.

This isn't the recipe I used but I believe it's very close.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1UQ7CFw3B4U

Either palak paneer or chicken schawarma might be the next most complicated thing I've made.
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Old 05-07-2018, 04:24 AM
 
Location: north central Ohio
8,422 posts, read 4,338,098 times
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Two that are Hungarian recipes from a Hungarian neighbor.
Chicken Paprikas with homemade egg dumplings
and Kifli (Hungarian Walnut Cookies) you cut the sour cream dough into small triangles, put a dab of the walnut, butter, sugar filling on each triangle and roll into crescents. They are supposed to be very small, but the more tired I get, the larger my crescents get! You then shake in a bag of powdered sugar. They are to die for!
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Old 05-07-2018, 12:39 PM
 
6,337 posts, read 2,278,027 times
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For me, Etoufe.
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Old 05-07-2018, 01:33 PM
 
6,229 posts, read 3,519,393 times
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This thread is too fun to read! I see many things in the list that I have tried or made part of my list of regulars, also. Some of them were wonderful but because of their time-consuming nature I modified so we could have them more often. But there was something to be said for doing it the "right" way first before fiddling with the recipe. Then I feel like I've paid my dues. And respect.

I never like to feel like I did "less than" because I wasn't able to do the authentic version. Kitchen ego. LOL.

When I read the question the first thing that came to mind was something I've been hungry for lately - Chicken Kiev. The ingredients aren't expensive or many but the dish is make or break in technique. Haven't made it for years and I don't know of any place where you can order it in a restaurant and get the real deal.

I also used to make a veal cordon bleu on wild rice pilaf with a mushroom sauce that took all day and really tooted its own horn. Then I found out how they produce veal.

Maybe the fussiest and most expensive dessert I ever made was for our Twenty-fifth Wedding Anniversary. It was a cold white chocolate, dark chocolate and fresh raspberry pie. Think it cost nearly fifteen dollars to make twenty-six years ago. I still remember how good it was!
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Old 05-07-2018, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
17,470 posts, read 20,811,102 times
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My mom's brioche rolls. Time consuming and labor intensive, Plus mine were not as buttery and puffy looking as hers. I don't think they rose enough. I made them once and I decided to let her make them since she has been doing it 30 years.
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Old 05-07-2018, 01:44 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
11,138 posts, read 20,301,881 times
Reputation: 26372
I make tamales every year. It got a lot easier when I got the Instant Pot.

A lot of my meals are complicated because I can't use store bought mayo, seasoning mixes, store bought bread or tortillas, bbq sauce, salsa, spaghetti sauce, basically anything that I used to use to save time.
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Old 05-07-2018, 03:47 PM
 
3 posts, read 835 times
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I love to make cakes for my family. I'll have them pick their favorite theme and make some kind of cake for them. I want to make shredded beef rolled tacos with queso fresco, salsa fresca, cilantro, chopped white onion, and roasted cactus. Mmmm. Good comfort food.


I want to make a green chile sauce and use the flower of the cactus, they look like small fat green potatoes. You take a 3-4# beef or pork roast and brown it on all sides. Keep it in the pan. In a blender add a large chopped white onion, a tablespoon of salt, de-seeded 6-8 jalepenos chopped (no vein or seeds) and put them in the blender with a handful or more if you like cilantro, cleaned and roots removed, a four garlic cloves or more and add just enough water to the blender in small increments so that you don't spray jalepeno juice all over the kitchen. Once the blender is full with enough water, cilantro, onion and garlic blend until the sauce is smooth, then pour all of it over the browned meat in pan. Turn the stove to medium to get the sauce to simmer. Let the roast simmer without over cooking it or drying it out. You can cook a roast X amount of minutes per pound. Check it out on Goggle. When the roast is fork tender, you can stick a fork in it the meat will fall off. This is a sign that the food is cooked. Spoon up some of those fat cactus flower potato looking things onto your large bowle and serve it with sliced meat and extra sauce on top of the flowers. Add Salt to taste. Enjoy with your favorite cerveza.
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