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Old 09-28-2018, 11:07 AM
 
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I am a bit puzzled. As I was going through chicken noodle soup recipes I see that there are a few recipes that list flour as one of there ingredients and others list corn starch. What is the difference that each would have on the outcome of the soup. Or should a person use both to be on the safe side.
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Old 09-28-2018, 11:36 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
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A person should use the one called for in the recipe.
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Old 09-28-2018, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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Corn starch cooks clear and flour cooks cloudy. Otherwise, they are interchangeable as a thickener. You would use half as much corn starch as you would flour, however.
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Old 09-28-2018, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now Rehoboth Beach, DE
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Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Corn starch cooks clear and flour cooks cloudy. Otherwise, they are interchangeable as a thickener. You would use half as much corn starch as you would flour, however.
And corn starch is fine for people with gluten free diets either sensitivity or celiacs.
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Old 09-28-2018, 01:12 PM
 
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Here's a tip: Make your pie crust with flour, of course, but before filling it give the lower crust a dusting of cornstarch and you'll have a crisper bottom crust.

Some people use corn starch to make their gravy but I've always preferred flour. It's important to then "cook" the flour for a minute or so to get a better taste and thickness. But if you cook it too long or at too high of a heat you will risk separating the fat from your gravy and end up with, um, greasy gravy. Sounds like a nickname.

It's easier to make a sauce that doesn't turn lumpy using cornstarch. You can dissolve it in a little liquid before adding it and stir it in well for a smooth sauce.

Flour is a little more tricky. This you may want to stir into warm fat or drippings before adding your liquid. And keep stirring now and then or you'll get "dumplings" in your gravy. I use a spoon to stir the edges of the pan and a wire whisk for the bulk of the gravy. Some beginner cooks solve the problem by shaking the flour and drippings in a jar before adding to the pan.

Cornstarch is what gives that jewel-like quality to Asian/American sauces such as sweet and sour.
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Old 09-28-2018, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Phoenix,Arizona
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
A person should use the one called for in the recipe.

I'd agree


A simple Flour/Rue is a great tool, 1 part flour & 1 Part Butter on low heat until golden brown
stirring or whisking constantly.
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Old 09-30-2018, 07:09 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nickerman View Post
I am a bit puzzled. As I was going through chicken noodle soup recipes I see that there are a few recipes that list flour as one of there ingredients and others list corn starch. What is the difference that each would have on the outcome of the soup. Or should a person use both to be on the safe side.
I use flour if I want to make a roux, 1 part flour to 1 part fat(ie oil, butter, bacon grease, etc). Flour needs the "flour" taste cooked out of it so usually added toward the beginning of a recipe.

I use corn starch to thicken a soup after I've been cooking, added broth, and don't like the consistency. Mix about 1 part cold water to 1 part corn starch, mix, then add to soup/broth.

Both need brought to a boil then you can reduce heat if needed.

Hope this helps. I'm not a chef, just what I've learned over the years.
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Old 09-30-2018, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
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When I want to thicken a sauce quickly I use cornstarch. It's fast, easy and rarely lumps. I typically use flour for gravy and recipes that specifically call for it.

Quick tip for mixing flour and cornstarch with liquids: Add liquids to corn starch; add flour to liquids. I don't recall where I read this tip, but it works for me. This is for sauces and gravies only--NOT baking.

BTW--kind of weird to me that a chicken noodle soup recipe includes flour or cornstarch. Maybe I've never seen it in a recipe because I don't use one for chicken noodle soup. The noodles, if cooked in the broth, thicken the soup more or less depending on the type of noodles.
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Old 09-30-2018, 07:45 AM
 
Location: The Mitten
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Originally Posted by Mouser View Post
I'd agree


A simple Flour/Rue is a great tool, 1 part flour & 1 Part Butter on low heat until golden brown
stirring or whisking constantly.
Making a Roux has been a game changer for most of my stews, soups, sauces, and chili. It adds such a creamy texture and adds more of a robust flavor to whatever I making, then say flour and water; or corn starch and milk.

I still use either when I'm out of flour or butter, but I usually will have both on hand.
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Old 09-30-2018, 08:10 AM
 
Location: The Mitten
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Humble and Kind View Post
I use flour if I want to make a roux, 1 part flour to 1 part fat(ie oil, butter, bacon grease, etc). Flour needs the "flour" taste cooked out of it so usually added toward the beginning of a recipe.

I use corn starch to thicken a soup after I've been cooking, added broth, and don't like the consistency. Mix about 1 part cold water to 1 part corn starch, mix, then add to soup/broth.

Both need brought to a boil then you can reduce heat if needed.

Hope this helps. I'm not a chef, just what I've learned over the years.
This is great information. Especially the part about a roux can be made with bacon grease! I just thought that a roux was always butter and flour.
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