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Old 04-26-2012, 05:03 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
71,717 posts, read 83,329,873 times
Reputation: 41545

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
I actually prefer my veggies frozen. They end up with a fresher flavor and texture, IMO.

I used to pressure can my veggies, but one year, I pressure canned sixty-some quarts of peas - and anyone who has ever processed a lot of peas knows how time-consuming that would have been, all that shelling.

Well, anyway, the results were horrible. The peas were extremely starchy and just did NOT taste good. I am almost obsessive about not wasting food, but the chickens ended up getting all those peas that I worked so hard for.

From then on, I blanched and froze all my veggies - peas, beans, carrots, etc.

I even prefer freezing my tomatoes - it is very easy to do and it's very convenient to just take out as many as I need for my chili or stew or whatever I might want to throw a few handfuls of chopped, frozen tomatoes in (I also freeze them whole).

The Weck is great, though, for all high acid foods - like fruits and pickles.

I'd like to do a little more with my dehydrator this year. We'll see.
I do still like my canned tomatoes but the peas, OMG. I can remember shelling just enough for dinner when we were kids and that was fun, but timely. To shell enough for 61 quarts, even 12 quarts would be a pain. yes, blanching and freezing is the best way to go. Now, I can't believe we are talking about canning again, it is exciting, knowing the season is only a few months away...
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Old 04-27-2012, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Michigan
859 posts, read 1,898,372 times
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yup Beans and peas get frozen so does Corn, put all that up with the Foodsaver.
Man I wish it would warm up and stay warm !
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:03 AM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,663,824 times
Reputation: 6459
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasmin71 View Post
yup Beans and peas get frozen so does Corn, put all that up with the Foodsaver.
I bought a Foodsaver at a garage sale about a year and a half ago for five bucks but I've never even used it.

Every time I go to buy the bags, I choke on the price.

I have always used zip lock bags that I can wash and re-use. In fact, I double-bag whatever I'm freezing by putting it first in either pint or quart bags (since there is just two of us here, pints are usually adequate) and then I put those bags inside another zip lock gallon bag. I do this with store-bought meats, too - instead of just putting the package of meat in the freezer in its store packaging, I will slip it inside a gallon zip lock freezer bag first.
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Old 04-27-2012, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
71,717 posts, read 83,329,873 times
Reputation: 41545
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
I bought a Foodsaver at a garage sale about a year and a half ago for five bucks but I've never even used it.

Every time I go to buy the bags, I choke on the price.

I have always used zip lock bags that I can wash and re-use. In fact, I double-bag whatever I'm freezing by putting it first in either pint or quart bags (since there is just two of us here, pints are usually adequate) and then I put those bags inside another zip lock gallon bag. I do this with store-bought meats, too - instead of just putting the package of meat in the freezer in its store packaging, I will slip it inside a gallon zip lock freezer bag first.
I am glad to hear you say that cause I have be toying with the idea of buying one. Usually I get my zip locks at Sams, sure they are not totally air tight, but cost is a factor and like use, often I re-use my bags. I don't do it all the time....
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Old 04-27-2012, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Somewhere out there
9,616 posts, read 11,344,497 times
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Wink Meat canning beginner!

I just finally bought myself an American Canner Co. large & seriously professional (!) pressure cooker unit that will hold those nice 12" tall half-gallon Ball jars. I want to put up some chickens this year, starting with the 5 or 7 fine old girls who have outlived their egg producing lives (they are >>+ 3.5 yrs old and only produce about 2 eggs/week, versus their young (> 8 mo old) girlfriends in the coop, who lay, reliably right now, 6 - 7 eggs a week. I even had one produce 2 eggs in 18 hours!

They are nice and very social ladies, put they are only livestock I keep telling myself (hint: never name any animals you may later want to process into food!) and I don't want to just keep feeding them ($$$$!) like pets when I really can't bring 'em in to cuddle on my lap when I'm watching TV! Esp. when it's a documentary on egg or chicken farming!)

But those old girls, I've been told, can be very tough! I'll still just bet that two or three hours in that pressure cooker @ 15psi, with some spices and a touch of balsamic vinegar to begin with, will soften them up! Then I'm going to debone them and put the meat into those half-gallon Ball jars and figure out the right processing time (The USDA does not provide times for 1.2 gal jar processing!).

They will of course already be cooked, so any ideas on necessary simple processing time? Probably not too long, huh?? Just enough to bring it all up to temp to be sterile, and to get the jars hot enough to ensure they will then seal when cooled.

We'll be canning a lot of our vegetables this summer and fall, avoiding the necessity for freezer use, since who knows if the grid system might not suffer some temporary or longer-term failures in the future?
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Old 04-28-2012, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
71,717 posts, read 83,329,873 times
Reputation: 41545
Quote:
Originally Posted by rifleman View Post
I just finally bought myself an American Canner Co. large & seriously professional (!) pressure cooker unit that will hold those nice 12" tall half-gallon Ball jars. I want to put up some chickens this year, starting with the 5 or 7 fine old girls who have outlived their egg producing lives (they are >>+ 3.5 yrs old and only produce about 2 eggs/week, versus their young (> 8 mo old) girlfriends in the coop, who lay, reliably right now, 6 - 7 eggs a week. I even had one produce 2 eggs in 18 hours!

They are nice and very social ladies, put they are only livestock I keep telling myself (hint: never name any animals you may later want to process into food!) and I don't want to just keep feeding them ($$$$!) like pets when I really can't bring 'em in to cuddle on my lap when I'm watching TV! Esp. when it's a documentary on egg or chicken farming!)

But those old girls, I've been told, can be very tough! I'll still just bet that two or three hours in that pressure cooker @ 15psi, with some spices and a touch of balsamic vinegar to begin with, will soften them up! Then I'm going to debone them and put the meat into those half-gallon Ball jars and figure out the right processing time (The USDA does not provide times for 1.2 gal jar processing!).

They will of course already be cooked, so any ideas on necessary simple processing time? Probably not too long, huh?? Just enough to bring it all up to temp to be sterile, and to get the jars hot enough to ensure they will then seal when cooled.

We'll be canning a lot of our vegetables this summer and fall, avoiding the necessity for freezer use, since who knows if the grid system might not suffer some temporary or longer-term failures in the future?
Thinking about your poor old hens reminds me of years ago when our son decided to get into the chicken business. he was about 9 and very good at wheeling and dealing, even then so he managed to get about 6 chickens without paying a penny. Well one happened to be an old roaster who had one goal in life and that was to let the world know (at least our neighborhood) when it was time to wake up each morning, his time not ours. Finally after about 6 months of this we decided Mr Rooster had to go. Son, being a typical boy decided he and his best friend would do the task. They cut his head off I think but I can't remember that part for sures. Anyway when Mr rooster was no longer living we plucked him (I had helped my aunt do this as a kid) and we decided to stew him. Well, let my tell you, all the tenderizer in the world would not have made Mr Rooster eatable. I think we got a few bites from the breast. I cooked him from early morning until about 6 or 7 at night, tough as a board. son decided to stick with hens, the problem there: he was bartering for bannies. Have you ever tried to make a meal out of a Banny chicken egg?
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Old 04-28-2012, 09:56 AM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,953 posts, read 8,663,824 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Well, let my tell you, all the tenderizer in the world would not have made Mr Rooster eatable.
LOL This ^^

This reminds me of my own experience with roosters.

I used to raise meat birds every year (the Cornish X - which have been developed to grow fast and fat). They were wonderful and very tasty.

Well, I used to take them to a processor (couldn't kill them myself) and one time I decided to round up half a dozen or so extra roosters I had running around the place and take them in as well. The roosters were just some mixed breed layer types.

What a waste of processing fee! They were horrible, total contrast to the nice, meaty Cornish X I took in at the same time).

It was like the roosters had NO meat - just stringy muscle all over. Seriously, there wasn't enough on those suckers to even get a good broth!

And these weren't old birds - all of them were under a year.

Old hens might be different because they aren't as active as young roosters and perhaps they retain more of the meatiness. I couldn't tell you for sure because I've never butchered any of my layers - they end up dying of natural causes (or predators) instead.
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Old 04-29-2012, 06:12 AM
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,517 posts, read 26,319,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
I bought a Foodsaver at a garage sale about a year and a half ago for five bucks but I've never even used it.

Every time I go to buy the bags, I choke on the price.

I'm not sure if their prices are still good since I loaded up a few years ago and still have bags. This is were I get my FoodSaver bags from. They have all kinds.

foodsaver vacuum sealer bags
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Old 04-30-2012, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Michigan
859 posts, read 1,898,372 times
Reputation: 458
I love my Foodsaver........ bags are more but well worth it, I dont wash my old bags out sorry....not into that.

Foodsaver Food lasts here a LOT longer without Freezer Burn But hey thats what works for me I buy mine either at Walmart or Sams Club
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Old 04-30-2012, 09:10 AM
 
Location: somewhere in the woods
16,885 posts, read 13,004,681 times
Reputation: 5211
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasmin71 View Post
I do a lot of canning, Peaches, Pears, Tomatos ( all with peppers & onion), Appple sauce, Apple butter, jellys, Apple Pie in a Jar,

this year I am also gonna do Corn, Salsa and some other things.

What do you Cann?

I do both pressure and water bath canning. meats, stews, veggies, fruits, jams and lots of other foods as well.
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