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Old 10-05-2008, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Durham
1,032 posts, read 3,558,670 times
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So as many of you know I'm a huge fan of my Farmer's Market, and I'm always trying to expand my food horizons.

Over the past few weeks, both lima beans and a variety of beans called "pinkeyes" have been available.

I mixed up the limas into a succotash with the last sweet corn of the season, but these peas - I don't know how to cook them.

I asked some of the folks that were selling them; and I got "just like black eyed peas" (I didn't have the heart to tell her I'd never even tasted black eyed peas, much less knew how to cook them) and another said "with bacon".

I tasted one; and like the fresh lima beans, they absolutely need to be cooked; there will be no eating these raw.

So do you boil them, and then drain them, and then toss then in a pan of bacon? That's what I planned, but wanted advice first. Some of the recipes I see on line seem to be for dried peas - and these are fresh.

I was planning on keeping it simple; peas, bacon and maybe some garlic - but again, I see lots of recipes calling for all manner of spices, sometimes vegetables - another was talking about the "likker"....I don't even know what the finished dish is supposed to look like!

I need help!!
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Old 10-05-2008, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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For southern style blackeye or other types of cow peas cook them slow for an hour or so with some white bacon or salt pork. Just add enough water to keep them covered. You do not need to drain. Never heard of using garlic with them but I guess you could. I like garlic but not in my peas. We serve this out of the pot and top off with hot pepper sauce. Basically vinegar with hot peppers soaked in it. For seasoning meat you can also use small cubes of smoked ham if you prefer. They must be done and not crunchy or they will not taste right at all.

Oh the licquer is the liquid in the bottom of the bowl that is a delight with cornbread.
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Old 10-05-2008, 08:18 PM
 
Location: Heading to the NW, 4 sure.
4,470 posts, read 6,843,158 times
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Always on New Years Eve...yummm. I likeum with Ham Hocks and cooked till that gravy gets thick and with corn bread. Oh, baby....I have always used dried though...
My favorite canned is "Trappeys" they have a few different types...

HW...
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Old 10-05-2008, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
187,012 posts, read 76,918,736 times
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The difference in fresh and dry is the same as spit pea soup and having fresh green English peas. No comparison in flavors. Same product but different maturity and tastes. Dried blackeye peas with hog jowl is a new years good luck dish for many. Personally I only had to find a tooth once in mine and have used lean smoked have ever since. My late mother in law was a firm believer you must have the dried blackeyes and hog jowl every new years day.
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Old 10-05-2008, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Durham
1,032 posts, read 3,558,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
For southern style blackeye or other types of cow peas cook them slow for an hour or so with some white bacon or salt pork. Just add enough water to keep them covered. You do not need to drain.
Wait, what...an hour? For fresh peas?? And the bacon goes in the water? Boiled bacon?
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Old 10-05-2008, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Simmer for an hour on low heat. Yes the bacon simmers in with the peas. A real treat. If you have a few what are called snaps (immature pods that can't be shelled out) break them like green beans and add them to the mix. Keep covered while cooking and don't let them run out of liquid. You can buy bags of frozen field peas with snaps but they are not nearly as good and fresh shelled at home. Process peas must be more mature for the sheller to work and by then the best flavor has left the peas. A smoked ham hock is good seasoning too.
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Old 10-05-2008, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Floribama
15,031 posts, read 31,400,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arsbadmojo View Post
Wait, what...an hour? For fresh peas?? And the bacon goes in the water? Boiled bacon?
If you don't like the idea of boiled bacon you can use ham, or ham hocks.
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Old 10-06-2008, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Durham
1,032 posts, read 3,558,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
If you don't like the idea of boiled bacon you can use ham, or ham hocks.
Well, bacon is what I have handy, so that's what I'll use. It doesn't sound great, I'll admit, but I'll try anything - I just wanted to make sure I was reading that right.

When these are done, are they in a 'sauce' like baked beans, or do they absorb all the liquid, or do you sort of strain them with a slotted spoon when serving?

I know these may seem like dumb questions, but you've got to remember I've never had them before and have no idea what to shoot for.
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Old 10-06-2008, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Just a few miles outside of St. Louis
1,921 posts, read 5,168,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arsbadmojo View Post
Well, bacon is what I have handy, so that's what I'll use. It doesn't sound great, I'll admit, but I'll try anything - I just wanted to make sure I was reading that right.

When these are done, are they in a 'sauce' like baked beans, or do they absorb all the liquid, or do you sort of strain them with a slotted spoon when serving?

I know these may seem like dumb questions, but you've got to remember I've never had them before and have no idea what to shoot for.

Trust Southernnaturelover, he's right! Bacon is great in blackeyed peas! That's how I fix them, (I also cook my greenbeans the same way). I don't do the garlic thing, although I do use garlic salt. The fat on the bacon is what really adds the good flavor, in my opinion. You can use ham, but I don't think it tastes quite as good.

I use a slotted spoon to drain off the excess liquid, but I guess that's a personal thing. Some folks like the extra liquid, so they can sop it up. Oh, and cook up some cornbread to go with the peas! On New Year's Day, that's what we have, black-eyed peas and cornbread.Yummy! Don't forget the dime, on that day, either!
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Old 10-06-2008, 10:14 AM
 
Location: The Big D
14,874 posts, read 37,269,481 times
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Yes, raw bacon boiled in w/ the black-eyed peas. But don't just throw whole strips of it into it to cook. Cut or tear it up into smaller pieces. This way when you eat it you only see small specks of bacon (or ham) in the peas. You can also add some small chopped onions (doesn't require much of these at all) and of course salt & pepper. You want the "sauce" to be thick but not gloppy thick. It is still a "liquid". Some people pour the sauce over cornbread. We don't use a slotted spoon much unless one of the kids just does not like the liquid from the peas blending into their other foods.
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