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Old 04-27-2013, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,394 posts, read 59,890,532 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taurus430 View Post
You might be right technically, but to me and the chefs I see on the food shows (Mario Batalia and others), they say the same that I posted, that they basically are the same.
They're just trying to make you think they are great and accomplished chefs (which they are not). The corn for grits is processed differently from simple corn meal; polenta is nothing more than that.

Polenta is the Italian word for corn meal mush. There is nothing fancy about it. Like grits, polenta is an inexpensive way for a family to stretch its food budget.
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Old 04-27-2013, 04:45 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
1,448 posts, read 2,590,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ella Parr View Post
With all due respect, grits and polenta are not the same thing. Both are corn, but polenta is corn ground into meal (basic corn meal) while grits are ground hominy (the corn is turned into hominy, dried, and then ground). They are two different products with different flavors.
Quote:
Originally Posted by taurus430 View Post
You might be right technically, but to me and the chefs I see on the food shows (Mario Batalia and others), they say the same that I posted, that they basically are the same. I've had both and to me, do not have different flavors.

I second Ella Parr's comment. Or rather, I third it, since Ohiogirl was faster than I in the response.

During our seven years living in Italy, I was taught how to cook Italian food in Italian kitchens all over Central and Southern Italy, by close to 60 Italian mothers, grandmothers, and great-grandmothers (none of them was mine by blood or marriage.) When we returned to the States, I didn't recognize the food prepared by Italian-American chefs on American cooking shows. Are they great chefs? They must have been, for all the fame and respect they've received outside of Italy. Are they authentic Italian chefs? I doubt it. The food they prepared (in the few shows that I watched since we don't have a TV) were Italian-American food, to appeal to what the chefs thought the average Americans would prefer. Those dishes would be laughed right out of an Italian kitchen in Italy.

As far as polenta vs. grits goes, let's just say that saying they both are the same is not unlike saying Chinese and Japanese are the same, or Britons, Welsh, and Scots are the same. Wars were declared over much lesser offense than that.

Last edited by Ol' Wanderer; 04-27-2013 at 05:30 PM..
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Old 04-28-2013, 01:31 PM
 
14,264 posts, read 24,013,182 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Polenta is the Italian word for corn meal mush. There is nothing fancy about it. Like grits, polenta is an inexpensive way for a family to stretch its food budget.

I was at a small boutique market outside of Cleveland. They had a 2# stick of corn mush for 99 cents wrapped in waxed paper like a stick of butter.

Right next to it was a 1# stick of polenta for $2.69.
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Old 05-31-2014, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,255 posts, read 8,323,304 times
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Default Really Good Grits.

One cup uncooked grits (NOT instant)
Two Cups Water
Two Cups Organic Milk
Half Stick Butter (1/4 cup butter)
Two Knorrs Chicken Bouillon Cubes (No substitutions, it must be Knorrs.

Melt butter in heavy pot, add water and milk to simmering. Add bouillon and dissolve.

Add in grits and bring to boil. Turn to medium heat stirring often until thick and bubbly, about 8 minutes.

I like to put grated cheese on top and in the bottom of my plate.

You can also sauté bacon and substitute bacon and bacon fat for butter.
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Old 05-31-2014, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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Some might say "good grits" is an oxymoron, but properly seasoned grits can be the perfect culinary accompaniment to a main course.
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Old 05-31-2014, 11:21 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,172 posts, read 54,228,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Some might say "good grits" is an oxymoron, but properly seasoned grits can be the perfect culinary accompaniment to a main course.

I totally agree with the bolded part!
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Old 06-01-2014, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
9,255 posts, read 8,323,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Some might say "good grits" is an oxymoron, but properly seasoned grits can be the perfect culinary accompaniment to a main course.
Yes, unseasoned grits taste like ass!
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Old 06-02-2014, 01:00 AM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,446 posts, read 10,916,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
...unseasoned grits taste like ass!
LOL - poorly prepared "chitlins" is as close as I've been to that culinary experience.
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Old 06-02-2014, 09:17 AM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,172 posts, read 54,228,730 times
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I grew up eating grits. My mother was English from the Bahamas. Bananas squashed up in grits with salt and butter is great..especially for kids. I prefer mine savory (salt, pepper, butter, and lots of cheddar cheese).
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Old 06-02-2014, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,485 posts, read 43,812,291 times
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Once you've tried stone ground grits you will not go back to regular grits. I make cheese grits casserole or souffle for every holiday meal. And many times in between.
Girls are having End of Grade tests this week and have been told to eat a good hot breakfast all week. Both requested the cheese grits casserole I make. I also add a dash of Lea and Perrins and Lawry's seasoned salt. I simply cook my grits in chicken broth instead of water.
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