U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink > Recipes
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-23-2012, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Lone Star State to Peach State
3,798 posts, read 3,491,474 times
Reputation: 6889

Advertisements

How do ya'll fix your grits???
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-13-2013, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,474 posts, read 43,574,205 times
Reputation: 47214
Default World Grits Festival

Not just Southerners are enjoying grits. I make a mean cheese grits casserole especially for holiday meals and my family would riot without it.

World Grits Festival: 5 Savory Recipes - ABC News
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2013, 10:40 AM
 
14,199 posts, read 23,890,046 times
Reputation: 19919
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Not just Southerners are enjoying grits. I make a mean cheese grits casserole especially for holiday meals and my family would riot without it.

World Grits Festival: 5 Savory Recipes - ABC News


I have served my cheesy grits at many a church dinners in Northern Illinois and have always run out!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2013, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
71,700 posts, read 83,272,206 times
Reputation: 41535
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Not just Southerners are enjoying grits. I make a mean cheese grits casserole especially for holiday meals and my family would riot without it.

World Grits Festival: 5 Savory Recipes - ABC News
sounds so good. I had grits about a month or so ago when out for breakfast but don't get them often. I don't know why, I love them, especially when they have a lot of bad for me stuff mixed in...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2013, 01:31 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,159 posts, read 54,011,527 times
Reputation: 163212
Grits! Real people food!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2013, 07:07 PM
 
Location: California Mountains
1,448 posts, read 2,579,367 times
Reputation: 2331
We attended World Grits Festival every year when we lived in SC and bought a sample from every vendor there. However, the best grits we've ever purchase did not come from the festival but from State Farmers Market in Raleigh, NC. Hands down the best in the South. Since we moved back to CA, I've been buying grits online (mostly Bob's Red Mill) and at specialty stores, but never could find anything close to the perfection of the one in Raleigh.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2013, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,837,575 times
Reputation: 28187
I'm a Suth'n-Fried Brit but I never acquired a taste for hominy or grits. Now, breakfast semolina with a squirt of warmed grape jelly - oh yeah.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-27-2013, 01:50 AM
 
874 posts, read 494,551 times
Reputation: 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by taurus430 View Post
Grits and polenta (Italian), same thing. From what I know about polenta, it needs to be served once cooked or it sets up, quick. Italians spread it in a sheet pan, cool it, slice and fry it if not eating it creamy style. I like it with butter and parmesan cheese.
Sweet Shrimp with Soft Polenta Recipe : Mario Batali : Recipes : Food Network
With all due respect, grits and polenta are not the same thing. Both are corn, but polenta is corn ground into meal (basic corn meal) while grits are ground hominy (the corn is turned into hominy, dried, and then ground). They are two different products with different flavors.

Ella
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-27-2013, 10:11 AM
 
Location: NJ
2,111 posts, read 7,245,137 times
Reputation: 994
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ella Parr View Post
With all due respect, grits and polenta are not the same thing. Both are corn, but polenta is corn ground into meal (basic corn meal) while grits are ground hominy (the corn is turned into hominy, dried, and then ground). They are two different products with different flavors.

Ella
You might be right technically, but to me and the chefs I see on the food shows (Mario Batalia and others), they say the same that I posted, that they basically are the same. I've had both and to me, do not have different flavors.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-27-2013, 03:05 PM
 
874 posts, read 494,551 times
Reputation: 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by taurus430 View Post
You might be right technically, but to me and the chefs I see on the food shows (Mario Batalia and others), they say the same that I posted, that they basically are the same. I've had both and to me, do not have different flavors.
I'm sorry. I didn't mean to offend you. Since I come from Grits Country (the deep south), I find the distinction important. Yes, I, too, have heard some of the chefs use the terms interchangeably. However, not Paula Deen .

Polenta is the Spanish word for "corn meal". Now when one buys a bag of corn meal, it has the subtitle of "polenta". That is a fairly recent addition to the bag (a few decades). Before the advent of "polenta", it was just "corn meal". It has always been boiled in water to make a thick side dish, but instead of being called "polenta", it was called "cornmeal mush" or just "mush". It was a staple dish of the extremely poor and was routinely served to prisoners, mental patients, and other wards of the state. Commonly, it was served in a bowl and eaten like any hot cereal, and sadly, was usually a stand-alone dish. It was "back then", and is now, one of the cheapest dishes one can cook. That doesn't change with the name.

Restaurants were not serving boiled corn meal when it was called "mush", but once someone hit on the idea of using the Spanish name of "polenta", it became this new, chic, trendy, hotsy totsy side dish that people were paying a fortune for in big, fancy restaurants. How do chefs keep a straight face?

I wonder how many sales they would have had of plates of:
Three succulent lamb medallions served with two crispy green beans and two crispy carrot spears, and a serving of luscious cornmeal mush.....................................39.95

Well, again, sorry. The whole polenta/grits thing is so different. It is just one of those things where it should be separated.

Ella
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Food and Drink > Recipes
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:56 AM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top