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Old 01-25-2010, 08:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 60'sGal View Post
This has nothing to do with cooking, but a friend of mine has an actaul article that appeared in "Good Housekeeping" back in the very early 50's. It was an article discussing the many uses of Lysol. One was the suggestion that it worked well for feminine hygiene and stressed that women keeping themselves fresh in that area was just as important as keeping a spotless house, cooking wonderful meals, greeting her weary, hardworking husband at the door with slippers and a cocktail and never, never complaining about her hard day until AFTER he had his cocktail, a good meal, had read the evening news and was comfy on the sofa.

I kid you not.
I've seen that article, it's pretty funny. There is a modern-day version that someone wrote up in response, with the hubby having to do all that---hilarious. I don't remember the Lyson bit though, I would definitely draw the line at "freshening up" with that.
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Old 01-25-2010, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Yipe. The thought of Lysol anywhere near those dainty girly parts just makes me cringe!

Quote:
never complaining about her hard day until AFTER he had his cocktail, a good meal, had read the evening news and was comfy on the sofa.
And then you could let the complaints rip. LOL
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Old 01-25-2010, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
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Andthentherewere3, Sorry, as the wood cookstoves that my mother and grandmother cooked on had thermometers in set into the oven doors, I forgot that some stoves did not have them. Thanks for the reminder. Even with the thermomoter, I could never keep the temperature regulated.
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Old 01-25-2010, 09:55 AM
 
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I'm sorry to keep posting on this thread, I just find the subject fascinating. This discussion prompted me to look up old cookstoves. Those poor housewives, how they ever managed to bake anything well is beyond me, it was hard work. Look at the description I found for using those old ovens:

WKR FAQS oven operation (http://www.goodtimestove.com/store/pg/378-WKR-FAQS-oven-operation.html - broken link)



Understanding all the functions of the range permits the thrifty housewife to get the most out of it with the least effort.
USE OF THE OVEN

The real test of the range is in the baking. Nothing but individual experience is a safe guide in the handling any particular range, but the general principle is the same.
When the fire is first started, the flames rush over the top of the oven and thence directly to the chimney. This heats the top of the oven, while the bottom remains comparatively cool.
The entire oven must be heated and the body of fire must be sufficient to maintain an even heat for a considerable length of time. The oven becomes evenly heated by closing the oven damper, forcing the flames and smoke down one side and under the oven, entirely around and up again to reach the chimney. Foods prepared for baking or roasting differs widely in the time and temperature required for cooking. A little practice will determine the correct temperature and best location in the oven for different bakes.
In a coal range, baking is done directly on the bottom of the oven or on the raised rack. Never attempt to bake with the rack placed on the bottom of the oven. In gas ovens, however, baking is not done on the bottom of the oven, but only on the raised racks.
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Old 01-25-2010, 11:40 AM
 
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And thentherewere3: keep posting! 60s gal -- thanks! That's one use for Lysol I've never heard. Some advertising, huh?
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Old 01-26-2010, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Another book in the collection is dated 1949, but it's just as much fun. Lots of neat pictures. It's a home ec textbook called "Food for Better Living," a collaboration of a bunch of home ec teachers from public school districts. A lot of the book concentrates on nutrition, menu preparation and serving, and, of course, good manners. There's even a chapter on that newfangled idea of freezing food to preserve it.

The recipes aren't that outrageous, for the most part; what you would expect in a basic cookbook, especially one from the 40s or 50s. Lots of gelatin recipes. One popular post-war concoction, Glorified Rice, is in here:

2 c cooked rice
1 c drained crushed pineapple
1/4 lb. marshmallows, cut in quarters
1/2 c cream, whipped
1/4 c sugar
1 t vanilla

Mix gently 1 c pineapple, 1/4 lb. marshmallows, 1/4 c sugar, and 2 c rice. Whip 1/2 c cream, add 1 t vanilla, and fold into rice mixture. Let stand in the refrigerator 4 hours before serving. Serve in sherbet glasses.

And what home ec class would be complete without the preparation of a beautiful Tomato Aspic?

2 c tomato juice
1 slice medium-sized onion
1 whole clove
small piece bay leaf
1/2 t salt
2 T unflavored gelatin
2 T sugar
1/4 t paprika
1/4 c cold water
2 T mild vinegar or lemon juice

Place 2 c tomato juice, 1 slice onion, 1 clove, pice of bay leaf, and 1/2 t salt in a saucepan; cook for 10 minutes, and remove from heat. Soak 2 T gelatin in 1/4 c cold water for five minutes. Add 2 T sugar, 1/4 t paprika, and the gelatin to the tomato mixture, and stir until dissolved; strain. Rinse the salad mold or individual molds in cold water and pour in the tomato mixture. Chill in the refrigerator until firm. Unmold and place on the salad greens; garnish with mayonnaise or cooked salad dressing. Celery curls and carrot strips add variety and look very attractive.

Plus there's a diagram for the Basic 7 Food Groups:

leafy green and yellow vegetables (one or more servings daily);
citrus fruits, tomatoes, raw cabbage (one or more servings);
potatoes and other vegetables and fruits (two or more servings);
milk, cheese, ice cream ( three to four cups milk for children, two for adults);
meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dried peans, beans (one to two servings);
bread, flour, cereals, whole grain or enriched (every day); and
butter and fortified margarine (some daily).

Seems a little like the modern food pyramid, doesn't it?
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Old 01-26-2010, 06:08 PM
 
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Love the cookbooks from the 50s! Thanks for posting.
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Old 01-26-2010, 10:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juniperbleu View Post
In an old cookbook from the '30s I saw a recipe for "City Chicken" where the "chicken" was actually veal. Apparently it was a cheaper chicken alternative at the time?
City Chicken is still found in the western NY area and down along the lakes to OH. What we have here is 5-6 cubes ( maybe 1 1/2" square on skewers), alternating pork and veal. Rolled in flour and sauteed in oil until browned and cooked, you use the oil drippings to make great gravy with flour/water mix and spices (your choice).

It is often served over kluski noodles.

I never knew what it was until a Pennsylvania friend made some for me.
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Old 01-26-2010, 10:34 PM
 
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How about applesauce? My grandmother made it with at least half a bushel of apples at a time ( huge family /what was left over got taken for the grandchildren).

Her handwritten note couldn't be simpler: "Buy nice firm sweet apples. Quarter and core them (do not peel). Put in a stockpot with enough water to come halfway up the apples. When soft, put only apples in the strainer and use the pestle to turn the soft apples into sauce. Save the leftovers in the icebox" (Yes, she had an icebox, even when she had a refrigerator)

My Grandmother was born 1880 and has a family of 10 to feed. When all of us grandchildren came, there were often 30 at a holiday meal. On holidays, she used a bushel of apples -- never specific as to a type, it was just firm sweet apples -- and with the skin left on, it was lovely and pink. I have her perforated cone "strainer" now with a very well worn wooden pestle -- it has 3 detachable feet and will stand over a pot. You throw in the soft cooked apples and grind them into sauce, pushing the pestle against the side in a circular movement and picking out the skins and seeds left behind. That worn pestle is quite a testament to many hours of cooking.

I think she also mashed potaoes and squashes with it. She never peeled potatoes either, convinced all the "good things" were in the peel (Amazing that now you get mashed potatoes with peels -- Grandma was right
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Old 01-26-2010, 11:33 PM
 
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How wonderful that you have the note and the kitchen tools. Thanks for sharing.
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