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Old 01-27-2010, 03:47 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
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Y'all just had to go and do it didn't ya? Homade applesauce. I can taste it now. Mom made the best applesauce stack cake by baking 8" buscuit rounds and spreading applesauce over each layer. Thanks for bringing that memory back.
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Old 01-27-2010, 05:49 AM
 
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More great recipes! Do you have your mother's applesauce stack cake recipe, masonsdaughter?

I remember when the new "modern" food pyramid guide came out, some time in the 80's, I think. I never did get used to it, in my head I still think of the food groups guide instead.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post

Plus there's a diagram for the Basic 7 Food Groups:

leafy green and yellow vegetables (one or more servings daily);
citrus fruits, tomatoes, raw cabbage (one or more servings);
potatoes and other vegetables and fruits (two or more servings);
milk, cheese, ice cream ( three to four cups milk for children, two for adults);
meat, poultry, fish, eggs, dried peans, beans (one to two servings);
bread, flour, cereals, whole grain or enriched (every day); and
butter and fortified margarine (some daily).

Seems a little like the modern food pyramid, doesn't it?
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Old 01-27-2010, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Couldn't find a legible image of the Basic 7 food groups wheel that was in my book, but here's a link to the history of the USDA food pyramid:

USDA Food Pyramid History
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Old 01-27-2010, 08:58 AM
 
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A couple of comments. Unless a person was an apartment dweller, most folks had gardens, and would have Irish moss available for most of the year. There are many medicinal herbs that are also decorative and most gardeners would have included them in either culinary gardens or perennial beds. I have it growing in my garden, although just for decorative purposes.

My mother learned to cook on a wood stove and she taught me. The way to gauge the temperature without a thermometer is by feel. Open the oven door and stick your hand into the middle. And remember, many of those recipes didn't give a temperature; the directions read, "...bake in hot oven," or, "...bake in cool oven." A hot oven, 400F, is going to feel way different than a cool one, 250F.

I was really fortunate. My mother converted all of Grandma's recipes into proportions.... for each cup of flour to make biscuits, I need to add so much of this and so much of that. Just as easy to make biscuits for 20 people as for 2 by following her formula. Speaking of proportions, most families didn't have standardized measuring utensils, and that was okay. It didn't matter if your cup was a dainty teacup or a larger coffee cup. As long as you consistently used the same unit of measure, the ingredients would remain in proportion to one another.

To be sure, there are recipes where a more exact measurement is needed. The size of an egg, and hence, the volume of 'white' can vary dramatically and affect the height one can achieve in a souffle or angel food cake. For the most part, though, those weren't the recipes our grandmothers and great-grandmothers were making. Their recipes were more forgiving and allowed for that margin of error.

Really enjoying reading this thread.
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Old 01-27-2010, 12:57 PM
 
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I have been trying to find my grandmothers recipe made with jello and ice cream.It was her signatrure dessert and we all remember her bringing it to every function,Christmas to 4th of July. If you come across anything like that, please post or let me know. She has been gone a long time,but I know my mom and sister would get such a kick if I ever surprised them and made this,,thanks.
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Old 01-27-2010, 01:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nanannie View Post
I have been trying to find my grandmothers recipe made with jello and ice cream.It was her signatrure dessert and we all remember her bringing it to every function,Christmas to 4th of July. If you come across anything like that, please post or let me know. She has been gone a long time,but I know my mom and sister would get such a kick if I ever surprised them and made this,,thanks.
This is a new one on me. Tell us more about this dessert, please. Was it more elaborate than using ice cream in lieu of cold water to cool the jello? I have a couple of recipes where I substitute sherbet for cold water. Do you remember what the flavors were? Did she use different flavor combinations for different holidays?
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Old 01-27-2010, 02:12 PM
 
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It was always pink. She had fresh berries on it in summer. Nothing fancy.She called it "grand daughters grand dessert", and maybe thats why I loved it. No one made a fuss over it like I did.
I remember seeing vanilla ice cream,melted. It was served very cold, but not frozen,kind of a cross between jello and pudding,,but light. She served it in little bowls.Thats all I remember. I was so young. All I knew was it tasted like grandma to me.
She said it was her "secret recipe" and always said she would share it 'one day'. But, as the story goes over and over, she up and left us unexpectedly. Mom wondered if she didnt share it cuz it was so simple, she wanted people to think there was more fuss to it. I wonder if I would still think it was so delicious today.
I would appreciate anyone sharing if you come across something like it, and thank you.
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Old 01-27-2010, 02:41 PM
 
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I've seen pies made from jello and strawberry yogurt---a quick Google search, and I found some recipes with ice cream used instead of yogurt. I bet that was it! Do you remember if it had a crust, like maybe a graham cracker crust?

Here's one of the recipes I found. But there are all sorts of variations to be found. I know when my son's preschool served the yogurt/jello pie, it didn't have strawberries, so I guess these pies can be made without fresh strawberries, with just the ice cream and jello. And instead of pouring it into a crust, since it was made from jello I'm sure it would set if you poured it into bowls instead.

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM PIE 1 (3 oz.) pkg. strawberry Jello
1 1/4 c. boiling water
1 pt. vanilla ice cream
12 oz. strawberries, thawed & drained (can use some of juice instead of all water)
Graham cracker crust or baked pie shell

Dissolve Jello in boiling water. Add ice cream by spoonfuls. Set until partially firm. Add thawed and drained strawberries. Can use some juice instead of all water. Put in graham cracker crust or baked pie shell. Do not use ice milk! Makes a 10" pie.

Last edited by andthentherewere3; 01-27-2010 at 02:52 PM..
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Old 01-27-2010, 04:08 PM
 
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Doesn't that seem like quite a bit of liquid? 1 1/4 C water plus 2 C ice cream, that's over 3 cups. A 3 oz. pkg only takes 2 cups total of liquid to set. Unless the formula for jello has changed, that seems like it wouldn't set properly.
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Old 01-27-2010, 06:15 PM
 
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Mason's Daughter, my grandmother made an applesauce cake but it seems like she used plain cake layers. I'll have to think. I bet your grandmother's is delicious with the biscuits.

MI Coastie Mom, thanks for the information about wood stoves. Also, I love what you included about measuring and kitchen tools for different families. Glad you're enjoying the thread -- I am too!

Nanannie, this sounds delicious! I'm going to dig and ask around some. Maybe between all of us we can come up with something.

Andthentherewere 3: thanks for the recipe. Anything with Jello is good.
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