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Old 01-28-2010, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
1,237 posts, read 2,717,723 times
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First of all, I have to apoligize for the spelling in my last post. As for the stacked apple cake, prepare regular biscuit dough, roll, not too thick, into 8" rounds and bake in 350 oven -Mom always baked it in several 8" skillets- untill done. Don't put them under the broiler as you don't want them too brown, but you do want them done. Place first round on plate, spread applesauce on layer, place 2nd round on top, spread more applesauce, and continue until you have used all biscuit rounds. We always made 4 or 5 layers and the bread rounds are stable enough to hold up. You can add sweetening to the applesauce to taste if you want. After the cake sets awhile the applesauce soaks into the bread and it is so much better.
Antiquesmountainapache, I have used applesauce as an icing for applesauce-spice cake, but only made 2 layers.

Last edited by masonsdaughter; 01-28-2010 at 06:00 AM..
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Old 01-28-2010, 06:30 AM
 
4,723 posts, read 13,894,301 times
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Thank you so much for the quick service
This could be very close if its not the exact one. I will try it and see.
I couldnt give you any more reps Andthenthere and MICoastie, but you have my appreciation
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Old 01-28-2010, 06:50 PM
 
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Nanannie, did you find something similar to your grandmother's dish?
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Old 01-29-2010, 05:48 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nanannie View Post
Thank you so much for the quick service
This could be very close if its not the exact one. I will try it and see.
I couldnt give you any more reps Andthenthere and MICoastie, but you have my appreciation
You are very welcome! I was going to try out the recipe myself yesterday, but with an unexpected snowstorm I was shoveling snow and didn't have the time. I am definitely going to try it out within the next few days.
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Old 01-30-2010, 02:30 PM
 
2,605 posts, read 4,041,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andthentherewere3 View Post
This discussion prompted me to look up old cookstoves. Those poor housewives, how they ever managed to bake anything well is beyond me, it was hard work. Look at the description I found for using those old ovens:
I have friends who have grown up cooking on a woodburning cook stove. They bake cakes and cookies in it's oven all the time. I'm amazed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustJulia View Post
My grandmother's mother was a good cook, from what I'm told, but she didn't have many written recipes. Gram tried to write some of her mother's well-loved dishes down to pass down to children and grandchildren, but this was harder to do than she imagined. I'm told the conversation about bread pudding went something like this:

Gram: How many eggs does the recipe need?
Great-Gram: That depends on how much bread you're using.
Gram: Okay, how much bread does it need?
Great-Gram: Oh, that depends on how many people you're feeding.
Gram: How about eight people? How much bread would I need?
Great-Gram: Just enough to feed everybody.

And so on.
That sounds like my grandmother. She used to throw things into a bowl, stir and bake and voila!! Magic. She never measured anything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post

Fairy Pudding
1 glass jelly
1/2 cup hot water
1 1/2 tablespoons minute tapioca

Dissolve currant, grape or quince jelly with the hot water; add tapioca. Cook over hot water until tapioca is transparent. Sweeten to taste with a little sugar. Serve very cold with sweetened whipped cream.
I'm trying this one ASAP, it sounds GOOD.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81
There's a recipe in here for calf's foot jelly, but I don't want to gross anyone out too badly. And most of the recipes in the "Preservation of Food" chapter are open-kettle and end with "fill jars and seal."
Otherwise known as canning. My sister cans a ton. She has 4 kids and a huge garden every summer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81
Toast Water
2 slices stale bread, toasted
1 cup boiling water
1/2 teaspoon salt

toast the bread until golden brown and dry all the way through, or dry it in a moderately hot oven till golden brown and crisp. [ou the boiling water over it and add the salt; cover and set aside until cool. Strain, and serve hot or cold. Some add millk, cream and sugar, and serve hot in place of tea or coffee.

Makes you hungry, doesn't it?
My mother used to make milk toast when I was growing up. She toasted bread until crisp, heated milk and poured the hot milk over the buttered toast. Ahh, comfort food.
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Old 01-30-2010, 02:36 PM
 
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I am very impressed with your friends! The milk toast sounds good (I love toast).
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Old 01-31-2010, 12:58 AM
 
Location: Richardson, TX
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Isn't milk toast a bowl of milk with the actual toast in it though? The recipe above from Ohiogirl has you soak the milk in the hot liquid, and then strain it. I think it's just toast-flavored water, which sounds very odd to me.
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Old 01-31-2010, 07:15 AM
 
2,790 posts, read 5,690,679 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
Isn't milk toast a bowl of milk with the actual toast in it though? The recipe above from Ohiogirl has you soak the milk in the hot liquid, and then strain it. I think it's just toast-flavored water, which sounds very odd to me.
Debsi, I grew up on milk toast. My dad grew up on a farm, being the oldest, he was expected to do the milking. His mother, however, had other plans for him, saw his potential in electronics and/or engineering, and encouraged him to work on more advanced math classes. He often stayed after school to get tutoring from his math teachers. This meant that by the time he got home, those cows were demanding to be milked.

He told me that the milk would sometimes have a faint vinegar smell when he would first milking. As a result, the thought of a glass of milk or milk on cold or cooked cereal would turn his stomach. And he did not like pickles, catsup, mustard, anything with vinegar in it.

He could like in things, custard, pudding, ice cream; the one exception was milk toast, and he was a fanatic about it.

I have never had the toast water as suggested in the recipe, but I have heard about it. It is my understanding that it was a sickroom recipe, in that it was fed to the gravely ill who could not tolerate much in thier stomach.
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Old 01-31-2010, 10:40 AM
 
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As I mentioned earlier, I was given all sorts of cookbooks from my IL's dating from 1908 right up to the 60's. I didn't keep the later books, but kept all the earlier ones, which included a lot of handwritten recipes. There are several recipes for milk and water toast in my 1931 Boston Cooking School Cookbook. (I believe my Grandmother IL spent her girlhood in Boston--this was given to her in 1931 when she was getting married) I can't say the water or milk toast sounds appetizing, but there are so many variations in the Boston cookbook that it must have been popular. There was also Brown Bread Milk Toast, Cream Toast, Tomato Cream Toast, Cinnamon Toast, Orange Toast, and German Toast. All involved soaking bread.

Water Toast
Dip slices of dry toast quickly in boiling salted water, allowing 1/2 teasoon salt to 1 cup boiling water. Spread slices with butter and serve at once.

Milk Toast I
1 pint scalded milk
2 tablespoons butter
2 1/2 tablespoons bread flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons cold water
6 slices dry toast
Add cold water gradually to flour to make a smooth, thin paste. Add part of milk, stirring constantly until thickened. When smooth, add rest of milk, cover, and cook 20 minutes; then add salt and butter in small pieces. Dip slices of toast separately in sauce; when soft, remove to serving dish. Pour remaining sauce over all.

German Toast
3 eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons sugar
1 cup milk
Beat eggs slightly, add salt, sugar, and milk; strain into a shallow dish. Soak bread in mixture until soft. Cook on hot, well-greased griddle or frying pan; brown on one side, turn and brown other side. Serve for breakfast or luncheon, or with a sauce for dessert.
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Old 01-31-2010, 11:14 AM
 
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Here are some interesting handwritten recipes tucked into the 1908 Rumford Complete Cookbook:

Magic Cake
(already frosted)
1/4 cup fat
1/2 cup sugar
4 egg yolks, beaten
1/4 cup milk
1 teaspoon lemon extract
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 cup flour
Cream fat and sugar. Add rest of ingredients and beat 2 minutes. Pour into shallow pan lined with wax paper. Cover with meringue.

Meringue
4 egg whites
1-3 cups sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 cup shredded almonds
Beat whites and add sugar. Beat until creamy. Add rest of ingredients and roughly spread over cake. Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons sugar mixed with 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon. Bake 35 minutes in moderately slow oven. Allow to cool 10 minutes and using sharp knife cut down through paper, remove cake slices and tear off paper.

Baking Fish (not sure what type of pork was used?? maybe bacon?? pork rind?? what was common back then?)
After fish has been washed put brown paper in pan. Cut 6 (inch) square pieces of pork into pan, lay fish on pork, some pork on top. Sprinkle with salt, pepper & flour. Cut small onion onto fish. Put little water in before putting in oven. Bake 1/2 hour or more. After it is baked add butter & cream.

Porcupines
1 cup dates
1 cup walnuts, cut fine
1 cup sugar
1 egg
1 tablespoon butter, pinch of salt, vanilla. Mix together sugar & butter first then egg, salt, vanilla, dates & walnuts. Drop by spoonfuls into coconut, press into ball, cook in hot oven, until brown, watch closely, they burn easily.
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