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Old 01-20-2010, 01:51 AM
 
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Here are some more recipes from my grandmother's cookbook.

This one comes from a section called "A Few Dishes for the Invalid". I have used it many times and it does taste good!

Scraped Steak Balls

Have a thick piece of round steak. With a heavy spoon scrape the meat, using just what comes off in the spoon. Make tiny pats, enough for one mouthful only, brown until done as desired, turing from side to side. Have ready a piece of toast. On this, put the meat balls and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Into the fry pan pour one tablespoon of water or just enough to get the meat juice which browned in the pan. Pour this juice, or gravy, over the balls and toast. Serve very hot. A little butter may be put on each ball if desired. Invalids and babies can take this if they can have any solid food at all.

Sometimes I fix this at Easter and put it on a bunny butter dish. (Yes, I am a prissy gal!). The dish has a spreader for the butter that also makes the bunny's tail.

Sweet Butter

1 pound creamery butter (I use a pound of salted butter from the grocery store).
1 pint whole milk

Place butter in bowl and let soften to room temperature. Leave milk at room temperature until just cool. With a wire mixer or slitted spoon cream butter until soft and easy to stir. Add milk a little at a time, like making mayonnaise, blending milk and butter until all the milk is added and no milk is noticeable. Make in cottage prints. This will give 2 pounds of butter that will taste like fresh dairy butter. No more salt is added. Delicious.

I am assuming that cottage prints is some type of decoration from a butter mold. I just make it round so that it fits my dish.

Cheese Custard (I think I'll try this soon).

Cut sufficient layers of bread needed, spread with butter, sprinkle with cheese, salt and pepper; make two layers in baking dish, cover with 2 cups milk and 2 eggs beaten together. Bake half hour. Serve from dish in which it was baked. Pepper and mustard may be added.

I won't type everything for the Macaroni and Cheese, but some of it is just too cute.

"Break and boil macaroni in salt water until tender (about 20 minutes)." This is not a typo on my part -- that's what is in the cookbook. "This dish, when left over, makes nice croquettes. Serve with tomato sauce."

There is an entire section on croquettes. Along with chicken, ham and salmon are some unusual ones -- macaroni croquettes, cottage cheese croquettes and several recipes for rice croquettes.

Finally, I noticed these words on some of the colored pictures. "Courtesy Birds Eye Frosted Foods".

I'll pick out some more things and post in a day or two.
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Old 01-20-2010, 06:58 AM
 
Location: The Hall of Justice
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antiquesmountainapache View Post
Cut sufficient layers of bread needed
My grandmother's mother was a good cook, from what I'm told, but she didn't have many written recipes. Gram tried to write some of her mother's well-loved dishes down to pass down to children and grandchildren, but this was harder to do than she imagined. I'm told the conversation about bread pudding went something like this:

Gram: How many eggs does the recipe need?
Great-Gram: That depends on how much bread you're using.
Gram: Okay, how much bread does it need?
Great-Gram: Oh, that depends on how many people you're feeding.
Gram: How about eight people? How much bread would I need?
Great-Gram: Just enough to feed everybody.

And so on.

By the way, thank you for reminding me to look up what a croquette is. I've heard the word and seen recipes (never made them, though), but it never clicked what a croquette is. For those of you who also didn't know, it's a little cake made from minced, cooked meat and then fried. Like a crab cake.
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Old 01-20-2010, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
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My mother used to make Cheese Strata that sounds like the cheese custard recipe. I loved it when I was a kid.
I have my grandmother's hand written notebook of recipes. I'll see if there's anything amusing in there.
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Old 01-20-2010, 07:30 AM
 
Location: DC
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In an old cookbook from the '30s I saw a recipe for "City Chicken" where the "chicken" was actually veal. Apparently it was a cheaper chicken alternative at the time?
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Old 01-20-2010, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
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JustJulia,I tried to write the family recipes down, with the same results. I think a lot of them were developed when fireplace cooking was still the main way to cook, as the recipe for baked items never mentioned the temp. Mom told me just to set the oven to 350 and see what happened and to adjust the temp later if needed.We make salmon croquettes in my family, but call 'em salmon patties. 1 can salmon, 1 egg, and enough flour to hold them together. Fry.
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Old 01-20-2010, 09:18 PM
 
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Hello to everyone. Just Julia, that is the way my mother and grandmother cooked. Now, I make old favorites without the recipes and improvise but I am pretty big on recipes. This drove my mother crazy when I was learning to cook. The directions sound just like the ones you mentioned!

My grandmother and aunt used the cookbook a lot for the cake recipes. They both loved to bake. I like to make cakes when I am in the mood, but what I really like to bake are cookies. I'll post some of the information about the croquettes.

Juniperbleu, love that about the "city chicken". I've never heard that!

Gentlearts, I can't wait to hear what's in your grandmother's cookbook. I have one like it that was my mother's. Most of these are from the late 30s and early 40s.

Masonsdaugter, love that about the fireplace cooking! In the parts of the south where I've lived, the words "croquettes" and "patties" are sometimes interchanged. This would be in Atlanta, northwest Georgia and southeast Tennessee. Do you flatten the patties out? Do you use Double Q Salmon?
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Old 01-21-2010, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
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Antiquesmountainapache, At the moment, I'm using Kroger brand salmon. You can also use mackeral for this, but it has a stronger taste. We make the mixture thin enough so that it sort of flattens out on it's own when dropped into the hot pan. Sometimes we add a bit of the juices from the can to make it thin enough.
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Old 01-21-2010, 08:19 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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I have a "homemaker's best friend" dated 1925 that alternately sends me into peals of laughter and scares the bejeezus out of me. I'll find some of the more amusing recipes and post them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by juniperbleu View Post
In an old cookbook from the '30s I saw a recipe for "City Chicken" where the "chicken" was actually veal. Apparently it was a cheaper chicken alternative at the time?
Mom made city chicken a lot when we were kids. Ours were cheap cuts of cubed pork -- maybe there was veal in it, but I'm not sure; the remembered texture is more like pork than veal -- on a wooden skewer, salted and peppered liberally, and broiled.

City chicken - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Last edited by Ohiogirl81; 01-21-2010 at 08:22 AM.. Reason: punctuation clean-up
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Old 01-21-2010, 10:46 PM
 
3,647 posts, read 4,756,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
I have a "homemaker's best friend" dated 1925 that alternately sends me into peals of laughter and scares the bejeezus out of me. I'll find some of the more amusing recipes and post them.

Mom made city chicken a lot when we were kids. Ours were cheap cuts of cubed pork -- maybe there was veal in it, but I'm not sure; the remembered texture is more like pork than veal -- on a wooden skewer, salted and peppered liberally, and broiled.

City chicken - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Oh good, I can't wait to read your post! I remember that my mother used to buy veal cutlets that were already breaded. Wonder if they still have those? I think I'll look the next time I buy a large amount of groceries.
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Old 01-22-2010, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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The actual title of the book is "Home Makers' Cooking School Cook Book," copyright 1925 by Jessie M. DeBoth, A.B., Director, Home Makers' Schools of Chicago, Ill. The title page goes on to say that Ms. DeBoth was "formerly the home economics specialist and Girls' Club leader in charge of Upper Michigan under joint supervision of Michigan Agricultural College and Unitd States government co-operating."

Here's a good one, in the "Puddings" chapter:

Fairy Pudding
1 glass jelly
1/2 cup hot water
1 1/2 tablespoons minute tapioca

Dissolve currant, grape or quince jelly with the hot water; add tapioca. Cook over hot water until tapioca is transparent. Sweeten to taste with a little sugar. Serve very cold with sweetened whipped cream.

There's a recipe in here for calf's foot jelly, but I don't want to gross anyone out too badly. And most of the recipes in the "Preservation of Food" chapter are open-kettle and end with "fill jars and seal."

Mock Crab
4 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspons mustard
1 1/2 cups milk
1 can corn
1 egg
3 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 cup cracker crumbs

Melt butter, add flour mixed with dry seasonings and pour on gradually the milk. Add corn, eggs slightly beaten, and Worcestershire sauce. Pour into a buttered baking dish, cover with crumbs, and bake until top is brown.

Cheese Salad
1/2 tablespoon gelatine
1/4 lb. American cheese
1/2 pint cream
1 tablespoon walnuts, salt and paprika

Dissolve one-half tablespoon of gelatine in two tablespoons of boiling water. When cold beat into one-half pint of child cream that has been beaten solid, and to which has been added one-fourth pound of grated American cheese, one tablespoon of chopped walnuts, salt and paprika to taste. Pour into a square mould and when firm cut in slices and serve on lettuce leaves dressed with French dressing.

The "Invalid Cookery" chapter has yummy stuff like Albumenized Milk, Beef Juice, Irish Moss, Scraped Beef Sandwiches, and ...

Toast Water
2 slices stale bread, toasted
1 cup boiling water
1/2 teaspoon salt

toast the bread until golden brown and dry all the way through, or dry it in a moderately hot oven till golden brown and crisp. [ou the boiling water over it and add the salt; cover and set aside until cool. Strain, and serve hot or cold. Some add millk, cream and sugar, and serve hot in place of tea or coffee.

Makes you hungry, doesn't it?
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