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Old 01-25-2010, 06:26 PM
 
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Thanks to online translators, I finally corrected the misspelling I made at age 12 of the recipe title.

It is pronounced "OO-neh PAN-oo KAHK-oo".

Many of you are familiar with the Dutch Baby, which is another type of oven pancake. This recipe produces a much softer, denser, eggier pancake, which is almost like a custard.

The amounts were directly converted from my childhood friend's mother's Finnish cookbook in which all amounts were metric.


2 eggs
1 2/3 C milk (whole is best)
1 t salt (I often cut by half if using salted butter in the pans)
2 T sugar
2/3 C + 2T flour (2 deciliters)**

Preheat oven to 425.

1. Whisk flour into milk and set aside (on counter) for 30 minutes.

2. Place salt, sugar, and eggs into blender; add flour/milk mixture. Mix on blend/high for 1 minute.

3. While blending, place 2 T butter in each of two pie pans (I use glass/Pyrex) and place in preheated oven until melted. DO NOT BROWN THE BUTTER.

4. Slide out the oven rack and pour the mixture into each pan. Bake 15 - 25 minutes, until the edges are golden brown and puffy and the pancake has risen in the center. (I also jiggle the pan to see if the center has set)

5. Cut into wedges, if desired, and serve immediately.

We typically eat them with either fresh lemon and powdered sugar, or a good quality preserve. My friend's mother made the BEST raspberry freezer jam, and it was perfect with these (does anyone have a recipe? hint hint )



**If doubling the recipe for 4 pancakes, the recipe is as follows:

4 eggs
3 1/3 C milk
2 t salt
4 T sugar
1 1/2 C + 1 T flour
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Old 01-25-2010, 09:43 PM
 
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These sound so good and thank you for the recipe! I can't find my glass pie pans, so this gives me an excuse to buy some new ones. This will next week's pancake offering. I do breakfast for dinner once a week in the winter and am looking forward to these!
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Old 01-25-2010, 11:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antiquesmountainapache View Post
These sound so good and thank you for the recipe! I can't find my glass pie pans, so this gives me an excuse to buy some new ones. This will next week's pancake offering. I do breakfast for dinner once a week in the winter and am looking forward to these!
You're welcome!

My hubby loooooves them, and they really are easy to make.

A few tips:

--don't worry about whisking out all the lumps of flour...the blender will take care of them later (remember to let the milk/flour sit on the counter for at least 30 min)

--if using glass pans, NEVER put batter in them that has just come out of the refrigerator...the pans may shatter (happened to me once, and nearly stopped my heart). Rest the batter on the countertop at least 30 minutes.

--if you make the batter the day before, or make a double batch and have some left over, rest the batter 30 min, then zap it in the blender for a minute to aerate it.
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Old 01-26-2010, 08:21 AM
 
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I have always heard these referred to simply as pannukakku. If my sources are correct, the prefix/word "unni" refers to baking in an oven, such as unni riispuuro (baked rice pudding) or unnijuusto (baked cheese). I first had pannukakku at a Finnish restaurant in Michigan's Copper County. This is the recipe I was told they use:

Pannukakku

Butter and line two 8” cake pans with wax paper. Pre-heat oven to 425. In the bowl of electric mixer, beat until light and fluffy:
2 eggs
Add, beating continuously:
1 C milk
C flour
2 T sugar
t salt
The mixture should have the consistency of thick cream. Pour into prepared pans; batter should be about 1/3” deep. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Turn onto serving dish and peel off waxed paper. Serve hot. If can be made ahead and re-heated, but is best served immediately after baking. Served with jam for breakfast or with blueberry soup for dessert. Can also be used with fresh berries in season as you would a shortcake.
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Old 01-26-2010, 08:51 AM
 
5,906 posts, read 5,177,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MICoastieMom View Post
I have always heard these referred to simply as pannukakku. If my sources are correct, the prefix/word "unni" refers to baking in an oven, such as unni riispuuro (baked rice pudding) or unnijuusto (baked cheese). I first had pannukakku at a Finnish restaurant in Michigan's Copper County. This is the recipe I was told they use:

Pannukakku

Butter and line two 8 cake pans with wax paper. Pre-heat oven to 425. In the bowl of electric mixer, beat until light and fluffy:
2 eggs
Add, beating continuously:
1 C milk
C flour
2 T sugar
t salt
The mixture should have the consistency of thick cream. Pour into prepared pans; batter should be about 1/3 deep. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Turn onto serving dish and peel off waxed paper. Serve hot. If can be made ahead and re-heated, but is best served immediately after baking. Served with jam for breakfast or with blueberry soup for dessert. Can also be used with fresh berries in season as you would a shortcake.
Wax paper?
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Old 01-26-2010, 10:27 AM
 
2,790 posts, read 5,691,495 times
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Rayne, you made me smile; I am guessing you are not very old. Keeps it from sticking to the pan, works the same way as parchment paper, and until recently was more readily available. You didn't hear much about parchment paper until the advent of the Food Network and Martha Stewart. When I was a kid, before cooking sprays were developed, cake pans were routinely greased and floured and usually lined with wax paper.
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Old 01-26-2010, 11:13 AM
 
5,906 posts, read 5,177,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MICoastieMom View Post
Rayne, you made me smile; I am guessing you are not very old. Keeps it from sticking to the pan, works the same way as parchment paper, and until recently was more readily available. You didn't hear much about parchment paper until the advent of the Food Network and Martha Stewart. When I was a kid, before cooking sprays were developed, cake pans were routinely greased and floured and usually lined with wax paper.
Oh please, I'm 45.

My recipe rarely, if ever, sticks to the pan (glass pie pan), and I'm just used to having the batter cook in the hot butter.

Btw, it is also known as Kropsu. (thank you Google!)
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