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Old 02-28-2010, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Pawnee Nation
7,525 posts, read 14,871,784 times
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With spring come our traditional Wild Onions and Eggs

Gathering wild onions in spring is a ritual among the Oklahoma Cherokee. Begin with a cup of wild onions that have been cut into small pieces. Two or three tablespoons of bacon dripping are put in a skillet and warmed over medium heat. Place the chopped onions and about one fourth cup of water. Simmer while stirring until the onions are tender. You can add small amounts of water if needed, When the onions are tender, and most of the water has cooked away, add six or seven beaten eggs and scramble.



Grape Dumplings
1 cup flour
1 tsp baking powder
2 tsp sugar
tsp salt
1 tbsp shortening
cup grape juice

Mix flour, baking powder, sugar, salt and shortening. Add juice and mix into stiff dough. Roll dough very thin on floured board and cut into strips " wide (or roll dough in hands and break off pea-sized bits). Drop into boiling grape juice and cook for 10 - 12 minutes.

Some Cherokee continue to make their grape dumplings by gathering and cooking wild grapes, or 'possum grapes' instead of grape juice.


Kanuchi
For those interested, Kanuchi is the hickory nut, cracked, shelled and pounded until they are of a consistency that can be formed into a ball that will hold its shape. Kanuchi balls are usually about three inches in diameter and must be stored in a cold place. Today kanuchi is usually kept in a freezer.

To use, place a kanuchi ball in a saucepan with about a quart of water and bring it to a boil to dissolve the ball. Allow the kanuchi to simmer about ten minutes and then poor it through a fine sieve. (A colander lined with cheese cloth works very well for this.) All the remaining shells are left in the sieve. It should be about as thick as light cream. Most traditional cooks will add about two cups of homemade hominy to a quart of kanuchi. Some cooks prefer hominy grits, which are prepared according to package directions and added to the kanuchi. Others add cooked rice. Such things as consistency and how much hominy or hominy grits to add are, of course a matter of taste, as is the addition of salt or sugar. Serve hot as soup.
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Old 02-28-2010, 09:07 PM
 
3,647 posts, read 4,745,245 times
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Thanks for posting this Goodpasture. It is all very interesting.
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Old 02-28-2010, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Phoenix,Arizona
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antiquesmountainapache View Post
Thanks for posting this Goodpasture. It is all very interesting.
I'd Agree But I'll have to use the onions from Safeway
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Old 03-01-2010, 12:55 PM
 
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are wild onions similar to mexican green onions or even shallots? Or are they more like ramps or spring garlic?
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Old 03-05-2010, 06:41 AM
 
Location: Pawnee Nation
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they are a type of ramps.......rather ramps are a type of green onions.
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Old 03-05-2010, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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Default Grape Dumplings

In what way are they served, warm, cool, alone, with something?
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Old 03-05-2010, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
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Goodpasture, the grape dumplings with o'possum grapes sound good. Mom still makes wild grape jelly and it sure is good. Do you know how to make flour from acorns? I have heard my Grandfather talk about his Grandmother doing this, but I didn't think to ask him how she did it.
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