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Old 03-30-2010, 04:20 PM
 
Location: LI/VA/IL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 60'sGal View Post
I've always thought slow is the way, but I see the top Chefs on The Food Network now all say hot and fast.

I wonder????
Slow cooking is good for less tender cuts of beef. Beef tenderloin is very tender and lends itself very well for a higher temp and less time.

This has just been from my experience-I don't cook beef tenderloin very often but when I have it's always been at a high temp.
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Old 03-30-2010, 08:15 PM
 
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I did the hot and fast that is recommended but we actually prefer low and slow. I think it comes down to a personal preference. We don't like rare meat and are more of the medium well crowd. I think the rarer you like it the better the hot and fast method will suit you.
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Old 03-30-2010, 10:16 PM
 
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I start at 425 for 10 min and turn down to 350. The reason is that if you quickly seal the outside, the juices stay in (grandma taught me that). I cook to 145 and it is pink in the middle. Time depends on how big. I generally buy the entire thing, cut out about 6 nice filets from the center and cook the roasts separately - I make 2 small roasts and 4-6 filets.
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Old 04-02-2010, 07:44 AM
 
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How top chefs and restaurants do it...Remove from packaging, evenly sprinkle roughly 2 teaspoons of kosher salt and loosely cover with plastic wrap or foil. Leave it out for an hour before cooking. Next step is to sear it before cooking. Contrary to popular believe, searing or browning is for flavor and does not "seal" in the juices. A way to sear if you don't have any large equipment is to put two burners on high and put a cookie/baking sheet on top on them. Rub on any oil other than olive (turns nasty at high heat) onto it. Wipe the whole thing with paper towels to get the surface as dry as possible. Even if it's not consistently seared, it will be fine. After searing put it into the oven. Goal is not have it sitting in it's own juices. If you're within 300f-450f, there isn't really a difference, 200f vs 500f would be two different end products on the other-hand. Bake to desired done-ness via meat thermometer, if you have convection turn it on. Let it rest for 10-15mins prior to slicing.
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Old 04-02-2010, 10:14 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
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I'd say hot and fast, but I like it rare and by rare I mean rare, not medium rare. Anything over medium rare/medium just ruins this expensive cut of meat, imho. Cuts with more marbling are better for the medium well crowd, like ribeye.

Crust it with fresh herbs, kosher salt, cracked back pepper in an olive oil rub mixture.
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:42 PM
 
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Are there differences in taste between Angus tenderloin versus Choice versus Prime? I think at whole foods you can even get grass-fed tenderloin for a premium price. With this kind of very tender meat does it make that much of a difference?
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Old 04-03-2010, 07:11 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smokingGun View Post
Are there differences in taste between Angus tenderloin versus Choice versus Prime? I think at whole foods you can even get grass-fed tenderloin for a premium price. With this kind of very tender meat does it make that much of a difference?
IMO, get it as cheap as possible from Costco/Sams/BJs...Tenderloin is the most tender steak and will great as is. If cooked right, everyone will be impressed by a "cheaper" tenderloin. If you feel compelled to spend more, go all out
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Old 04-03-2010, 07:21 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smokingGun View Post
Are there differences in taste between Angus tenderloin versus Choice versus Prime? I think at whole foods you can even get grass-fed tenderloin for a premium price. With this kind of very tender meat does it make that much of a difference?
Angus is just a breed of cow, it's usually Choice too, I think. Prime is hard to find, but is the best imo. I can tell a difference between Prime and Choice. Usually the restaurants snatch up most of the Prime meat tho, I think only 2% of beef is Prime (or a number close to that.).
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Old 04-03-2010, 12:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sophialee View Post
I can tell a difference between Prime and Choice.
Some or the majority of the time, I agree. Prime has the most fat and generally results in more flavor and being more tender. On the other hand, if one was given ten samples of choice and ten samples of prime each cooked using different methods, in a blind taste test would the person be able to identify all samples correctly? Possibly, but more than likely they'd miss some. Another example is if one goes to a restaurant, orders a choice steak, gets accidentally served a prime steak, would they be able to identify it's not choice? Professional competitions where tens of thousands of dollars are on the line do not all use prime or even Kobe.

In the interest of thoroughness...Other factors addressing steaks are dry age, wet aged and whether or not it's been injected with a solution...
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Old 04-03-2010, 12:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 60'sGal View Post
I've always thought slow is the way, but I see the top Chefs on The Food Network now all say hot and fast.

I wonder????
It helps seal in the natural juices and flavors. I think it helps if you like your meat more red in the center than might be achieved slowly in the oven. I've not done one this way but I know people who do.
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