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Old 10-02-2010, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Tucson
42,851 posts, read 51,320,492 times
Reputation: 22716
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melissa78703 View Post
I did some contract work for a business that did not permit personal cell phones in the office, not even in purses. They had to be left at home or in your car. Computers were networked, but only two had Internet access, and these were overseen by supervisors who were in the room at all times to make sure that the Internet was used for work purposes only -- research and the like. That office had apparently had some serious "issues" in the past.
Good luck to this office because it will need it! If somebody imposes such stringent and ridiculous rules to me, I'll count the speckles on the ceiling for hours if need be, but still won't be working! Just out of spite!
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Old 10-02-2010, 08:07 PM
 
85 posts, read 14,108 times
Reputation: 117
What's up with the younger generation is that there are some people out there who just don't feel comfortable interacting with others unless they can lump them all into neat little categories or paint them with broad-brush strokes. So those folks keep telling themselves that younger workers aren't their professional peers, or that they're entitled and arrogant, or that they ALL had helicopter parents who do their work for them, or that there is a vast chasm between one's late 20s and one's early 30s in terms of maturity and discipline, and they feel better knowing they can judge an entire group of people by a few sensational news stories or a few bad co-workers.

By the way, I am not yet 30 but earned a high-level position through hard work, long hours, and years of lower-level jobs that paid bad wages. And I'm also not content to rest on my laurels - not because I want a bushel of promotions and prizes - but because I am disappointed in myself if deliver anything less than top-quality service to my clients.

I don't have a facebook account. I actually don't do social networking at all. And I was a latchkey kid who did the grocery shopping and the meal planning for my family, too.
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Old 10-02-2010, 08:21 PM
 
8,681 posts, read 6,968,169 times
Reputation: 14877
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. Burberry View Post
What's up with the younger generation is that there are some people out there who just don't feel comfortable interacting with others unless they can lump them all into neat little categories or paint them with broad-brush strokes. So those folks keep telling themselves that younger workers aren't their professional peers, or that they're entitled and arrogant, or that they ALL had helicopter parents who do their work for them, or that there is a vast chasm between one's late 20s and one's early 30s in terms of maturity and discipline, and they feel better knowing they can judge an entire group of people by a few sensational news stories or a few bad co-workers.
Here ya go, kid. Emphasis added so that you and they other hypersensitive Gen Yers here understand that I was not generalizing or that I fit into your description of "some people." You know, because it needs to be spelled out as the analytical thinking and ability to infer just aren't there. But hey, thanks for proving my point!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Avienne View Post
Don't get me wrong: It's perfectly normal for a 20-something of any generation to be inexperienced and need mentoring. I'm only too happy to work with a 20-something who shows initiative and wants to learn so they can do it themselves. Unfortunately, too many of them think "teamwork" and "asking for help" means asking someone else to do it for them.

I have also met quite a few Gen Yers who cannot see the "big picture" or excel at analytical thinking or process management. They need everything spelled out for them in a way Gen Xers, and even Baby Boomers, didn't at that age. They approach work like they approach the Internet: Ask a question, expect to receive a pre-packaged solution. The problem is that the workplace is not a human Google farm, and 99 times out of 100, it's best to at least try to figure it out on your own, and then verify and get approval for what you've come up with.
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Old 10-02-2010, 08:28 PM
 
Location: So Cal
23,209 posts, read 16,789,173 times
Reputation: 21842
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avienne View Post
Here ya go, kid. Emphasis added so that you understand that I was not generalizing or that I fit into your description of "some people." You know, because it needs to be spelled out as the analytical thinking and ability to infer just aren't there. But hey, thanks for proving my point!

"You must spread some reputation around before giving it to Avienne."


LOL, that almost sounded pervy didn't it.
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Old 10-02-2010, 08:37 PM
 
Location: J-ville, FL
215 posts, read 194,846 times
Reputation: 303
Quote:
Originally Posted by miyu View Post
Is it my imagination, or is the attitude of the younger generation off-putting (ages 18-28 or so)? Obviously not all young people are the same, but it seems like more people feel entited to acting extremely moody (even at work), ignoring coworkers just because they feel sick of them without attempting the customary greetings, wasting everyone's time talking about their own dramas, spending all their time on social networking, disrespecting elders (and looking disgusted anytime anyone attempts an "uncool" joke)...

Really, I'm not that old but I am already losing touch with the young-uns. I also went through a moody phase in my rebellious youth but never incorporated that with a sense of entitlement. The rebellion was within, and I simply never took it out on others. I was definitely never rude to my elders... and especially not at work. I'm just used to saying hi to all the people at work, even all the janitors. To me this is common courtesy as a human being.

With some young people all I hear are complaints about how they are perpetually bored ... and how everyone else is boring. They seem to think that they have developed more insight by introspection and drama alone than anyone via real life-altering experiences. They have no patience for anything that doesn't benefit or interest themselves.

I really don't get this new attitude I'm observing. Is it the emotard liberation where you should feel free to express all of your emotional diarrhea in public, even at the expense of common courtesy? I guess maybe their parents didn't do a good job of teaching them either.

Or maybe I'm being hypersensitive? I don't notice this as much from youngsters who are well adjusted and have close knit family relationships. However, I do feel like we are hitting an all time, historic low in terms of common courtesy... and an all time, historic high in terms of self-absorbed behavior.
Im 22, and I can't tell you how peeved I get when my peers disrespect our elders!!! OMG! Just a few weeks ago I took my Nema (g-ma) to get some bloodwork done. After we got signed in, we turned around so that we could look for a seat....the room was FULL (max capacity) of people all ages. We stood for a minute or so waiting to see if a younger person would let my Nema (with a CANE!) sit down, and no one budged! I had to actually SAY something, "Could somebody please give their seat to my Nema?" UGH! Makes me sick! I stood....no gentlemen offered me a seat!
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Old 10-02-2010, 08:47 PM
 
8,681 posts, read 6,968,169 times
Reputation: 14877
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melissa78703 View Post
C-D won't let me rep you again, darnit. But here:

I too went into business for myself and have, in the past, been a reporter (very independent field) and freelance writer. But, I've not been too "above it" to take the sh*tty jobs I had to take when I needed to take them -- and believe me, I have had a few sh*tty jobs. Not many, but enough to realize that they affected my perception of self-worth, and I will try not to do that again, if at all possible. Of course, if most of us end up in the service industry, slinging hash or picking up garbage, that's a different story.

I've picked up from prospective employers that the cell phone/Internet surfing during work hours is a huge problem with younger employees. I've interviewed for a few FT writing positions, and during the course of the interview was told that there was a policy against texting, cell phone calls and 'net surfing. It's hard not to feel a offended, because wasting my employer's time is not a part of my work ethic.

I did some contract work for a business that did not permit personal cell phones in the office, not even in purses. They had to be left at home or in your car. Computers were networked, but only two had Internet access, and these were overseen by supervisors who were in the room at all times to make sure that the Internet was used for work purposes only -- research and the like. That office had apparently had some serious "issues" in the past.

I have personally known people who've been fired for cell phone use, texting, etc. on the job, some of them Gen X. It's depressing.
Situations like the one you describe are another reason I went into business for myself. I was tired of putting up with b.s. like that because the Gen Yers in the office couldn't control themselves.

One of my tasks in my last day gig was to edit internal communications from on high before they went out to the entire company. At least once a week there was a babysitting email--things that basically said, "Do not discuss company business on Facebook," "in order to comply with SEC regulations, we read your emails to verify that you are not compromising client confidentiality, and by the way, stop clogging up our system with inappropriate jokes," and "just because the conference is in Vegas, that does not mean you have license to be a scantily clad, puking drunk on company time."

Not in so many words of course, but that was the gist of it. Then I had to edit an employee handbook. Lots of babysitting there, too. Finally, I went to HR and asked why they were spending so much time reminding staff of the most basic and remedial aspects of business etiquette, professionalism, responsibility with company equipment, etc. I noted that a number of 30- and 40-somethings were rolling their eyes at it and folks were beginning to feel like they weren't trusted.

The director of HR said, and I quote: "We have to do it because, unfortunately, some of the younger people on staff need to be told."

"May I suggest that you take it up directly with those who need the education? Because it is alienating the older staff, myself included. Reading these admonishments also wastes their time."

Unfortunately, this company had Boomers at the executive level and their kids at the junior level (lots of nepotism), and the executives were grossly parental about it. This filtered out into their training programs, too. There I was, 42 years old at the time, having to sit through three hours of training on how to answer the telephone in a professional environment. Really? Now there's a good use of my time and the company's money.

Needless to say, they had trouble with turnover among mid-level staff. Gee, I wonder why.
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:11 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 4,985,351 times
Reputation: 12317
Moodiness is age-blind. I know moody people of all ages and kind people of all ages.

Stereotyping all blacks - not okay.
Stereotyping all women - not okay.
Stereotyping all Jews - not okay.
Stereotyping all young people - oh yeah, that's okay.

Last edited by nimchimpsky; 10-02-2010 at 09:28 PM..
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:03 PM
 
85 posts, read 14,108 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avienne View Post
Here ya go, kid. Emphasis added so that you and they other hypersensitive Gen Yers here understand that I was not generalizing or that I fit into your description of "some people." You know, because it needs to be spelled out as the analytical thinking and ability to infer just aren't there. But hey, thanks for proving my point!
Sup, pot. Meet kettle. I don't read every post on here and take detailed notes. Frankly, many are not well-written, nor are they interesting - mostly full of b*tching, actually. I just read this one. The statements lacking qualifiers are bolded for your convenience. Perhaps you need practice expressing yourself with clarity.

Quote:
Gen Y has different motivations. They feel entitled to move up quickly, and they want to move up quickly so they can get more money, even as they live in their parents' homes until they are dang near 30. I don't get it, to be honest with you. My friends and I would have sooner slit our wrists than live with Mommy and Daddy after graduating college. Late 20s was right out.

And that, I think, is a Boomer failing. Boomers were the first generation to want to be their kids' friends. They blurred the lines between parent and child, and lucky Gen X gets to be stuck in the middle of that, seen as underlings by Boomers and peers by Gen Yers.

Sorry, but no. Gen Yers are not my professional peers. Get in line kids, and earn it like the rest of us had to.
Or did you just want a trophy for winning at message boards? I'll rep ya if it'll make you feel more smug, 'cause that's really what this is about.
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Old 10-02-2010, 10:15 PM
 
85 posts, read 14,108 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Moodiness is age-blind. I know moody people of all ages and kind people of all ages.

Stereotyping all blacks - not okay.
Stereotyping all women - not okay.
Stereotyping all Jews - not okay.
Stereotyping all young people - oh yeah, that's okay.
Look around City-Data. Stereotyping women, races, and religions is what some people do for sport on here.

In other words, welcome to the Internet, where every dog has his say.
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Old 10-03-2010, 12:38 AM
 
1,128 posts, read 1,153,372 times
Reputation: 1268
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avienne View Post
The director of HR said, and I quote: "We have to do it because, unfortunately, some of the younger people on staff need to be told."
Actually, I do understand why some of those "rules" had to be spelled out for everyone, inclusive -- it's unprofessional to take a certain group of people aside for specific instructions. And it's especially not appropriate to due it based on age, gender, race, sexual preference, etc., although that's what essentially is happening when a lot of the content in your company handbook is remedial "how to act professional at work" stuff.

And lest anyone think that I'm stereotyping the "youngsters," lemme tell you -- I had a huge issue with a lot of people in my own generation, too. No, they weren't living at home with mom and dad to micromanage their lives, but many people in my generation were completely unrealistic about life after university. They were going to travel the world, write the Great American Novel, become a famous director and be totally unique (!!!) -- each and every million. As a result, they ended up typical underachievers, working as part-time baristas and bag clerks at Whole Foods while writing crappy poetry and playing in garage bands, waiting for that big, miraculous break that was never going to happen, with far less to show for it by age 30-35 than their Boomer parents or bosses.

What was the ratio of these people, 1:2? 1:4? 1:10? I don't know. Enough for me to notice that they weren't uncommon.
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