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Old 02-12-2011, 12:49 AM
 
343 posts, read 272,295 times
Reputation: 603

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Something to think about:

Sharing our resting hours with our pets may be a source of psychological comfort, but because pets can bring a wide range of zoonotic pathogens into our environment, sharing is also associated with risks, the authors of the current study reported.

For example:
  • A 9-year-old boy from Arizona got the plague because he slept with his flea-infested cat.
  • A 48-year-old man and his wife repeatedly contracted MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), which their physicians eventually attributed to their dog. The animal "routinely slept in their bed and frequently licked their face," the California experts reported.
Kissing pets can also transmit zoonoses. A Japanese woman contacted meningitis after kissing her pet's face.

But disease can easily be transmitted by your pet kissing you. The study cited cases where a woman died of septic shock and renal failure after her cat, with whom she slept, licked open sores on her feet and toes. In another case, a 44-year-old man died of infection after his German shepherd puppy licked open abrasions on his hands.

Your pet's food can also be a source of disease. A study published last August in the journal Pediatrics tracked an outbreak of salmonella in 79 people between 2006 and 2008 that was caused by contaminated meat in dry cat and dog food.

Half of the victims were children, who CDC investigators said "might also have played with the pet food and then put their hands -- or the food itself -- in their mouths."

The disease also could have come from pets who rolled or played in their feces, where salmonella can stay alive for up to 12 weeks.

Where do our pets they pick up these diseases? Fleas are a likely starting point. And most of your pets will eat the droppings of other animals.

Take a dog to any beach, park or trail through the woods almost anywhere and watch the speed at which it will find something really foul-smelling and dead in which to roll.

Cats usually do their own killing for food and fun. And just think about the infectious bugs that laced the dead and dying rodents, birds and other critters they eat or try to bring into the home.

What Can Be Done?

The two senior veterinarians say several things can be done to reduce the threat of disease. The main one is for owners to ensure the health of their pets by seeking regular professional checkups and care. Other points include:
  • Persons, especially young children or immunocompromised persons, should be discouraged from sharing their bed with their pets or regularly kissing their pets.
  • Any area licked by a pet, especially an open wound, should be immediately washed with soap and water.
  • Pets should be kept free of parasites, especially fleas; routinely de-wormed; and regularly examined by a veterinarian.
  • Preventive measures such as administering anthelmintic drugs for flatworms -- and drugs for flukes, tapeworms and other parasites -- to puppies or kittens within the first few weeks after birth or, even better, to their mothers during the last few weeks of pregnancy. This could help prevent most cases of human toxocariasis, which can cause severe and sometimes permanent vision problems for young children.
The risk of getting sick from being close with your pets is real, but most of the diseases they pass on to humans can be identified and eliminated by regular veterinary care.

Meanwhile, start practicing saying "Get off the bed. I mean it this time."
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Old 02-12-2011, 01:07 AM
 
Location: ATL with a side of Chicago
3,625 posts, read 2,978,889 times
Reputation: 3825
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogwalker425 View Post
Send 'em on up! I do like certain cats, and they are usually the ones that act more like dogs. I used to sit for one cat that I wanted to bring home with me. He was basically a dog in a cat's body.

One of my brother's cats hates me. I'm not fond of the little b*tch, either. LOL
I have a tonkinese and a half-siamese. You can't get much more doglike than that!
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:12 AM
 
3,409 posts, read 2,255,081 times
Reputation: 1382
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna in AZ View Post
A second date with a guy revealed he did not want any animals. He didn't like them or see the reason why people would have them.
I could understand if he had allergies but he doesn't.

More dates down the road revealed a man not very warm, even to his children. I'm not sure if there is a correlation.
I don't have any animals right now but I do envision getting a dog or two at the most. Nothing crazy.

Also, how do you feel about people who have (in your view) too many animals? I have a girlfriend who has 5 cats and her boyfriend has one dog. They want to move in but their 'children' do not get along and neither will give them up. Would you give up your pet to be with the one you love or do you consider this to be a major impediment for compatibility?
If you have them or not isn't the question. It's if some stranger, friend or acquaintance's pet (mostly dogs) will have you? If your dog slurps, begs, rubs or whatever else they do on your potential prospect, you had them help choose. You didn't really know it at the time but they did just that. Dogs can sense what type of a person someone is. They are better at it than we are!
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:36 AM
 
566 posts, read 454,190 times
Reputation: 471
If I already had a dog then yeah, it'd be a dealbreaker for me. I generally don't like people who are cruel to animals to begin with.
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:46 AM
 
20,128 posts, read 15,408,412 times
Reputation: 16392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neemy View Post
If I meet someone who IS fond of throw-ups... THAT IS A SERIOUS DEALBREAKER!
Yeah... His name is Ralph...

I have always had dogs. Growing up they were not indoor dogs. I was relucatant to get an indoor dog.

There was one girl who wanted me to get rid of my dogs bird etc... I told her to shove off.
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:53 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
10,593 posts, read 22,744,569 times
Reputation: 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by SD4020 View Post
Yeah... His name is Ralph...

I have always had dogs. Growing up they were not indoor dogs. I was relucatant to get an indoor dog.

There was one girl who wanted me to get rid of my dogs bird etc... I told her to shove off.

That's terrible. I think I would probably be laughing as I was showing someone the door if they made a statement like I needed to get rid of my cats...as if.
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Old 02-12-2011, 02:56 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
10,593 posts, read 22,744,569 times
Reputation: 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna in AZ View Post
Something to think about:

Sharing our resting hours with our pets may be a source of psychological comfort, but because pets can bring a wide range of zoonotic pathogens into our environment, sharing is also associated with risks, the authors of the current study reported.

For example:
  • A 9-year-old boy from Arizona got the plague because he slept with his flea-infested cat.
  • A 48-year-old man and his wife repeatedly contracted MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), which their physicians eventually attributed to their dog. The animal "routinely slept in their bed and frequently licked their face," the California experts reported.
Kissing pets can also transmit zoonoses. A Japanese woman contacted meningitis after kissing her pet's face.

But disease can easily be transmitted by your pet kissing you. The study cited cases where a woman died of septic shock and renal failure after her cat, with whom she slept, licked open sores on her feet and toes. In another case, a 44-year-old man died of infection after his German shepherd puppy licked open abrasions on his hands.

Your pet's food can also be a source of disease. A study published last August in the journal Pediatrics tracked an outbreak of salmonella in 79 people between 2006 and 2008 that was caused by contaminated meat in dry cat and dog food.

Half of the victims were children, who CDC investigators said "might also have played with the pet food and then put their hands -- or the food itself -- in their mouths."

The disease also could have come from pets who rolled or played in their feces, where salmonella can stay alive for up to 12 weeks.

Where do our pets they pick up these diseases? Fleas are a likely starting point. And most of your pets will eat the droppings of other animals.

Take a dog to any beach, park or trail through the woods almost anywhere and watch the speed at which it will find something really foul-smelling and dead in which to roll.

Cats usually do their own killing for food and fun. And just think about the infectious bugs that laced the dead and dying rodents, birds and other critters they eat or try to bring into the home.

What Can Be Done?

The two senior veterinarians say several things can be done to reduce the threat of disease. The main one is for owners to ensure the health of their pets by seeking regular professional checkups and care. Other points include:
  • Persons, especially young children or immunocompromised persons, should be discouraged from sharing their bed with their pets or regularly kissing their pets.
  • Any area licked by a pet, especially an open wound, should be immediately washed with soap and water.
  • Pets should be kept free of parasites, especially fleas; routinely de-wormed; and regularly examined by a veterinarian.
  • Preventive measures such as administering anthelmintic drugs for flatworms -- and drugs for flukes, tapeworms and other parasites -- to puppies or kittens within the first few weeks after birth or, even better, to their mothers during the last few weeks of pregnancy. This could help prevent most cases of human toxocariasis, which can cause severe and sometimes permanent vision problems for young children.
The risk of getting sick from being close with your pets is real, but most of the diseases they pass on to humans can be identified and eliminated by regular veterinary care.

Meanwhile, start practicing saying "Get off the bed. I mean it this time."
That's not going to keep me from sleeping with my cats. I have done so for more then 20 years. We don't do any kissing though and I take care of my pets, they do not ever have fleas and they get regular baths, just like anyone I would have in my bed...lol.
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:06 AM
 
20,128 posts, read 15,408,412 times
Reputation: 16392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lindsey_Mcfarren View Post
That's terrible. I think I would probably be laughing as I was showing someone the door if they made a statement like I needed to get rid of my cats...as if.
I did give my cat a new home after the ex left. I liked the cat. But I thought someone else could give him a better home.

Yeah... She was wanting to make major overhaul of everything I had, and owned. It wasn't going to work.

I am glad the one I am with now, is a bigtime dog fan.
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:44 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
10,593 posts, read 22,744,569 times
Reputation: 6090
Quote:
Originally Posted by SD4020 View Post
I did give my cat a new home after the ex left. I liked the cat. But I thought someone else could give him a better home.

Yeah... She was wanting to make major overhaul of everything I had, and owned. It wasn't going to work.

I am glad the one I am with now, is a bigtime dog fan.
I have panic attacks and anxiety... my cats make a big difference in how I feel day to day. They are a necessity in my life. Its that simple.
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Old 02-12-2011, 03:45 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
5,101 posts, read 4,200,243 times
Reputation: 8080
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobokenkitchen View Post
Our furniture and rugs are not pet friendly at all. But you literally wouln't know that we have a pet to look at our stuff. We are really lucky though. I'm sure training & plenty of exercise make a huge difference, but we're just lucky that her temprement seems to fit us so well.
My furnishings are apparently pet-friendly. They certainly like to lie on the furniture, particularly when they're sharing it with me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobokenkitchen View Post
One of my best girl friends doesn't get on with animals and even she does well with our dog - we just make sure she's nowhere near the dining table when we eat.
She wouldn't be my friend.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobokenkitchen View Post
She doesn't beg but I think she gets skeaved at the thought of a dog anywhere near food which I TOTALLY understand. I've seen people let their dog eat of plates used for humans. I could never eat there again!
I assume that you do wash your dishes; do you think that an animal casts a spell on a plate or a pot?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dogwalker425 View Post
If I see a cute furry animal, I just want to pick it up and hug and kiss and cuddle it. Most cats don't like that.
That depends upon the cat. Some cats even enjoy having dogs kiss them and lick them, even taking the cat's whole head in his or her mouth. Many cats follow dogs all over the house. Cats as well as dogs can develop separation anxiety. Once, when my maid, a regular, was at my house, I took both of my dogs to the vet, leaving the cat at home. When I returned, she told me that my cat had cried the whole time. I have taken my dogs to the groomer and returned home. My cat was fine. But he needed to have either me or the dogs around.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sierraAZ View Post
“It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.”

Jiddu Krishnamurti
That's certain. Look, for example, at Mexico where bullfighting is considered legitimate. Mexicans who are involved in the prevention of cruelty to animals always point out that if it were not for Europe and the US, they'd be almost without any financial support.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna in AZ View Post
Something to think about:

Sharing our resting hours with our pets may be a source of psychological comfort, but because pets can bring a wide range of zoonotic pathogens into our environment, sharing is also associated with risks, the authors of the current study reported.

For example:
  • A 9-year-old boy from Arizona got the plague because he slept with his flea-infested cat.
  • A 48-year-old man and his wife repeatedly contracted MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), which their physicians eventually attributed to their dog. The animal "routinely slept in their bed and frequently licked their face," the California experts reported.
Kissing pets can also transmit zoonoses. A Japanese woman contacted meningitis after kissing her pet's face.

But disease can easily be transmitted by your pet kissing you. The study cited cases where a woman died of septic shock and renal failure after her cat, with whom she slept, licked open sores on her feet and toes. In another case, a 44-year-old man died of infection after his German shepherd puppy licked open abrasions on his hands.

Your pet's food can also be a source of disease. A study published last August in the journal Pediatrics tracked an outbreak of salmonella in 79 people between 2006 and 2008 that was caused by contaminated meat in dry cat and dog food.

Half of the victims were children, who CDC investigators said "might also have played with the pet food and then put their hands -- or the food itself -- in their mouths."

The disease also could have come from pets who rolled or played in their feces, where salmonella can stay alive for up to 12 weeks."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna in AZ View Post
Meanwhile, start practicing saying "Get off the bed. I mean it this time."
They apparently provided all the anecdotal evidence they could find. More people are struck by lightning every year. I guarantee that far more people have contracted diseases from family members. Remember, the CDC is the outfit that predicted that there would be forty million cases of AIDS by 1988. I definitely recall reading that in the early Eighties.

Animals have been kissing me and licking me and sharing my food and sleeping with me for over sixty-seven years; I'm still alive. If I were in the market for a wife or girlfriend, or even a one time dinner engagement, I wouldn't even consider one who didn't have at least one of her own.

Last edited by Happy in Wyoming; 02-12-2011 at 03:53 AM..
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