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Old 07-28-2019, 07:16 AM
 
1,743 posts, read 1,264,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Itzpapalotl View Post
Way to generalize there, mah man!

Yes, because its a generalization that is widely TRUE for that population.

It's no different from saying that:
"men are more prone to commit felonies"
"men are more prone to kill their wives as opposed to women killing their husbands"


They are generalities and based on STATISTICS


So yeah, women are definitely predisposed to certain behaviors and preferences, whether rationally derived or not, and that does not include autism
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Old 07-28-2019, 07:29 AM
 
476 posts, read 92,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonym9428 View Post
Yes, because its a generalization that is widely TRUE for that population.

It's no different from saying that:
"men are more prone to commit felonies"
"men are more prone to kill their wives as opposed to women killing their husbands"


They are generalities and based on STATISTICS


So yeah, women are definitely predisposed to certain behaviors and preferences, whether rationally derived or not, and that does not include autism
So, I suppose, if I were to ask you for the source of those statistics, you'd have no problem in supporting your position?

Also, just an FYI, having a prevalent group trend does not mean that every member of a group has that trend or exhibits that trend to the same degree. This is a common statistical fallacy. So again, way to generalize there.
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Old 07-28-2019, 07:33 AM
 
1,743 posts, read 1,264,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Itzpapalotl View Post
Also, just an FYI, having a prevalent group trend does not mean that every member of a group has that trend or exhibits that trend to the same degree. This is a common statistical fallacy. So again, way to generalize there.
What?!!

I seriously had no clue.

Thanks for the education on basic statistical reasoning.

You're a genius

Last edited by tonym9428; 07-28-2019 at 08:15 AM..
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Old 07-28-2019, 08:16 AM
 
Location: a primitive state
9,897 posts, read 20,212,257 times
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I know several people who are probably on the spectrum who are married or in long-term relationships.
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Old 07-28-2019, 08:20 AM
 
388 posts, read 75,332 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Itzpapalotl View Post
Autism is a really broad spectrum. At its higher end, relationship wouldn't even be on the cards, since the person would have difficulty in engaging; at its lower end its symptoms are often dismissed as personal quirks by those not in the know, which shouldn't hinder personal connections with the right person.
Precisely.

As Chick Hearn would have said "Slaaaaaaaaaaam Dunk!"
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:33 AM
 
20,786 posts, read 16,755,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azureth View Post
Would you, and generally, do you think guys with it have much of a chance finding a woman?
Comedian Amy Schumer married a man with autism, they just had a baby. Her latest standup special called “Growing” ” talks about his autism how she found out about it ( after she fell flat on her face during one of their dates and when she looked at him he was just staring at her and didn’t make a move to say anything or help her up LOL) how she reacted and the impact it has on their relationship. It’s very funny.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Mc6z5coqgTM

You can watch the standup special for free on Netflix if you’re interested.
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:40 AM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
7,239 posts, read 4,676,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonym9428 View Post
Any type of physical or mental disability will always make dating much harder?

This is especially for men, because women want to date men who "have it together" and are "like their fathers"

I have cerebral palsy and while I date here and there, it's a kiss of death.....so be prepared
Yeah, no. “Women” are not a monolith. We don’t all want the same things. The men I have dated, and married, are nothing like my father.

In answer to your question, OP, it depends on where the individual falls on the spectrum and how their traits manifest in the relationship. Even among individuals with HFASD, there can be challenges with interpersonal skills, empathy, the ability to see things from others’ perspective, etc. My first husband has HFASD and communication and emotional intimacy was a challenge at different points of our marriage.

For those who find out or get a diagnosis in their adult years, they can be at a disadvantage due to lacking the tools and resources that therapy provides during their adolescence and formative years. We have two kids with ASD and I have no doubt that our son would struggle in a relationship without the proper tools and therapy, especially as it relates to interpersonal interaction, conversational reciprocity, black and white thinking, etc. I doubt our daughter has any real interest in dating in the future and it would be a struggle for her as well, though their traits manifest in completely different ways.

In any case, I have friends, women, on the spectrum that are married and have a good support system. It’s just going to be highly dependent on many different factors.
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:49 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
22,811 posts, read 28,941,149 times
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Date a guy with autism? Sure. He'd have to be fully capable of taking care of himself and earning an income. I'm not going to adopt a crippled baby bird that has to be cared for and supported, but I can accept a few quirks in a good hearted honest guy.


The same with any other disability. In a wheel chair? Sure, as long as he is fully capable of taking care of himself. Blind? No problem, as long as he is fully capable of taking care of himself.


Alcoholic? Well, no. Pass on that one. I prefer good hearted, honest, and not destructive.


A lot of people with disabilities can be good company. Capable of holding a conversation would be important. I have to enjoy hanging out with them.
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Old 07-28-2019, 09:53 AM
 
Location: South Bay Native
13,431 posts, read 22,002,377 times
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I am socially aware to a degree that my choices and actions are measured by how they will affect others around me, be that driving in my car, shopping in the grocery store, standing in line for tickets or coffee, etc. I could not be comfortable in a relationship with someone who is unaware of these aspects of a social life. The good news is, those with ASD can learn how to behave appropriately in social situations. They may not grasp the reasons behind social graces, but they can learn to be, essentially, imitators of these skills.

One thing I must stress, though - deception by omission is a form of misrepresentation (i.e. lying), is manipulative, and don't be surprised if and when your dishonesty rears its ugly little head that your partner yeets you. Just be honest and upfront about who you are and let the chips fall where they may. You may lose the interest of many, but would you really want to be with someone who doesn't accept you for who you are? Be with someone who knows from the start what your peccadilloes are and gain the love of an earnest heart. I don't know anyone who wants to date a manipulative person, but I know many who are dating on the spectrum.
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Old 07-28-2019, 10:26 AM
 
97 posts, read 39,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
How old are you OP? I was just wondering, cause I wasn't sure how much rejection you would have had based on your age so far.
33. Never had a relationship before, and apparently I've been told I come off as "creepy" a lot of the time, and I don't know why, I've never say inappropriately touched a woman except when I was in HS and cut a girls hair (made a topic about it).
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