U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Relationships
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-03-2008, 02:54 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
16,237 posts, read 18,713,304 times
Reputation: 24683
If you feel like being fair, tell her her specific shortcomings and tell her her job performance has not been acceptable. If she still fails to perform, then you have every right to set her free to slack off in someone else's house.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-03-2008, 03:31 PM
 
25,170 posts, read 33,142,835 times
Reputation: 6678
write out job duties and have her follow it. PLain and simple be a better boss.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
If you feel like being fair, tell her her specific shortcomings and tell her her job performance has not been acceptable. If she still fails to perform, then you have every right to set her free to slack off in someone else's house.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-03-2008, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Apple Valley Calif
7,334 posts, read 11,291,075 times
Reputation: 4892
Quote:
Originally Posted by figs View Post
I've had a housekeeper for a few years whose work has seriously started to slack. She's kind of like a member of the family now. Any suggestions how I should break the news to her?

Thanks!
She is not a member of the family, she is an employee. As soon as you start treating an employee as a member of the family, you are destroying a good working relationship, so now she can take adbvantage of you.
Tell her to shape up, or ship out, and quit thinking of her as a friend/member of the family.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2008, 01:14 AM
 
126 posts, read 162,017 times
Reputation: 128
So her work has gotten worse and even though she's become "part of the family" you want to kick her out the door? God, I'd hate to be your elderly mother.

Ever thought of talking to her first? Maybe she's having financial, family or health problems. Give the lady a chance for God's sake, before kicking her to the curb.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2008, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Weston, FL
2,822 posts, read 8,674,873 times
Reputation: 1808
Quote:
Originally Posted by figs View Post
I've had a housekeeper for a few years whose work has seriously started to slack. She's kind of like a member of the family now. Any suggestions how I should break the news to her?

Thanks!
First have a talk with her about her performance and see if there is any improvement.

Here are a few graceful ways of letting someone go:

1. "Times are financially tough right now, so please let me call you when things have changed. I understand perfectly if you give my time slot to someone else. "

2. "We are doing some remodeling work right now and it won't be possible to clean properly until the work is done. Let me call you when that happens and in the meantime, I understand perfectly if you need to give my timeslot to someone else."

3. "We are doing a lot of traveling right now and won't be home. When our schedule has settled down, I will give you a call. Of course, if you need to give my time slot to someone else, I will understand perfectly."

Sad to say, the housekeepers we have had in recent years appear to care about the home they are cleaning, but it turns out they really don't care. I had a valuable Chinese scroll that my housekeeper of three years hit and it tore in half. She hung the torn part on the wall and put the other half on my chair. She didn't call -- nothing. When I came home and saw this, I was in shock. When I called her that evening to find out what had happened and why she didn't call me -- it became very clear. She said "Oh, I was going to call you..." right - this was 9 o'clock in the evening and she had left our home at 1 pm.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2008, 07:19 AM
 
1,464 posts, read 1,564,802 times
Reputation: 1091
why lie and bull**** her
just be honest
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-07-2008, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Derby, KS
3,832 posts, read 7,727,479 times
Reputation: 1556
Quote:
Originally Posted by figs View Post
I've had a housekeeper for a few years whose work has seriously started to slack. She's kind of like a member of the family now. Any suggestions how I should break the news to her?

Thanks!
Not my housekeeper but I had a similar situation a few years back. We had a lady that would watch our kids every day at her house so we wouldn't have to take them to a daycare center. It was always my opinion that it could turn sour if we developed a personal relationship with her.

This was the problem in a nutshell. She was addicted to shopping. She had credit accts in all the major department stores and all the accts were maxed out. So she needed our money to pay for her addiction. When we started having her watch our kids we had no idea about her credit woes. One day my wife was off work and went shopping with her and the kids. When they were leaving the mall she asked my wife if she could stop at a bank. She was going to apply for a consolidation loan....and she asked my wife if she would co-sign on the loan. OK up until then I had no problems with her but I am not going to be party to her personal finacial issues.

Also around that time she was getting very lazy in the manner that she was taking care of our youngest child who was just turning 1 yr. So we agreed that it was time to sever the relationship.

My wife was insistant that we tell her exactly why we wanted to seek a different child care provider. I, on the other hand, wanted to just say anything to make the situation go away without causing any backlash. We needed her to watch the kids a few more weeks until school was out so we needed dependable child care.

I basically just told her that times were tough for us finacially and we would be unable to continue to pay her after school was out and that we wanted to give her sufficient heads-up so she could find somewhere else to work.

Well we had to deal with about 2 weeks of cold shoulder before it was all done but there you have it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Relationships
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:55 PM.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top