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Old 11-30-2010, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Pawnee Nation
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter Greenspan View Post
That's the first Cherokee greeting I've ever received.
He's good that way............
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Old 12-01-2010, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter Greenspan View Post
The 4th of July is more akin to to Israeli Independence Day, rather than Chanukah ???
The Hasmonean Revolution against the Seleucids (i.e., Syrians) is the reason for the establishment of Chanukah. It was a revolution not any different from ours in 1775-81, and resulted in the re-establishment of Judea as an independent state.

The story about the menorah--that there was only enough oil to light the Temple lights for one night, but miraculously lasted for eight--gave the occasion its religious overtones. But Chanukah's real origins are political, if not military: we celebrate that revolt because it succeeded. I'm interested to know what cultures in history have celebrated revolutions that failed.
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Old 12-01-2010, 02:30 PM
 
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Fred314X, I was thinking more how they were celebrated not what they were celebrating.
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Old 12-01-2010, 03:45 PM
 
Location: You want kimchi with that?
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"It is bitterly ironic that this holiday, which has its roots in a revolution against assimilation and the suppression of Jewish religion, has become the most assimilated, secular holiday on the Jewish calendar."

Not really. It gives secular Jews permission to NOT celebrate Christmas, to affirm (secularly, and assimidatedly) their own difference, and to do so by affirming (historically accurately or not) a holiday that "celebrates religious freedom". Its a rejection of assimilation, though not the kind of rejection the Maccabees or Chazal would have approved of. Its really a very logical development.
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Old 12-01-2010, 03:49 PM
 
Location: You want kimchi with that?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred314X View Post
The Hasmonean Revolution against the Seleucids (i.e., Syrians) is the reason for the establishment of Chanukah. It was a revolution not any different from ours in 1775-81, and resulted in the re-establishment of Judea as an independent state.

The story about the menorah--that there was only enough oil to light the Temple lights for one night, but miraculously lasted for eight--gave the occasion its religious overtones. But Chanukah's real origins are political, if not military: we celebrate that revolt because it succeeded. I'm interested to know what cultures in history have celebrated revolutions that failed.
But the Talmud doesn't even mention the revolt. At all. And the haftarah portion chosen for Shabbat Chanukah, includes "not by might, not by power, but by My spirit alone" - something of a rejection of the political.
Only in later generations did the fear of a revival of political messianism recede enough to let the Maccabees back into the celebration. The story of the meaning of Chanukah shows how Jews have reinvented our holidays and traditions to meet the needs of the time, even before todays "secular Chanukah"
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Old 12-02-2010, 05:15 AM
 
Location: Bay Area, CA
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Happy Chanukah! I actually forgot it started tonight, LOL... easy to forget when you're not a kid anticipating gifts, I suppose. I'll light the candles tomorrow night, though!
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Old 12-02-2010, 06:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
Happy Chanukah! I actually forgot it started tonight, LOL... easy to forget when you're not a kid anticipating gifts, I suppose. I'll light the candles tomorrow night, though!

lol well I have kids anticipating gifts but I have to admit I absolutely get giddy waiting for Chanukah to arrive. Tonight we go see the ice menorah the Chabad lights here in town and have sufganyiot. Tonight Chinese food takeout and we are watching The Last Airbender. And of course the kids get a gift and gelt.
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Old 12-02-2010, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn
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Oh, in case I didn't say so before, Happy Chanukah to all.

(What's the deal with these new candles--you never seem to get green ones any more!)
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Old 12-05-2010, 09:29 AM
 
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Default Singing Chanukah Menorah candles

First, from left to right, omitting the middle candle, click on, and then click off, each individual candle to see what they each do separately, and then click on the Shamas candle (that's the red one in the middle).

Singing Chanukah Menorah candles


The Chanukah Menorah candles are singing "Mi Yemalel" ("Who Can Retell?")

The transliteration (Hebrew written in English):

Mi yemalel g'vurot Yisra-el,
Otan mi yimneh?
Hen b'khol dor yakum hagibor,
Go-el ha-am.

Mi yemalel g'vurot Yisra-el,
Otan mi yimneh?
Hen b'khol dor yakum hagibor,
Go-el ha-am.

Sh'ma! Bayamim hahem bazman hazeh,
Makabi moshiyah ufodeh -
Uv'yamenu kol am Yisra-el,
Yit'ahed, yakum veyiga-el.

Mi yemalel g'vurot Yisra-el,
Otan mi yimneh?
Hen b'khol dor yakum hagibor,
Go-el ha-am.


A less than literal, but singable translation:

Who can retell,
the things that befell us,
Who can count them?
In every age a hero or sage,
Came to our aid.

Hark! In days of yore in
Israel's ancient land,
Brave Maccabeus led the
faithful band.
But now all Israel must as one
arise,
Redeem itself through deed and
sacrifice.

Who can retell,
the things that befell us,
Who can count them?
In every age a hero or sage,
Came to our aid.
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