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Old 03-08-2011, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 39,543,041 times
Reputation: 10886

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikebnllnb View Post
Solid scientific findings are not just "trust me this is true" type of findings. They can and are verified in many ways. The chemical composition of oxygen or that of hydrogen are unquestionable. Verbal gymnastics and flawed reasoning will not change that fact. There are somethings that are proven beyond question. Your argument seems to be that nothing can be proven with 100% accuracy. Proving something with 100% certainty is hard but not impossible.
Why do you call the color of this icon -------> "red"? How do you know it's red? What made you choose to call it red? Why couldn't it be violet? Because someone told you that it was red, and you just came to accept it? Because other people thought it was red?

I have no proof that it's red.

 
Old 03-08-2011, 05:31 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
8,388 posts, read 7,937,410 times
Reputation: 4070
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
The two are invisible gases. Taking high school chemistry wouldn't help any.

or, wait, we are TOLD they are invisible gases, I guess we're supposed to take their word on faith.

You're right. Taking chemistry wouldn't help you. At all.
 
Old 03-08-2011, 05:50 PM
 
4,470 posts, read 4,119,503 times
Reputation: 3967
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
Why do you call the color of this icon -------> "red"? How do you know it's red? What made you choose to call it red? Why couldn't it be violet? Because someone told you that it was red, and you just came to accept it? Because other people thought it was red?

I have no proof that it's red.

Its named Red that has nothing to do with the wavelength of Red. Your talking about language not science.
 
Old 03-09-2011, 03:20 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 39,543,041 times
Reputation: 10886
Quote:
Originally Posted by skoro View Post
You're right. Taking chemistry wouldn't help you. At all.
Only because you can't see something that's invisible. And if you can't see it, how are you going to prove it's there?

I guess I'd just have to take your word for it, and I am NOT willing to do that. I need personal proof.
 
Old 03-09-2011, 03:27 AM
 
7,811 posts, read 4,914,444 times
Reputation: 2970
Thankfully no one in the scientific world thinks that you have to personally be able to see something in order to establish it is there. If people operated at this level of ridiculous standards of proof there would be no science done anywhere. Demanding ridiculous standards of proof might be useful for trolling people on a forum, but it sure is not useful in the world of science.

“invisible” gases have weight, they exert pressure and other forces, they have chemical effects on other substances, any yes they can be observed using atomic microscopes and their atoms visually observed. They can also be made visible by freezing, unless you think you are freezing something that is not there and magically something solid appears.

Direct observation is far from the only tool science has in proving things, as even the worst troll here on the forum knows but chooses to ignore. Inference and prediction alone are the platforms for most of science today.
 
Old 03-09-2011, 03:38 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 39,543,041 times
Reputation: 10886
It isn't ridiculous. What's ridiculous is taking someone else's word for something. There are people, after all, who claim that God exists--are you going to take them at their word? They claim to have experienced God--are you going to take them at their word?

No, and there's no logical reason that you should accept someone else's experience as proof.
 
Old 03-09-2011, 03:42 AM
 
7,811 posts, read 4,914,444 times
Reputation: 2970
At what point did I suggest you should?
 
Old 03-09-2011, 03:54 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 39,543,041 times
Reputation: 10886
When you suggested that I simply believe in scientific data because someone else SAYS it is so. That hydrogen has an atomic number of 2, for instance. I agree that it is possible that it does, but I'm not going to take their word for it, and automatically believe it to be true.
 
Old 03-09-2011, 03:58 AM
 
7,811 posts, read 4,914,444 times
Reputation: 2970
Quote:
Originally Posted by TKramar View Post
When you suggested that I simply believe in scientific data because someone else SAYS it is so.
Never said this. Quote me please.
 
Old 03-09-2011, 04:17 AM
 
Location: Bradenton, Florida
27,236 posts, read 39,543,041 times
Reputation: 10886
Thankfully no one in the scientific world thinks that you have to personally be able to see something in order to establish it is there.

No, in the scientific world, you accept the results of someone else's research...
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