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Old 07-11-2011, 02:21 AM
 
4 posts, read 3,476 times
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I'm so happy I found this website today as it seems to be very informative and helpful. However, I wanted to know if any Christian parents ever felt guilty for not sending their child(ren) to Christian schools. I have all three of my children in a good Christian school, but the cost of tuition is a major concern. I'm not sure if I can go the entire K-12 like I want and now I'm considering a cheaper alternative. I feel extremely guilty about this and have absolutely no peace when it comes to education outside of Christianity. I don't know how to deal with all this uneasiness.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:25 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,027,829 times
Reputation: 7701
What is there to feel guilty about? If you can't afford it, you just can't afford it. Maybe that's God's way of letting you know He doesn't want your kids in that school. After all, what He calls you to do, He empowers you to do and if the money to pay for it isn't there, it's a prettty clear indication to me that you ought to consider something else.

And, in any case, what's wrong with public schools? I know you hear a lot from people about secularization and liberalism in public schools, but so what? Your kids have to live in this world and if they're not prepared to do so, you're doing them a disservice by keeping them separated from it. Jesus didn't tell us to be apart from the rest of the world. We are called to remain in it, but not be OF it, and so-called Christian schools disobey that injunction.

Not only that, but most of the ones I've explored or are familiar with cripple their students for life because they don't educate, they indoctrinate, which does little to prepare them for real life. And, some are downright dangerous in that they are highly militarized, such as the ALERT Academy in Big Sandy, TX. They're not just turning out educated young adults, they're building future Christian soldiers! It's scary and they're not the only ones by a long shot.
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Philippines
461 posts, read 493,790 times
Reputation: 215
I attended parochial school (Lutheran-Missouri Synod) for the first eight years of my school life. I was shocked into paralysis when I attended my first high school. The first time I heard a "bad" word, I wanted to run for cover: I was certain that God was going to strike that person dead, and I did not want to be in the vicinity when it happened.

I'm not kidding.

Of course, it did not help to grow up in a household where my father enjoyed taking his frustrations with life on my rear-end. My mother tried to lock me in my room so that I would not get some girl pregnant at the age of ten.

So, coupled with an unrealistic fear of a God who sat on the modern throne of Mt. Olympus who would brook no misconduct (as per my teachers and pastor), it is a wonder that I was not institutionalized as a child.

I sent my first four children to a Lutheran parochial school for their first eight years. But then my children had too "advantages": 1) I am a theologian. 2) I refused to be my parents.

Only one of my first four children decided to continue in the Lutheran church as a teacher. All four of them, however, figured out for themselves what is mythology and what can be accepted into their own kind of faith. Even though they received a good, sound, fundamental Christian teaching in their formative years, they were smart enough to investigate on their own what is religious chaff and religious wheat.

And they are doing just fine.

Juxtapose this with my last two children:

1. My Korean daughter attends a Baptist-oriented international school. She is pretty straight-headed when it comes to the realities of life and the fantasies of religion.

2. My Filipina daughter attends a Catholic-oriented school. And she is pretty straight-headed in the same manner.

Bottom line: kids are pretty maleable. You can try to indoctrinate them in a certain way, but as long as they are in touch with the real world (I wasn't allowed), then they, too, will be tempered with the realities of the real world.

Strict religious training (regardless of sect, creed, or belief) attempts to create an unreal existence in this material world. The problem is elemental. God did not want people to isolate themselves from the world, such as the Essenes. From the Old Testament onward (look at the great lament by Isaiah), God wants people to be the light of the world. Not necessarily preaching and teaching but to get along and be examples of good living and productivity with people from all walks of life. And public schools do not, somehow, cut people off from their view of God. After all, parents--my generation, at least--had a "hands-off" approach to their children. They didn't want to be like their abusive parents and swung the pendulum all the way to the other side. Your generation is making contact with your children, and as actions speak volumes over words, you'll be teaching your children how you would like them to act, and then they will wisely (hopefully) chose their own destinies.
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Old 07-11-2011, 04:50 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,568 posts, read 21,741,355 times
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The history of "Christian Schools" is problematic for me at best.
The "Christian School Movement" (I am not referring to parochial schools, which have a different genisis) began not so coincidentally at the same time as desegregation became law of the land.

It is hard to find a "Christian School" that began before the late sixties and early 70s.

"Christian Schools" teach creationism and a literal interpretation of the bible.
My church does not teach these things.
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Old 07-12-2011, 05:37 PM
 
Location: East Coast U.S.
1,513 posts, read 1,396,883 times
Reputation: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by f1ndingmyway View Post
I'm so happy I found this website today as it seems to be very informative and helpful. However, I wanted to know if any Christian parents ever felt guilty for not sending their child(ren) to Christian schools. I have all three of my children in a good Christian school, but the cost of tuition is a major concern. I'm not sure if I can go the entire K-12 like I want and now I'm considering a cheaper alternative. I feel extremely guilty about this and have absolutely no peace when it comes to education outside of Christianity. I don't know how to deal with all this uneasiness.
Have you considered home schooling?
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Old 07-13-2011, 01:59 AM
 
4 posts, read 3,476 times
Reputation: 10
@ stillkit

"What is there to feel guilty about?"

Well, I feel guilty because I really want my kids to get a formal Christian education. In addition to what I teach them and church, I know that this exposure will plant my kids firmly on a Christian foundation.

"And, in any case, what's wrong with public schools?"

It's not biblically based.
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Old 07-13-2011, 02:04 AM
 
4 posts, read 3,476 times
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@tiget--Yes, I've thought about it a few times. However, I don't know for sure if I have the patience for homeschooling. I homeschool now because it's the summer time but don't know about doing it all year.
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Old 07-13-2011, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX
31,777 posts, read 24,001,037 times
Reputation: 12105
Quote:
Originally Posted by f1ndingmyway View Post
I'm so happy I found this website today as it seems to be very informative and helpful. However, I wanted to know if any Christian parents ever felt guilty for not sending their child(ren) to Christian schools. I have all three of my children in a good Christian school, but the cost of tuition is a major concern. I'm not sure if I can go the entire K-12 like I want and now I'm considering a cheaper alternative. I feel extremely guilty about this and have absolutely no peace when it comes to education outside of Christianity. I don't know how to deal with all this uneasiness.
Can't speak as a parent, but as one of the (two) children, I'm glad my parents were able to differentiate between Sunday School and a School to get educated and build a career. I studied in a private (Catholic) school run, however, that didn't shove religious beliefs/studies down everybody's throat.
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Old 07-13-2011, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Northern VA (for now)
23,000 posts, read 31,942,334 times
Reputation: 30377
Quote:
Originally Posted by f1ndingmyway View Post
I'm so happy I found this website today as it seems to be very informative and helpful. However, I wanted to know if any Christian parents ever felt guilty for not sending their child(ren) to Christian schools. I have all three of my children in a good Christian school, but the cost of tuition is a major concern. I'm not sure if I can go the entire K-12 like I want and now I'm considering a cheaper alternative. I feel extremely guilty about this and have absolutely no peace when it comes to education outside of Christianity. I don't know how to deal with all this uneasiness.
My mother actually had me in a private Christian school for 1st-3rd grade b/c she was a strong Christian and the schools in the city we were living in were mediocre. Then she moved to a better public school system b/c it was cheaper to pay higher housing cost than tuition at the Christian school. So I want for a secular education for 4th grade through graduation. I'm still a Christian (err, I still believe in the god of the Bible) because my mother actually modeled her faith in a decent way not b/c I had formal Christian education. I know a lot of kids who went to Christian schools but went crazy at 18 when out in the real world. The key is to while exposing them in the real world tell them the reasoning for why things are the way they are and more importantly model Christianity for them. That will be much more effective than trusting a Christian school to do all the work.
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Old 07-13-2011, 04:05 PM
Status: "Build the damn wall!" (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: The Haunted Mansion
15,134 posts, read 8,222,812 times
Reputation: 1543
My kids went to public school K-12 and it did not have any negative effect on their Christian upbringing, as far as I can tell. We made sure they got a Christian education (at home & in church) in addition to their school education.
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