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Old 07-30-2011, 10:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
Yahweh adds vowels where none exist. In YHWH the W is silent. Thus it becomes YHH. Also its the spelling used when a prayer in not being recited and the word Hashem (the name) is stated in it place. If a prayer is being recited then YY would be its transliteral spelling and the word Adonai (sir) is used in its place.
Original Hebrew is not written with vowels, but the letters yod hey vav hey -YHWH- all serve as aspirated 'consonants' in YHWH [whose name means Breath/Life], and Josephus states that they are that -"four "vowels", written on the turban of the High Priest, which means there are no consonants spoken and one "breathes" the name.

 
Old 07-30-2011, 11:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Original Hebrew is not written with vowels,
Hebrew or Aramaic are taught with vowels in place. Once the language is learned then the vowels are removed and words are pronounced based on the context of the sentence they are in. During the learning phase the words we are talking about have conflicting vowels that do not flow making them unpronouncable. Thus the english version has given them vowels that flow and thus giving g-d a name. Neither Hebrew, Aramaic or Arabic state that name.
 
Old 07-30-2011, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Marion, North Dakota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
Hebrew or Aramaic are taught with vowels in place. Once the language is learned then the vowels are removed and words are pronounced based on the context of the sentence they are in. During the learning phase the words we are talking about have conflicting vowels that do not flow making them unpronouncable. Thus the english version has given them vowels that flow and thus giving g-d a name. Neither Hebrew, Aramaic or Arabic state that name.
True, Hebrew, Phoenician, Arabic and Aramaic are all dialects of a single language and we have very similar alphapets, and spelling rules. Vowels are seldom used and in most words all that is needed are the first, middle and last letter.
 
Old 07-30-2011, 06:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
Hebrew or Aramaic are taught with vowels in place. Once the language is learned then the vowels are removed and words are pronounced based on the context of the sentence they are in. During the learning phase the words we are talking about have conflicting vowels that do not flow making them unpronouncable. Thus the english version has given them vowels that flow and thus giving g-d a name. Neither Hebrew, Aramaic or Arabic state that name.
There were no vowel marks or vowel etymons at all in ancient Hebrew, but certain consonants could and can serve as "vowels".
 
Old 07-30-2011, 08:19 PM
 
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Quote:
There were no vowel marks
Really.

Welcome to LearnAssyrian.com. Learn the Syriac-Aramaic language and Assyrian history
 
Old 07-30-2011, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Marion, North Dakota
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The Syriac Aramaic is actually Pe****ta and a fairly new language, based upon Aramaic, but actually from the Greeks in an attempt to reconstruct an Aramaic Bible. Very few people actually use Aramaic. I think the Aramaic Gospel of Mark used by the Nazarenes may be the most accurate form of Aramaic remaining. The Sabians of Iraq may still use ancient Aramaic, but the language is near extinction and the Pe****ta of Syria is probably the closest to Aramaic that exists.

However because of the closeness of Aramaic to Hebrew and Arabic the writing rules should be the same.
 
Old 07-30-2011, 10:16 PM
 
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Quote:
but if you want to use the real names why not just post the religious threads all in hebrew
Read the TOS.
 
Old 07-30-2011, 11:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
Really.
Yes. Really.
Biblical Hebrew has no vowels. Hebrew/Edenic -the mother tongue which was confounded at Bab-el- never was written with vowels, in the beginning. There were no "vowel points" in ancient Hebrew, the mother tongue.
"Vowel points are a modern invention" -Isaac Mozeson
 
Old 07-31-2011, 12:58 AM
 
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Biblical Hebrew has no vowels.
And how do you think children learned to pronounce words correctly? Hebrew w/o vowels would be Yiddish. Children needed too learn at some point diacritics in order to know how to pronounce the word. One the word was learned they were no longer necessary. Thus you are confusing children text with adult text.
 
Old 07-31-2011, 11:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeilVA View Post
And how do you think children learned to pronounce words correctly? Hebrew w/o vowels would be Yiddish. Children needed too learn at some point diacritics in order to know how to pronounce the word. One the word was learned they were no longer necessary. Thus you are confusing children text with adult text.
The Bab-el rebellion brought the curse of the confounding of the one speech, and the confusion since then of that one mother tongue, which was written with no vowels or vowel points, for all spoke one speech/tongue, and read one word.
Hebrew -the mother tongue version of it- needed no vowel "points" until after the scattering of the peoples at the dispersion.

Read Isaac Mozeson's books "the Word" and "Origin of Speeches".

Language was spoken, before written, and early writing needed no vowels, because:
דבר אחד שפה אחד ארץ

"[all] earth [spoke] one speech [one spoken or written] word"
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