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Old 10-14-2011, 06:07 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
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How often do you think of your own death?

Only when I think it may be imminent... while in W. Africa, about four or five times a day.
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Old 10-14-2011, 06:16 PM
 
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If in everyday life, you are asked about continued existence after death by one of those people who would like to know everything but refuse to learn anything, the most appropriate and approximately correct answer is: ‘After your death you will be what you were before your birth.’ For this answer implies that it is preposterous to demand that a species of existence which had a beginning should not have an end; in addition, however, it contains a hint that there may be two kinds of existence and, correspondingly, two kinds of nothingness.
-Arthur Schopenhauer
Nihilism

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Old 10-14-2011, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Out West
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
After a traumatic experience I find myself thinking about it alot more than I used to. My ponderings and questionings related to philosophy, religion and life in general often lead to me dwelling, usually negatively, about death. The shortness of life, the inevitability of my extinction, my fate after death, those sort of things. Prior to this, I would have periods where I'd think of it a bit too much, but usually it was kept in the back of my mind. It resurfaces when someone close to me dies or when I hear about death in the news. Visiting cemeteries also causes one to reflect on death and consequently on life too. Being anxious can be a stressful experience because you are painfully aware of how delicate the mortal coil is: in other words, how easy it is to cross over from life to death. One wrong turn on the road, one slip in the shower, choking on food or something...in a highly anxious state one sees threats everywhere! It's a rather horrible way to live, but anyway, getting off topic a bit lol.

Also does it usually bring you positive or negative thoughts? I can imagine only someone with strong religious convictions would be overjoyed by the thought, while an atheist might be neutral about it at best.
I distinctly remember as a kid, lying awake in bed at night thinking that when I died, that was it, the world was going to go on without me and totally forget about me. It would scare me and make me cry. Funny thing is, I had to go to church. I didn't realize until much later that when I was a kid, even though I went to church, I guess I didn't have much faith in what I was hearing. (Episcopalian, which is Catholic Light...half the guilt.)

As I got older, I gained a different opinion but I still struggle with what is true...which we will never know no matter how much the atheists try to convince us that there is nothing and no matter how much Christians and other religions try to convince us there is something.

We don't know! I don't know! We will never know for sure until we die.

So, I think about it all the time. Heck, I think about it every time I walk down the stairs in my house.

"Boy, I really hope I don't fall down these stairs...that would really suck...I'd probably break my neck or die from shock because I wouldn't be able to move and call someone or get the neighbors to come over and help. I wonder how long I'd lie there till someone noticed I was dead...."

or

when I drove an airboat:

"Ok, if there really is a God, please, please, please, please, please, please, please do not let the lightning strike us. Please let us just get through this tour and not be struck by lightning either directly or indirectly..."

(I'm not even joking on that one. They made us drive giant metal boats on the fricken water when there was lightning. The only time they would stop is when the lightning was right on top of us...a mile away? Keep giving tours. Struck a tree in the park? Ok, we'll stop for a few minutes. And yes I did, every single time I had to go out during a storm, say those exact words over and over and over and over until we got back to the dock and unloaded and I was inside. Every. Time.)

I think about it when I'm driving.

"God I hope everyone drives decently today and doesn't plow in to me. I sure hope a moose doesn't walk out in front of me...I'm pretty much done if that happens."

In May, at my job I was just talking about when I lived in Miami, all of us at work witnessed an accident, the entire thing, from the cars driving to the cars hitting, flipping down the road and finally coming to a stop. One girl died because she was hit, directly, took the full force of the SUV that her car had cut in front of. (She was a passenger.)

Death was on my mind constantly for months after that. It never stopped. I moved shortly after that, 1700 miles away and I never stopped thinking about that girl, what she looked like, thinking how mere seconds before she died she had no idea she was about to die, and how I hoped I would make it and not die, too.

All. The. Time. I think about it.
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Old 10-14-2011, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxcar Overkill View Post
This is the most depressing thread in the history of City-Data.
Yes, but it has the potential to be uplifting. Any meditation on the inevitability of death is also a meditation on the preciousness of life.
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Old 10-14-2011, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Theophane View Post
Yes, but it has the potential to be uplifting. Any meditation on the inevitability of death is also a meditation on the preciousness of life.
True, and the fact that there is no afterlife makes this life all the more precious.
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Old 10-14-2011, 08:40 PM
 
Location: OKC
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I don't mind death so much as growing old and dying from old age.

Some biogerontologist believe that people under the age 50 today may be able to live to be 1000 years old, unless they get hit by a car or something. Further, they think they will be able to reverse, or cure, the process of aging.

Increasing advances in tissue repair and other basic medical research may eventually lead to a point where we reach the actuarial escape velocity of life extension. The "actuarial escape velocity of life extension" is when 1 years worth of scientific research results in greater than 1 years extension in life spans. Thus for every year you are alive, average life extension is increased by more than a year. This leads to an indefinite life span.

But who knows. That may just help some people sleep better at night.
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Old 10-14-2011, 09:00 PM
 
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Quite often.

I think about it when making choices of all sorts. When I plan my diet. When I ponder whether to make a certain move in traffic. When I'm alone in the woods attempting to cross a stream without a bridge, or negotiate a precipitous route. Thoughts of death prompt me to keep informed on what to do to stay healthy. Thoughs of death led me to stop smoking.

I think of it when I plan what I want to do in life, for even ten lives would be nowhere near enough time for me to experience all the things I would like to experience.

I wonder how many more Presidents I will see hold office. I wonder at the things which will come, completely unexpected, as things in history sometimes do, in the time I have left.

I wonder what I will miss. Will I see all my grandchildren born? Will I see any of my great-grandchildren born? Will I see humans walk on Mars? (I'm optimistic) Might I see an unmanned interstellar probed launched at a reasonable speed, say 10% speed-of-light, to, say, Alpha Centauri? (very unlikely, it seems)

I wonder how foreseen will it be. A long, lingering illness, or so sudden I never know it is imminent? These questions serve a useful purpose by prompting me to do certain things, say certain things to those for whom I care, not because I can expect to regret not doing so but because I understand it will please some people that I did/said them when they reflect on my death.

Death is a curious thing, made especially so by the deeply-embedded biological drive within most species to avoid it. Thinking about it has all sorts of useful consequences.

I don't fear the nothingness of death, but I do lament the end of the myriad pleasures of experiencing life that it necessarily entails.
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Old 10-14-2011, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Ohio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miss Blue View Post
I don't fear the end at all..Just want to have all my ducks in a row, my bills paid and my house clean for the Irish wake

I think as we age we just accept the fact that one day we will die and there is nothing we can do to not die. So we enjoy each day, each of our loved ones, and we make lasting memories for them about us. If we are believers we may even welcome crossing from this life into another one.

I talk to my children and grandkids about death and about what I feel and believe about it because I want them to know that when I die that I was not afraid, that I believe in an afterlife and that part of me is with them always and now and then they will see my eyes, my smile, a certain posture or habit in each other and in themselves as they age..

I do hope above all that I will not be any burden to anyone with any illness or loss of mental function in the end. I have found that that is a big worry, fear with us seniors.
Good post Miss Blue!

Quote:
Originally Posted by northstar22 View Post
True, and the fact that there is no afterlife makes this life all the more precious.
Not to get into a thing here but Ithink the correct phrase would be "and since there is seemingly no afterlife" After all, we dont know, we are alive.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Three Wolves In Snow View Post
We don't know! I don't know! We will never know for sure until we die.
.
And possibly not even then. If there is no afterlife, and we all return to nothingness, we wont be able to reflect upon that fact.
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Old 10-14-2011, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Ohio
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I take what I said earlier back. I do wonder about my own death, I wonder how my death will affect others, and if their way of living will be affected by it. And if so, how? Will life go on just as it had when I was a part of it? I suppose it's a bit arrogant to think it wouldn't. I suppose it would, but in a way, I hope it doesn't. In wonder how I will die, and will I know that it's about to happen. Most of all, I ponder just how much more time I have left.

In a way, I welcome death { eventualy, not for a long time } because it is and will be a sweet release of sorts. Who, after all, would want to live forever in this world with its dirty deeds and sorted affairs? Not me, that's for sure, especialy if my extended life meant that I had to watch my loved ones die.

{ This is truly a depressing thread. However, it has produced a much deeper discussion than I origianly expected. }
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Old 10-14-2011, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Southern Minnesota
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I would honestly want to live on this earth forever. I don't believe in any sort of afterlife or god, and while I don't fear becoming nonexistent, I don't welcome it either. I want immortality. Maybe cryonics might be worth looking into.
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