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Old 10-25-2014, 11:32 AM
 
2,854 posts, read 1,478,024 times
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The serpent in the Garden was a Pink Headed Reed Snake.


and those weren't apples in the tree.
And it wasn't a tree.

The Garden of the Hesperides is Hera's orchard in the west, where either a single tree or a grove of immortality-giving golden (glittering/glowing) apples grew. The Hesperides were given the task of tending to the grove, but occasionally plucked from it themselves. Not trusting them, Hera also placed in the garden a never-sleeping, hundred-headed dragon named Ladon as an additional safeguard.

After Heracles completed his first ten Labours, Eurystheus gave him two more claiming that neither the Lernaean Hydra counted (because Iolaus helped Heracles) nor the Augean stables (either because he received payment for the job or because the rivers did the work).
The first of these two additional Labours was to steal the apples from the garden of the Hesperides

Medusa ("guardian, protectress") was a monster, a Gorgon, generally described as having the face of a hideous human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair.
Most sources describe her as the daughter of Phorcys and Ceto, though the author Hyginus (Fabulae, 151) interposes a generation and gives Medusa another chthonic pair as parents. (Typhon and Echidna).
Fulgentius gives four Hesperides, named: Aigle, Hesperie, Arethusa and Me-dusa.

Medusa was beheaded by the hero Perseus, who thereafter used her head as a weapon. The severed head or heads becoming Pegasus and Chrysaor



Typhon was known as the Father of all monsters; his wife Echidna was likewise the Mother of all monsters.
The inveterate enemy of the Olympian gods is described in detail by Hesiod as a vast grisly monster with a hundred serpent heads
Typhon fathered several children by his niece, Echidna, daughter of Phorcys and Ceto, including the multiheaded hounds Cerberus and Orthrus.

Ladon was the serpent-like dragon that twined and twisted around the tree in the Garden of the Hesperides and guarded the golden apples. He was overcome by Heracles. The following day, Jason and the Argonauts passed by on their chthonic return journey from Colchis and heard the lament of "shining" Aegle, one of the four Hesperides, and viewed the still-twitching Ladon
Ladon might be given multiple heads, a hundred in Aristophanes' The Frogs (a passing remark in line 475), which might speak with different voices.

ir-os = eros = eyes many
ir-on = orion = eyes great
ir-on-os = ouranos = eyes great many

cheir-on = chiron = hands great
cheir-on-os = chronos = hands great many

di-os = zeus = many heads (many enlighteners)
di-on = dione = great heads
di-on-os = dionysus = many great heads

Dios/Zeus - from root *dyeu- "to gleam, to shine; to enlighten;" also the root of words for "sky" and "day" (cf. diurnal).


God saith, `Let the earth yield tender grass, herb sowing seed, fruit-tree making fruit after its kind, on the earth:' and it is so.
And the earth bringeth forth tender grass, herb sowing seed after its kind, and tree making fruit after its kind; and God seeth that [it is] good;
and there is an evening, and there is a morning -- day third.


And God saith, `Let enlighteners be in the expanse of the heavens, to make a separation between the day and the night, then they have been for signs, and for seasons, and for days and years,
and they have been for enlighteners in the expanse of the heavens to enlighten the earth.
(In Norse mythology the expanse of heaven was made from the skull of the giant Ymir)


The Hekatonkheires, or Hecatoncheires or Hundred-Handers (singular: Hekatonkheir; "Hundred-Handed Ones"; LatinisedCentimani), were figures in an archaic stage of Greek mythology, three giants of incredible strength and ferocity that surpassed that of all the Titans, whom they helped overthrow. Their name derives from the Greekἑκaτόν (hekaton; "hundred") and χείρ (kheir; "hand"), "each of them having a hundred hands and fifty heads"

Argus Panoptes or Argos, guardian of the heifer-nymph Io and son of Arestor, was a primordial giant whose epithet "Panoptes", "all-seeing", led to his being described with multiple, often one hundred, eyes.

Last edited by granpa; 10-25-2014 at 12:01 PM..
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Old 10-25-2014, 11:33 AM
 
2,854 posts, read 1,478,024 times
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The island of Atlantis floating like an ark upon the waters of Khaos.
And the Erythraean Sea (the Lake of fire) which lies beyond the Pillars of Heracles (the rainbow "Bifrost")
where the ancient Vanir reside in the island of Vindblain (Wind-blown)
beyond the perpetual wind of Andlang (Wind-long)

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Old 10-25-2014, 01:55 PM
 
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Fulgentius gives four Hesperides, named: Aegle, Hesperie, Medusa and Arethusa

medusa of the golden apples turned people to stone and midas turned everything to gold

Last edited by granpa; 10-25-2014 at 02:36 PM..
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Old 10-25-2014, 02:41 PM
Status: "Mostly gruntled." (set 14 days ago)
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
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I don't understand what you're doing granpa, but I admire the dedication and attention to detail you bring to the task.
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Old 10-25-2014, 03:29 PM
 
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And the woman saith unto the serpent, `Of the fruit of the trees of the garden we do eat,
But of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the garden, God hath said, "Ye shall eat of it not, ye shall die"
And the serpent saith unto the woman, "Ye shall eat of it, not ye shall die"


And Jehovah God saith to the woman, `What [is] this thou hast done?' and the woman saith, `The (sneaky) snake snaked me -- and I did eat
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Old 10-25-2014, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
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Is the moral of the story not to eat oranges?
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Old 10-26-2014, 08:29 AM
 
Location: US
27,190 posts, read 14,532,800 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by granpa View Post
The island of Atlantis floating like an ark upon the waters of Khaos.
And the Erythraean Sea (the Lake of fire) which lies beyond the Pillars of Heracles (the rainbow "Bifrost")
where the ancient Vanir reside in the island of Vindblain (Wind-blown)
beyond the perpetual wind of Andlang (Wind-long)
That looks like Norse Mythology...
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Old 03-05-2019, 09:56 PM
 
9,713 posts, read 12,349,551 times
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The serpent tempts man to think that he can figure it out on his OWN. Without the help of his fellow humanity. No one who is living in the midst of other people should ever try to go it alone.

Eve should have trusted what Adam told her, and not questioned it. Why? Because he was her husband and loved her. We have to put our trust in our loved ones, and have faith that they want what is best for us.
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Old 03-05-2019, 10:31 PM
 
Location: minnesota
6,035 posts, read 1,935,066 times
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Originally Posted by TroutDude View Post
I don't understand what you're doing granpa, but I admire the dedication and attention to detail you bring to the task.
At least it wasn't the dreaded cottonmouth snake this time. Poor Hannie's uncle Willie.
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Old 03-06-2019, 08:10 AM
 
8,674 posts, read 2,160,591 times
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I do not believe it was a snake, I think it was something different, reptilian, probably closer to looking like a small dinosaur, it may have been bipedal as well.
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