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Old 12-30-2017, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
15,990 posts, read 7,562,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
I donít think this is limited to American Christians. I think that it is a common experience for all of humanity.
Yes, but at least among Thai Buddhists I hear more admissions that they grew up in a Buddhist environment, and it seems like I hear more American Christians inappropriately say they chose their religion. Just my feeling.
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Old 12-30-2017, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Northeastern US
14,026 posts, read 8,057,935 times
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My family converted to Christian fundamentalism when I was five, so in effect it is just all I ever knew. I did consciously buy into it, as they encourage a discreet conversion "experience" and I clearly remember assenting to it and understanding it. Although I was not quite six at the time, I was very "into" it and ended up attending a church-approved bible institute for a year after high school, and was a very active layperson.

I deconverted in my 30s (I'm now 60) and have identified as atheist for the past 15 or so years. Before that I was best classified as a non-practicing fundamentalist I suppose. The proximal cause was cognitive dissonance between what my religious faith told me about my reality, and how I experienced it. Once I had some distance from the faith I came to better understand how religious faith exerts its influence, how it fails to meet is reasonable burden of proof, and what ways of engaging with reality are more effective and functional.
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Old 12-30-2017, 02:29 PM
 
Location: NSW
2,374 posts, read 1,553,302 times
Reputation: 815
Raised Catholic, born and bred into a traditional Catholic home.
Have had some brief flings in other churches, went to a Pentecostal church for a while after an Orthodox friend converted and became entrenched in it in his early 20s (baptized in the Spirit, healings and all that showy off stuff), and even went to the ICoC for a little while during my student days.
Came home to the Catholic church very quickly though, as the others- particularly Pentecostal, were just way too over the top to stay there.
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Old 12-30-2017, 02:32 PM
 
31,576 posts, read 7,283,106 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BaptistFundie View Post
God chose me. I didn't choose him. I was raised Catholic, but stopped attending as a teen. God saved me when I was 20 years old. I've bounced around to a few different denominations and churches, but I'm currently in a Baptist church because the pastor preaches the Bible, and I click well with the people. It's my church home.
Talk about read between the lines. after being spoonfed a church he 'bounced around' until he found one that suited him. Then God "Chose him". Sometimes you don't need to attach a label saying Bullcrap in order to recognize it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclist1968 View Post
you dont chose a religion but an authority which you deem as truth

then whatever truth coincides with that is what you choose
It's what I did Decided what sort of religion I liked and then looked around for one that was as close as possible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zthatzmanz28 View Post
It just developed as my understanding and knowledge increased. Then one day I realized I was not alone and I knew I was an ATHEIST who believes in GOD..
And we don't have too many of those on our books..
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Old 12-30-2017, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
6,845 posts, read 6,852,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Yes, but at least among Thai Buddhists I hear more admissions that they grew up in a Buddhist environment, and it seems like I hear more American Christians inappropriately say they chose their religion. Just my feeling.
I see what you are saying.

I think that may gave something to do with the concept of being “born again”. To outsiders, responding to an altar call, making a conscious decision to undergo adult baptism, or simply making a decision to revitalize one’s commitment to their faith is simply a progression. American Christians mythologize it as a quantum leap to a heretofore unexperienced level.

You and I know it isn’t so much a revolutionary choice as much as it is the culmination of years of training and preparation, but that view doesn’t work for the Christian marketing program.
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Old 12-30-2017, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Northern California
436 posts, read 143,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
The problem with much of this thread is that most American Christians don't choose their religion. They take whatever their family raised them to be within a Christian majority. Oh, they might stray to a slightly different denomination. But they don't really choose their religion. They follow their status quo.
Christian choose the truth of scripture, whether that coincides with their parents beliefs or not.
It's just what Christians do

Those who do not, well that doesn't make a Christian.

Most people who call themselves Christians are not Christians. Just as most in scripture who called themselves men of god, were not.

As in scripture, there are very few Christians
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Old 12-30-2017, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
15,990 posts, read 7,562,140 times
Reputation: 15868
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishbrains View Post
I see what you are saying.

I think that may gave something to do with the concept of being ďborn againĒ. To outsiders, responding to an altar call, making a conscious decision to undergo adult baptism, or simply making a decision to revitalize oneís commitment to their faith is simply a progression. American Christians mythologize it as a quantum leap to a heretofore unexperienced level.

You and I know it isnít so much a revolutionary choice as much as it is the culmination of years of training and preparation, but that view doesnít work for the Christian marketing program.
Agreed.
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Old 12-30-2017, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Northern California
436 posts, read 143,157 times
Reputation: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by mordant View Post
My family converted to Christian fundamentalism when I was five, so in effect it is just all I ever knew. I did consciously buy into it, as they encourage a discreet conversion "experience" and I clearly remember assenting to it and understanding it. Although I was not quite six at the time, I was very "into" it and ended up attending a church-approved bible institute for a year after high school, and was a very active layperson.

I deconverted in my 30s (I'm now 60) and have identified as atheist for the past 15 or so years. Before that I was best classified as a non-practicing fundamentalist I suppose. The proximal cause was cognitive dissonance between what my religious faith told me about my reality, and how I experienced it. Once I had some distance from the faith I came to better understand how religious faith exerts its influence, how it fails to meet is reasonable burden of proof, and what ways of engaging with reality are more effective and functional.
There is no such thing as Christian Fundamentalism

There are only Christians or "disciples of Christ"

Again, most people who claim to be Christians are not.

Just food for thought....
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Old 12-30-2017, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
6,845 posts, read 6,852,454 times
Reputation: 11583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclist1968 View Post
There is no such thing as Christian Fundamentalism

There are only Christians or "disciples of Christ"

Again, most people who claim to be Christians are not.

Just food for thought....
If a person identifies as a Christian, I believe them and accept their claim. It is not for me to decide whether they conform to some standard, when Christians cannot even agree on what that standard may be.

Roughly 70% of Americans say that they are Christians, and I will believe all 220,000,000 of them.
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Old 12-30-2017, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Northeastern US
14,026 posts, read 8,057,935 times
Reputation: 5959
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclist1968 View Post
There is no such thing as Christian Fundamentalism

There are only Christians or "disciples of Christ"

Again, most people who claim to be Christians are not.

Just food for thought....
Funny considering that I was part of that movement, self-labeled as such, for some thirty years.

My denomination was IFCA, Independent Fundamental Churches of America.

I understand what you're asserting of course, that there are "real Christians"(tm) and cultural Christians.

Ironically, that is also the claim of Christian fundamentalists.

Every individual is a member of a group that is the only right one, whether that group is official or exists only between the ears of the asserter or anything in between.

Just food for thought ....
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