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Old 02-13-2019, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Southwestern, USA
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I believe we are all gods, does that count?
But, not the One Father Creator God, Brahma...said that to freak
Christians out!
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Old 02-13-2019, 10:19 AM
Status: "Freedom - Diversity - Unity" (set 12 days ago)
 
Location: Mars City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tzaphkiel View Post
Paganism, Animism and Buddhism
Have elements of polytheism, with many deities
Buddhism is neither polytheistic nor theistic. It worships no deity. It follows the ways and teachings of the mortal Buddha, and is mostly philosophical.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nirvana07 View Post
Hinduism is polytheistic.
Hinduism is monotheistic. The one God (Brahma) is represented in numerous forms, in a similar way as the Christian God is represented by three (Father, Son, Holy Spirit). A big difference with them is reincarnation and continued existence, as opposed to one death and one afterlife.

Last edited by Thoreau424; 02-13-2019 at 10:28 AM..
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Old 02-13-2019, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
21,487 posts, read 10,045,447 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
Buddhism is neither polytheistic nor theistic. It worships no deity. It follows the ways and teachings of the mortal Buddha, and is mostly philosophical.


Hinduism is monotheistic. The one God (Brahma) is represented in numerous forms, in a similar way as the Christian God is represented by three (Father, Son, Holy Spirit). A big difference with them is reincarnation and continued existence, as opposed to one death and one afterlife.
Yes, you're correct about Buddhism, although what seeps into it is what I refer to as "cultural Buddhism".
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Old 02-15-2019, 12:25 PM
 
10,359 posts, read 15,188,864 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thoreau424 View Post
B


Hinduism is monotheistic
. The one God (Brahma) is represented in numerous forms, in a similar way as the Christian God is represented by three (Father, Son, Holy Spirit). A big difference with them is reincarnation and continued existence, as opposed to one death and one afterlife.



Millions, one or one-ness

Thirty-three divinities are mentioned in other ancient texts, such as the Yajurveda,[114] however, there is no fixed "number of deities" in Hinduism any more than a standard representation of "deity".[115] There is, however, a popular perception stating that there are 33 million deities in Hinduism.[116] Most, by far, are goddesses, state Foulston and Abbott, suggesting "how important and popular goddesses are" in Hindu culture.[115] No one has a list of the 33 category goddesses and gods, but scholars state all deities are typically viewed in Hinduism as "emanations or manifestation of genderless principle called Brahman, representing the many facets of Ultimate Reality".[115][116][117]
This concept of Brahman is not the same as the monotheistic separate God found in Abrahamic religions, where God is considered, states Brodd, as "creator of the world, above and independent of human existence", while in Hinduism "God, the universe, human beings and all else is essentially one thing" and everything is connected oneness, the same god is in every human being as Atman, the eternal Sel

In Hinduism, any thing a person chooses to worship is representational of one-god. Hence, a person may travel along a path in a jungle, feel urge to pray and pray to any object it lays its mind on. Even a spec of dust at his feet. Then, that spec of dust is God embodied in it. As everything is God.



hence, in a sense, Hinduism is a polytheistic religion, as polytheistic as people make it. yet, it is monotheistic too, as Brahma is one and all.
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Old 02-15-2019, 12:30 PM
 
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Buddha is not mortal. Buddha is not a person. Buddha is degree of progression. Buddha you referring to possibly achieved 360 degree of progression, becoming perfect. Yet, same time, spirit in the Gautam Siddhartha body, also known as Sukyamuni Buddha, was and stayed immortal.

Saying "mortal Buddha" is contradictory. It is saying "mortal immortal".
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Old 02-15-2019, 02:05 PM
 
12,628 posts, read 4,777,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukrkoz View Post
Millions, one or one-ness

Thirty-three divinities are mentioned in other ancient texts, such as the Yajurveda,[114] however, there is no fixed "number of deities" in Hinduism any more than a standard representation of "deity".[115] There is, however, a popular perception stating that there are 33 million deities in Hinduism.[116] Most, by far, are goddesses, state Foulston and Abbott, suggesting "how important and popular goddesses are" in Hindu culture.[115] No one has a list of the 33 category goddesses and gods, but scholars state all deities are typically viewed in Hinduism as "emanations or manifestation of genderless principle called Brahman, representing the many facets of Ultimate Reality".[115][116][117]
This concept of Brahman is not the same as the monotheistic separate God found in Abrahamic religions, where God is considered, states Brodd, as "creator of the world, above and independent of human existence", while in Hinduism "God, the universe, human beings and all else is essentially one thing" and everything is connected oneness, the same god is in every human being as Atman, the eternal Sel

In Hinduism, any thing a person chooses to worship is representational of one-god. Hence, a person may travel along a path in a jungle, feel urge to pray and pray to any object it lays its mind on. Even a spec of dust at his feet. Then, that spec of dust is God embodied in it. As everything is God.



hence, in a sense, Hinduism is a polytheistic religion, as polytheistic as people make it. yet, it is monotheistic too, as Brahma is one and all.
in sense it is polytheist. Just like a blind person holding a tail and another petting the head, can seem to be describing two different beasts.

i am no buddhist, infact, other than the non preachy part, I think its as silly as christian. But he did have a good saying, "if you see me after I die ... kill me."
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Old 02-15-2019, 04:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoCardinals View Post
Obviously you are free to believe what sits well with your logic.

In my opinion, the very first condition for an entity to become God is that it MUST be ONE.
The second condition is that it must not be dependent on anyone or anything.

Both these conditions take Shinto or whatever ism is it, out of question.

Talking from a logical stand point - if there is more than one God then a conflict in between them is inevitable.

For example. God A wants to do a certain thing by a certain way but God B has different ideas.

If both are Gods then both have unlimited power - who will have his say?

If God A is more powerful than God B, then God B is not a God because there is someone more powerful than him.

If God A and God B are equally powerful (both have unlimited power) and they never get into any conflict then why do we need two or three or four of them?

One God with unlimited power can do the same that trillions of Gods with unlimited power could do together.


And now the wife god wants to have a lot of kids but the Husband God doesn’t want it - what you gonna do about that now?
If a God is not only all powerful but also all knowing and all caring that should it be logical for the God's to not be in conflict? What would you call Thor if not a god even though Odin is more powerful. Why not a separate god for finding last keys so the main god can create hurricanes and droughts.

The thing is to my mind it is just as illogical to have one God as for you having many Gods.
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Old 02-15-2019, 11:21 PM
 
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We humans are strange creatures. We create many versions of God with all manner of ridiculous and absurd attributes and stories and then some of us pretend that by refuting those versions and stories we refute the existence of God. It is beyond silly. God may be many things but it is unlikely that we know anything about them so it is preposterous to proclaim what God MUST be to qualify as God. At a bare minimum God simply needs to be responsible for our existence and the existence of everything else. Any other attributes would be superfluous.
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Old 02-16-2019, 01:05 AM
 
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I used to work with a guy that was pretty average on the surface, he did 20 years in the Army and retired out, he was married, had a couple kids, was super intelligent...but one day when we got to talking about our beliefs and religion, he told me he believed in the old Greek Gods, like Zeus, Mt Olympus, etc.



I thought he was joking at first, but as we talked more about it, this is what he truly believed in, apparently he had these beliefs from his teenage years, he said they seemed the most logical to him. I cannot remember if he said anything about worshiping these gods though, i think we did get into that, but its been a few years.


He is the only person I have ever met that truly had these beliefs.
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Old 02-16-2019, 04:26 AM
 
Location: US
27,429 posts, read 14,790,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukrkoz View Post
Buddha is not mortal. Buddha is not a person. Buddha is degree of progression. Buddha you referring to possibly achieved 360 degree of progression, becoming perfect. Yet, same time, spirit in the Gautam Siddhartha body, also known as Sukyamuni Buddha, was and stayed immortal.

Saying "mortal Buddha" is contradictory. It is saying "mortal immortal".
Oxymoron?...
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