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Old 04-29-2019, 04:35 PM
 
8,527 posts, read 4,995,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuminousTruth View Post
If it's membership then the only damage is caused by retaining the non-payers as members when they haven't paid, and thus all damages would be the fault of the Church for not kicking them out appropriately/legally. Thus the false church could not sue.
Sorry, I don't agree with your reasoning. Gyms are able to sue members who do not pay their dues as agreed; ditto for country clubs.

I myself would not sign an agreement to pay $X in the hope that the contract would not hold up in court. Just don't sign; problem solved.
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Old 04-29-2019, 04:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by remsleep View Post
Anyone can sue, but they would never win and would most likely get laughed out of court. To have a valid contract, you must have consideration from both parties. What are they offering you for 10% of your income, nothing but an empty promise of a future ticket to paradise. You can't enforce a contract like that.
We don't know how it is worded, so we don't know that there is no consideration.
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:17 PM
 
Location: City-Data Forum
7,956 posts, read 4,687,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuminousTruth View Post
If it's membership then the only damage is caused by retaining the non-payers as members when they haven't paid, and thus all damages would be the fault of the Church for not kicking them out appropriately/legally. Thus the false church could not sue.
correction: I meant to end with the implication "cannot sue with any chance of winning, currently."
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:22 PM
 
Location: City-Data Forum
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
Sorry, I don't agree with your reasoning. Gyms are able to sue members who do not pay their dues as agreed; ditto for country clubs.

I myself would not sign an agreement to pay $X in the hope that the contract would not hold up in court. Just don't sign; problem solved.
I've never heard of this, what States would allow such a thing. It should be the responsibility of the gyms to not allow the nonmembers and no-longer members in.

Perhaps you mean that those particular Gyms or Country clubs sued (with a presidented cause) ex-members that continued to sneak in after being informed they were no longer welcome.

Most certainly, you should discuss with good lawyers before signing any contracts.
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Madison, Alabama
3,327 posts, read 1,567,591 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Morpheuss View Post
A church that I've been attending makes people sign paperwork that describes their members are expected to pay 10% of their income as tithe.

So if a member pays tithe regularly but does not actually pay 10%. Can that church sue them for the unpaid tithe say a year later? This question started dancing around my head as I observed that new members were being made to sign paperwork.
I'd find another church. No way would I sign something like that.
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Old 04-29-2019, 06:27 PM
 
Location: City-Data Forum
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Originally Posted by RocketDawg View Post
I'd find another church. No way would I sign something like that.
Inform the proper congressional representatives as well. This is ridiculous, even for a gym or country club.
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Old 04-30-2019, 01:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuminousTruth View Post
I've never heard of this, what States would allow such a thing. It should be the responsibility of the gyms to not allow the nonmembers and no-longer members in.

Perhaps you mean that those particular Gyms or Country clubs sued (with a presidented cause) ex-members that continued to sneak in after being informed they were no longer welcome.

Most certainly, you should discuss with good lawyers before signing any contracts.
No, I am saying that when you sign a membership contract and agree to pay $X, then you owe $X. The terms to exit the contract are generally stated in the contract. Perhaps you agree to membership for a specified period of time, perhaps you agree to a month to month membership which you can resign at any time with a 30 day written notice, perhaps you agree to something else. It makes no difference whether or not you use the gym/club, it only matters whether or not you follow the terms of the contract you signed.

Is this church basing their tithing contract on membership? I have no idea.
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Old 04-30-2019, 01:45 PM
 
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Do you have to bring your W-2's to church once a year and get your 10% sin tax/donations audited?

Make sure you're not acting "as created" and sinning?
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Old 04-30-2019, 07:28 PM
 
Location: City-Data Forum
7,956 posts, read 4,687,818 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
No, I am saying that when you sign a membership contract and agree to pay $X, then you owe $X. The terms to exit the contract are generally stated in the contract. Perhaps you agree to membership for a specified period of time, perhaps you agree to a month to month membership which you can resign at any time with a 30 day written notice, perhaps you agree to something else. It makes no difference whether or not you use the gym/club, it only matters whether or not you follow the terms of the contract you signed.

Is this church basing their tithing contract on membership? I have no idea.
Wow, I had no idea you could be held responsible for something you do not use in this supposedly "great" country of States. I mean, couldn't "energy bills" then be the same? I understand that phone bills can legally charge you, but the State also requires them to speedily terminate service if you do not pay. They cannot stack up your debt indefinitely, nor even for the "time term" of the (often 2 years) contracts.
They must turn off your phone service within a month or two, no?

Like I said, however, contracts can be illegal (have illegal terms) and thus be void.

Here is something I found about gym contracts. https://www.thrillist.com/culture/ho...aking-contract
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Old 05-01-2019, 09:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by remsleep View Post
I would love to get sued by a church. Discovery would be fun, the church would be forced to provide evidence of all their claims, claims that enticed the plaintiff to enter into the contract. Faith and the typical deflections won't cut it in court. Since they can't prove even the basic tenets of their religion are true, they would be exposing themselves to significant legal exposure.


Proving fraud in the inducement would be a walk in the park.


https://dictionary.law.com/Default.aspx?selected=786


fraud in the inducement

n. the use of deceit or trick to cause someone to act to his/her disadvantage, such as signing an agreement or deeding away real property. The heart of this type of fraud is misleading the other party as to the facts upon which he/she will base his/her decision to act.

Using the promise of eternal rewards that you can't guarantee exist or will be provided to entice people to enter into an agreement to give you 10% of their income is a pretty clear cut case of fraud.

You're assuming the signed document promises eternal rewards. Maybe it does, but again, we don't know what the document actually says.
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