U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Religion and Spirituality
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-02-2009, 07:35 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
7,088 posts, read 12,719,167 times
Reputation: 3975

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
North Carolinians seem to be realists, jmo. Those of my acquaintance at least.

Wondering what the Higher Power thinks of what goes on --absolutely ridiculous is about all I can conclude.

Glad to be within driving distance of the mountains of NC. Majestic.
Thankfully I live amid and among some very intelligent people, the area of this state between Raleigh, Durham, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem is home to no fewer than 9 Universities and a score or so of colleges (not counting the community colleges) this would be a circle of less than 100 miles diameter. I graduated from one of these universities, but, a large portion of the state is still into fundamentalist religions, not so much in this area, but, for the rest of the state (a few pockets of education also exist, but, in large) the baptists have a strangle hold and are attempting to fight evolution tooth and nail. When gazing upon a number of these followers, it seems that homo erectus is not yet extinct.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-02-2009, 09:19 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,411,002 times
Reputation: 2280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusty Rhodes View Post
Thankfully I live amid and among some very intelligent people, the area of this state between Raleigh, Durham, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem is home to no fewer than 9 Universities and a score or so of colleges (not counting the community colleges) this would be a circle of less than 100 miles diameter. I graduated from one of these universities, but, a large portion of the state is still into fundamentalist religions, not so much in this area, but, for the rest of the state (a few pockets of education also exist, but, in large) the baptists have a strangle hold and are attempting to fight evolution tooth and nail. When gazing upon a number of these followers, it seems that homo erectus is not yet extinct.
mmmhmmm

I have a friend in Toccoa, GA and I know what you mean.

Waving madly toward you.

I'm near Emory in Atlanta and that seems to have a benign effect. Actually I should mention a few others but you know them I'm certain.

You can analyze statistical data until your eyes bleed and still not get the whole story. jmo.~~
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2009, 12:31 AM
 
11,145 posts, read 13,551,736 times
Reputation: 4209
Quote:
I will have to say that this post comes from another forum. I did not move it over because it was appropriate for that particular site, but I was intrigued. What do you think accounts for the fact that the New England states (bastions of Salem, no less) are the least religious? Are they less demographically diverse ? They are the thinnest also if that means anything.
New England states are far more demographically diverse, not less - that's why they're less religious - as well as the whole Northeast corridor from DC on up to Boston.

Education levels are much higher, especially in the cities where most of the populations are, which develops critical thinking and reduces adherence to any one belief structure. It's not necessarily due just to the local populations, but a lot of highly educated people move to the Northeast cities from the Midwest and South, so that worldview concentrates and exacerbates itself.

I remember my friends being shocked at seeing a real live street corner preacher seething with anger and venom and condemning everybody to a warm vacation home down south (great line - had to steal it).

People in urban areas also constantly interact with people from vastly different backgrounds, making it nearly impossible to claim to have the one true path. I've lived in rural areas and can totally see how people can get lulled into never questioning their beliefs because everyone around them shares the beliefs.

As for New England in general, it has a lot more in common culturally with Europe. Europeans got rid of religion for the most part as they advanced economically and socially.

I think where you find it different from Europe is that most people still believe in a higher power - be it a God or a Force - and have spiritual paths that meld aspects of many traditions, making adherence to one church kind of impractical.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2009, 08:55 AM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,411,002 times
Reputation: 2280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefly View Post
As for New England in general, it has a lot more in common culturally with Europe. Europeans got rid of religion for the most part as they advanced economically and socially.

I think where you find it different from Europe is that most people still believe in a higher power - be it a God or a Force - and have spiritual paths that meld aspects of many traditions, making adherence to one church kind of impractical.

mmmmhmmmm--'The Founders' and what they said. 'One Nation Under God'---

Some were Masons-- and they intended a broad definition of God. Glad they did, glad they did.

LOL--I believe the people of Maine have a sufficient amount of religion. Less than Vermont, if the truth were known--but perhaps more people in Vermont chose to respond and the few who responded in Maine--had 'a lot'???

LOL--Lobster fisherman don't strike me as the sort to participate in surveys.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2009, 09:58 AM
 
11,145 posts, read 13,551,736 times
Reputation: 4209
Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
mmmmhmmmm--'The Founders' and what they said. 'One Nation Under God'---

Some were Masons-- and they intended a broad definition of God. Glad they did, glad they did.

LOL--I believe the people of Maine have a sufficient amount of religion. Less than Vermont, if the truth were known--but perhaps more people in Vermont chose to respond and the few who responded in Maine--had 'a lot'???

LOL--Lobster fisherman don't strike me as the sort to participate in surveys.
The phrase "one nation under God" was added to the Pledge of Allegiance in 1954 during an exceedingly conservative era.

I was talking about the Northeast today - not 300 years ago. Anyway, many founders were Deists, some were Christians, but they were quite clear about keeping any one religion out of control. So, I'm not sure what you're implying.

"Christianity neither is, nor ever was, a part of the common law." - Thomas Jefferson
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2009, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,126 posts, read 25,840,061 times
Reputation: 16226
Quote:
Originally Posted by TakeAhike View Post
Interesting. I suppose the agricultural area is around Sacramento and possibly Napa.

How I would love to visit CA again and tour it more fully. I know those that are transplanted to Atlanta miss it badly, particularly the coast--the Atlantic will never be the Pacific. Beautiful state.

Well, the last I checked (2002 stats, I think) California produces a little over 1/10th of the entire nations agriculture. People tend to shove California into the 'LA and San Francisco' stereotype when most of Ca is more like Texas than anything. You mentioned Napa, which is 'famous' for wine, with California producing nearly 90% of the nations wine(wineinstitute.org).

It's pretty crazy, really. Many people who live in California don't even know what an agricultural backround this state has. I don't know if that has a direct corrolation with 'religion', but from what I've experienced in the ag industry (I was involved with dairy animals for many years) the 'country folk' are very religious and not too happy with any type of progression socially.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2009, 03:19 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,411,002 times
Reputation: 2280
Quote:
Originally Posted by JetJockey View Post
Well, the last I checked (2002 stats, I think) California produces a little over 1/10th of the entire nations agriculture. People tend to shove California into the 'LA and San Francisco' stereotype when most of Ca is more like Texas than anything. You mentioned Napa, which is 'famous' for wine, with California producing nearly 90% of the nations wine(wineinstitute.org).

It's pretty crazy, really. Many people who live in California don't even know what an agricultural backround this state has. I don't know if that has a direct corrolation with 'religion', but from what I've experienced in the ag industry (I was involved with dairy animals for many years) the 'country folk' are very religious and not too happy with any type of progression socially.
Broccoli or spinach--last year CA made news over that and a few years ago 'mad cow disease' in CA was a hot topic all the way over here in GA. We stay pretty frantic at times ourselves--transitioning from an agricultural background to 'something else'.

My granddaddy was a farmer and yes, he would drive his wagon to church most Sundays but stayed too busy and tired to delve deeply into religion. If you run a farm you know God pretty well but have to keep working. Thankful that there are those who can/will do that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2009, 03:22 PM
 
8,862 posts, read 14,411,002 times
Reputation: 2280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefly View Post
The phrase "one nation under God" was added to the Pledge of Allegiance in 1954 during an exceedingly conservative era.

I was talking about the Northeast today - not 300 years ago. Anyway, many founders were Deists, some were Christians, but they were quite clear about keeping any one religion out of control. So, I'm not sure what you're implying.

"Christianity neither is, nor ever was, a part of the common law." - Thomas Jefferson
You explained my intent coherently. Jefferson was also quite clear about religious beliefs being a private matter--I could not agree more fully. Made some revisions to his own Bible and all that. It has been too long since I reviewed US history. Thanks for the clarification.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2009, 09:21 PM
 
1 posts, read 659 times
Reputation: 10
Actually, Orange County is not that religious. Some megachurches but church attend for the white population is below the national average according to pew relgious studies. Relgious people are in Kern, Frenso, and the inland counties.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Religion and Spirituality
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top