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Old 04-11-2013, 07:23 PM
 
1,058 posts, read 1,782,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Indyking View Post
Seems like the answer is more likely "good for NV standards". I was told Coral Charter has a perception of being good but they are no more successful in getting kids to college than the "good" standard public schools I mentioned in the previous post, plus, like you said, there is the issue of the lack of other offerings. A Good School has a different definition depending on individual priorities, but for me, success rate to college enrollment is critical.
The schools you mentioned in your previous post are the creme del a creme of the WCSD. Coral has the benefit of serving the kids not fortunate enough to live within the boundaries of these top rated schools.

My daughter went to Coral for 4th to 7th grade and then we moved to Texas - College was a big deal for the school but when you only have 10-15 Sr's the stats can be quickly skewed. My DD came out of 7th grade way ahead of the curve of even the good Texas school we put her into. We are now enrolling her into an IB program for high school. If we had stayed in NV she would have either stayed at Coral or gone over to Wooster to the IB program. Coral tends to keep only the true academic kids into their high school years mainly due to lack of athletics.

The question I asked a lot when my DS was in high school was what was the percentage of kids in the AP programs who actually scored a 3 or better on the national exams. At the time the results were dismal district wide, somewhere in the 15-20% range for the entire district. My DS's high school only had about a 5% pass with a 3 or better.

The other thing to look at is, in all honesty, UNR is fairly easy to get into, I would be more interested in seeing how NV graduates do at acceptance to some of the more competitive schools on the west coast. The Pac Ten etc.
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Old 04-11-2013, 09:26 PM
 
979 posts, read 1,343,912 times
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NV kids do very poorly when attending college. The kids my daughter knew who went to UNR have all either dropped out or rarely graduate. A few, very few, have gone on to schools out of state (fairly rigorous universities) and struggled even though these are kids who had tons of AP classes (with good test scores, mostly at Reno HS) and a lot of them were in the gifted programs. The problem seems to be that NV schools don't give bright kids much competition, so they fail to learn how to really work for the grades. They go off to college with less than adequate study skills, thinking everything is going to be like NV.

We ended up pulling our daughter out of a good Galena-area grade school after 3rd grade. They take the Iowa (national) tests at the end of 3rd grade and our daughter had 0's in many sections of the math area on the test. I went to the principal (this administrator had previously been the head of the gifted program and somewhat mentored our daughter in the early grade school years), asked her why a bright student should be lacking in math to the point of getting 0's???? The principal explained that my daughter had been in a difficult 3rd grade class and the teacher just didn't get to multiplication tables by the end of the year. So I went to my favorite 4th grade teacher and asked what her expectation was for multiplication in the fall. She said they need to know up to 12 x 12 by heart. Really? Then why isn't your colleague across the hall teaching it? The 4th grade teacher told me that she can always tell who the kids have had from k-3 because of where their "gaps" are. Some teachers stress reading by sight instead of phonetics, so when they are no longer teaching reading in 4th grade (it changes from "learning to read" to "reading to learn"), the kids who cannot sound out words they don't know fall off the radar from learning more advanced material if they are not adventurous or ask for help. She mentioned that some of the kids come in not knowing multiplication...can't move on to division so those kids have to back track for the first 6-10 weeks. Some teachers know that kids are sponges in the early grades and do lots of memorization work like states/capitals, US history dates, the Constitution, etc. At the end of 3rd grade they had not studied ANY history except the holiday stuff like pilgrims (with no real explanation) and there ha been no geography. Our daughter didn't have much of that and we realized every year was widening the gap. And she was a gifted student.

So we pulled her out, started with multiplication tables, moved on to states/capitals, did a geography program called Mapping the World in 180 Days (major rivers, mountains, countries), worked on spelling through Latin and Greek roots, studied Latin and French, required a report on a different president every week (also helped build up report-writing skills of which she had none...no sentence structure/parts of speech skills, no coherent paragraphs let alone a 5 paragraph paper)...this is what Washoe County schools lack. When we realized she was never going to get these things in school it just made sense to homeschool full time since we were going to have to teach it anyway.

For the most part we followed the Core Curriculum by a guy named Hirsch, The Well Trained Mind, and The Educated Child. We pulled lists of the 100 best books to read off websites, bought all the Caldecott and Newbery award books, traveled often to San Francisco museums, explored the outdoors...and I'm pretty sure she is a well-rounded, inquisitive, and productive university student. Although she is now 21 and just accepted to grad school (so some may say things in WCSD might have changed over the years), not so much. I hear the parents in my neighborhood complaining about the same things we did, and now have the extra burden of constant budget cuts due to a bad economy. Much of the WCSD woes are due to their funding matrix...property taxes and sales tax...both go down in a bad economy.

I wish anyone with kids in the district the very best of luck. But looking towards fledging my nestling this summer into the real adult world, I can only encourage parents to really work with their kids on the foundation skills because they are not going to get them in school.
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Old 04-12-2013, 06:44 AM
 
1,058 posts, read 1,782,998 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by utsci View Post
NV kids do very poorly when attending college. The kids my daughter knew who went to UNR have all either dropped out or rarely graduate. A few, very few, have gone on to schools out of state (fairly rigorous universities) and struggled even though these are kids who had tons of AP classes (with good test scores, mostly at Reno HS) and a lot of them were in the gifted programs. The problem seems to be that NV schools don't give bright kids much competition, so they fail to learn how to really work for the grades. They go off to college with less than adequate study skills, thinking everything is going to be like NV.

We ended up pulling our daughter out of a good Galena-area grade school after 3rd grade. They take the Iowa (national) tests at the end of 3rd grade and our daughter had 0's in many sections of the math area on the test. I went to the principal (this administrator had previously been the head of the gifted program and somewhat mentored our daughter in the early grade school years), asked her why a bright student should be lacking in math to the point of getting 0's???? The principal explained that my daughter had been in a difficult 3rd grade class and the teacher just didn't get to multiplication tables by the end of the year. So I went to my favorite 4th grade teacher and asked what her expectation was for multiplication in the fall. She said they need to know up to 12 x 12 by heart. Really? Then why isn't your colleague across the hall teaching it? The 4th grade teacher told me that she can always tell who the kids have had from k-3 because of where their "gaps" are. Some teachers stress reading by sight instead of phonetics, so when they are no longer teaching reading in 4th grade (it changes from "learning to read" to "reading to learn"), the kids who cannot sound out words they don't know fall off the radar from learning more advanced material if they are not adventurous or ask for help. She mentioned that some of the kids come in not knowing multiplication...can't move on to division so those kids have to back track for the first 6-10 weeks. Some teachers know that kids are sponges in the early grades and do lots of memorization work like states/capitals, US history dates, the Constitution, etc. At the end of 3rd grade they had not studied ANY history except the holiday stuff like pilgrims (with no real explanation) and there ha been no geography. Our daughter didn't have much of that and we realized every year was widening the gap. And she was a gifted student.

So we pulled her out, started with multiplication tables, moved on to states/capitals, did a geography program called Mapping the World in 180 Days (major rivers, mountains, countries), worked on spelling through Latin and Greek roots, studied Latin and French, required a report on a different president every week (also helped build up report-writing skills of which she had none...no sentence structure/parts of speech skills, no coherent paragraphs let alone a 5 paragraph paper)...this is what Washoe County schools lack. When we realized she was never going to get these things in school it just made sense to homeschool full time since we were going to have to teach it anyway.

For the most part we followed the Core Curriculum by a guy named Hirsch, The Well Trained Mind, and The Educated Child. We pulled lists of the 100 best books to read off websites, bought all the Caldecott and Newbery award books, traveled often to San Francisco museums, explored the outdoors...and I'm pretty sure she is a well-rounded, inquisitive, and productive university student. Although she is now 21 and just accepted to grad school (so some may say things in WCSD might have changed over the years), not so much. I hear the parents in my neighborhood complaining about the same things we did, and now have the extra burden of constant budget cuts due to a bad economy. Much of the WCSD woes are due to their funding matrix...property taxes and sales tax...both go down in a bad economy.

I wish anyone with kids in the district the very best of luck. But looking towards fledging my nestling this summer into the real adult world, I can only encourage parents to really work with their kids on the foundation skills because they are not going to get them in school.
The elementary class issues were the biggest motivator for us moving our DD to Coral - Coral has the benefit of being able to excel, if the kids can't keep up they don't last. Coral was a great environment for kids to be challenged and be above the bar, that was our experience. We too enriched our kids, I called it brain candy but as a whole, folks in N. NV did not seem to see enrichment (beyond sports) as being worth their time, efforts and funds.

My DS is graduating from UNR is 35 days and has been accepted into a Doctorate of Physical Therapy program, he got a decent education at UNR and is entering into an excellent grad program. He attended a lackluster under performing high school in N. NV, he did not even have the edge of a Galena or a Manogue. His Freshman year of college was eye opening for all of us, he struggled and then he sorted it out. I believe he was fortunate in that he has a brain and parents behind him helping, encouraging and pushing. His success is due to his hard work and the help of a handful of great teachers over the years but not because he was enrolled in an outstanding school district. WCSD has some great people, but they also have some real duds
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Old 04-27-2013, 06:59 PM
 
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Pretty much any county NOT in Nevada.
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Old 04-28-2013, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Sierraville
211 posts, read 269,274 times
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Last time I looked into it, any high school graduate in Nevada was accepted into UNR, even those totally unprepared, which accounts for the high freshman dropout rate.

Remember to, that how your child does in school is really up to you. The school has the child between kindergarten and graduation from high school, about 15% of the time.

Students that excel do so because of their parents, conversely, students that don't do well, don't do well because of lack of parent involvement.

Now, the above statements are general statements. There are exceptions.

The problem with schools today is NCLB, the need to perform well on multiple choice tests pretty much destroys quality education. Research Blooms taxonomy, you will see that the testing done under the NCLB mandate tests lower level think, basic knowledge, but not higher level thinking, the kind of thinking successful college students need.
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Old 05-11-2013, 08:42 PM
 
440 posts, read 878,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierravillian View Post
Last time I looked into it, any high school graduate in Nevada was accepted into UNR, even those totally unprepared, which accounts for the high freshman dropout rate.

Remember to, that how your child does in school is really up to you. The school has the child between kindergarten and graduation from high school, about 15% of the time.

Students that excel do so because of their parents, conversely, students that don't do well, don't do well because of lack of parent involvement.

Now, the above statements are general statements. There are exceptions.

The problem with schools today is NCLB, the need to perform well on multiple choice tests pretty much destroys quality education. Research Blooms taxonomy, you will see that the testing done under the NCLB mandate tests lower level think, basic knowledge, but not higher level thinking, the kind of thinking successful college students need.
You have to recognize UNR has a lot of people who are working adults attending there. That was one of the things I loved about it as a mid-career changer; there were many people in my age bracket who attended.

It's not like many universities in the country in that respect.
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Old 05-11-2013, 08:49 PM
 
440 posts, read 878,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamacatnv View Post
My DS graduated from a Washoe County High School (WCSD) in 2008 and my DD went to WCSD public schools for 1st to 3rd grade and from 4th to 7th grade she attended a charter school. The Charter is technically a WCSD school but it was far above the mainstream schools in its academic standards.

My overall impression of WCSD is not great, the district is huge and can't seem to hold onto a superintendant. Throughout my kid's school careers we saw a lot of administrators and teachers come and go. WCSD in my opinion can't seem to find a groove that works and so every few years they change things up. Then there are all the whining and moaning regarding budgets. Principals to the best of my knowledge are paid depending on the level of education they have not whether or not they are actually any good at their job.

We had some wonderful teachers through the years and some bad ones. I am now in Texas and I can really see the difference in the standards, seeing what I see here in TX I must say that NV has low standards. I have nothing to back this up with, this is just my observation as a parent. I can also say that the charter school my DD was in was excellent with a very high academic standard and little tolerance for behavioral issues, but they were allowed to not be tolerant, the same cannot be said for the average public school.

I think WCSD has to deal with a very mixed demographic and so much emphasis is put on bringing the low kids up to the mediocre bar that there are few resources remaining for the higher kids to actually be able to excel.
Education in general does not seem to be anyones priority at the state funding level and the over paid lackluster administrators moaning about lack of funding gets old really fast.
The principals there are terrible by and large, but when they screw up they wind up in the central office. They are protected to the hilt while teachers who have no family connections to the district (the district still engages in a lot of nepotism in hiring for the few jobs that are available after interdistrict transfers) are easily run out. Not a good working environment.

Nevada is still in the economic doldrums. I cannot understand why anybody would want to move there unless they are planning to retire.

I lived there for many years and enjoyed it for the most part, but the economy has just wrecked that state.
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Old 05-11-2013, 08:51 PM
 
440 posts, read 878,845 times
Reputation: 579
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamacatnv View Post
The elementary class issues were the biggest motivator for us moving our DD to Coral - Coral has the benefit of being able to excel, if the kids can't keep up they don't last. Coral was a great environment for kids to be challenged and be above the bar, that was our experience. We too enriched our kids, I called it brain candy but as a whole, folks in N. NV did not seem to see enrichment (beyond sports) as being worth their time, efforts and funds.

My DS is graduating from UNR is 35 days and has been accepted into a Doctorate of Physical Therapy program, he got a decent education at UNR and is entering into an excellent grad program. He attended a lackluster under performing high school in N. NV, he did not even have the edge of a Galena or a Manogue. His Freshman year of college was eye opening for all of us, he struggled and then he sorted it out. I believe he was fortunate in that he has a brain and parents behind him helping, encouraging and pushing. His success is due to his hard work and the help of a handful of great teachers over the years but not because he was enrolled in an outstanding school district. WCSD has some great people, but they also have some real duds
Of course Coral does because they get to pick who attends. It and the other charter scammers in Reno aren't public schools although they rip off taxpayers.

I have a very low opinion of charters.
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Old 05-12-2013, 07:05 AM
 
1,058 posts, read 1,782,998 times
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Originally Posted by tonysam View Post
Of course Coral does because they get to pick who attends. It and the other charter scammers in Reno aren't public schools although they rip off taxpayers.

I have a very low opinion of charters.
I have a very high opinion of Coral because we experienced it first hand. They don't get to pick who attends, its open enrollment or via a lottery but if a kid can't keep up or is a behavior problem they don't stay. Honestly, after dealing with so much dysfunction in the public school, the ability to actually put our child in a school that had the resources to help and encourage them to excel was welcome and we supported the school any way we could. Not all charters are good, but Coral is well rated and has an excellent reputation.

I agree that many of the charters are horrible but Coral is not one of them.
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Old 07-21-2013, 03:00 PM
 
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This website allows visitors to look at the school performance ratings year by year. Easy to use, too.

NSPF - Home
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