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Old 07-31-2014, 09:22 PM
 
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How bad is the drought in the Reno area? We have been thinking about moving to Reno but afraid the reported water shortage will not be good. Suppose we bought a house and the drought got worse and home values go down? We are concerned.

I know it is worse in California.
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Old 07-31-2014, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
30,893 posts, read 13,434,612 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by utahperson View Post
How bad is the drought in the Reno area? We have been thinking about moving to Reno but afraid the reported water shortage will not be good. Suppose we bought a house and the drought got worse and home values go down? We are concerned.

I know it is worse in California.
Yes, there is a drought in Reno too, it's just that people here don't talk about it much. It's funny it seems like around here people figure if you don't talk about a problem, like having the lowest rated schools in the US or a drought then it isn't really happening. I'm not sure it will impact housing prices, at least not any more than it would in California and it looks like housing prices there are steadily increasing.

Deepening drought threatens Nevada's very way of life
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Old 08-01-2014, 01:30 PM
 
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I've been here almost 30 years and 2 droughts in the past. So you can only water your lawns on certain days/ certain times...or the water police will leave a ticket on your door and turn the sprinklers off for you. You can't wash your car and leave the water running on the driveway, need to use a shut off valve on the hose. Water will not automatically be placed on tables at restaurants but the staff will be happy to serve all you want if you just ask. The river will be low enough that the water park on the river and fishing in most places will be non-existent.
Home prices? not so much. You move to the desert and you expect there will be drought after a few years of low snow pack. We replaced all of our landscaping 25 years ago with waer-wise landscaping...not all rock but lots of plants that can exist with little water. Many of our neighbors have done the same. The cost of water is increasing steadily so it would be a wise choice if you end up with a house surrounded by lawn. We have a part of the yard that needs to be rehabbed this fall and are even considering artificial turf. It has come a long way in the last 10 years.
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Old 08-01-2014, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
23 posts, read 37,725 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by utsci View Post
I've been here almost 30 years and 2 droughts in the past. So you can only water your lawns on certain days/ certain times...or the water police will leave a ticket on your door and turn the sprinklers off for you. You can't wash your car and leave the water running on the driveway, need to use a shut off valve on the hose. Water will not automatically be placed on tables at restaurants but the staff will be happy to serve all you want if you just ask. The river will be low enough that the water park on the river and fishing in most places will be non-existent.
Home prices? not so much. You move to the desert and you expect there will be drought after a few years of low snow pack. We replaced all of our landscaping 25 years ago with waer-wise landscaping...not all rock but lots of plants that can exist with little water. Many of our neighbors have done the same. The cost of water is increasing steadily so it would be a wise choice if you end up with a house surrounded by lawn. We have a part of the yard that needs to be rehabbed this fall and are even considering artificial turf. It has come a long way in the last 10 years.
Interesting that you mentioned that. I live in a town home community here in Pennsylvania where I have a postage stamp for a lawn. It takes me less than 10 minutes to mow the lawn. 15 if you include weed whacking. We purposely ripped out our front lawn and put down rock, cactus and a small tree. No grass. I am of the belief that if you need a lawn tractor to cut your lawn, it's too big. Needless to say, I hate mowing. To that end, when we move there it's is my hope to go "zero scape" or as much as possible with local flora/plants/shrubbery that doesn't require much maintenance.
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Old 08-03-2014, 03:34 PM
 
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Honestly, I just moved here, but if I'd had my druthers, we wouldn't be here now or ever. All of these desert states are facing water shortages which will become critical (and already are critical in some places) relatively soon.

This is a desert. It is a desert because there is a lack of water/rain. It is already over-populated given the climate and terrain. Aquifers are already overburdened. It will only get worse as time passes and the population - already too high for the area - continues to increase.

I am deeply concerned about the future in this and similar areas. Housing prices rising at the moment does not reflect the realities of the region. They will when they plummet, however.

Unless you have an overwhelming reason for coming here - such as no other job opportunities - this isn't a good place to relocate to, and if you must - find a way to get back out of the desert as soon as you may.

I don't think people out here take the lack of water nearly seriously enough. You can tell that from the number of mega-lawns all over the place. At least every second house doesn't come with an Olympic size pool, LOL!
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Old 08-06-2014, 03:57 PM
 
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Bad. They are having to tap resevoirs that they have not needed for decades. The flow to the Truckee River has been cut to the minimum and a bunch of the irrigation ditches around town have been shut down. They are asking people to cut back on watering. They have had to cut water to farmers in Fernley and Fallon 60%. It is only going to get worse as Reno is still growing. On the same line, Reno is pumping its own wells pretty hard and a lot of people who relied on private wells in the past are finding their wells go dry. They either have to dig a new one for $10,000-30,000 or hook up to the city water lines. Buying land is a risk because you must make sure some water rights come from it or all you bought was a piece of desert.
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Old 08-06-2014, 11:30 PM
 
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I've been here 30 years, this is my third drought. It runs in cycles. I realize global warming will shorten these cycles. But it does cycle. Just wait til everyone is complaining about a winter when it seems to snow every week. The ski resorts and hotels will be raking in the bucks and the reservoirs will fill up in the Spring. Anyone who lives in Spanish Springs or Double Diamond will not be able to go out at dusk and dawn due to living in relative swampland here as the mosquitoes will be killer in those years. I've seen cattle up to their knees in water more than once in Double Diamond; those retention ponds are nothing! I've helped friends at the south end of town clean rivers of mud out of their homes due to flooding. I have filled my fair share of sandbags over the years. I watched the flood of '97 as all of downtown was more than knee-deep in water. And in turn, I have reduced my water usage during three droughts now. It cycles.

Yes, we've seen the farmers downstream without irrigation several times in the past. They are irrigating a desert! There is not always going to be water available. D-E-S-E-R-T! The reservoirs sole creation and existence is to provide water during droughts. It is the back up plan. So yes, we are tapping the reservoirs during a drought. That's why they're there! And yes, I have friends on property with private wells that have had to drill deeper. But those were shallow wells to begin with. They knew when they bought those homes that they would have to drill new wells at some point and planned it into the cost of the property.

Right now the Reno area is in a very slow growth phase. There are plenty of empty homes and plenty of land with water rights that have been turned over so that the contractors can build homes there. It would help immensely if we were as foward thinking as Las Vegas and encourage water-wise landscaping and pay people to remove lawns. We need to be trading out for low flow shower heads and toilets. Learn to turn off your lawn sprinklers for the week if it rains, like it did for the past two days. On my drive to work ech day I saw plenty of sprinklers running in the rain. What a waste!

If you live in a desert, then there will be droughts.

noun
a region so arid because of little rainfall that it supports only sparse and widely spaced vegetation or no vegetation at all

Just sayin'
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Old 08-07-2014, 05:50 AM
 
Location: WA
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utsci, thanks for the information.

If I could ask (we're fairly new here) -- by Double Diamond, do you mean the area where Double Diamond Parkway and South Meadows Parkway cross?
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Old 08-07-2014, 09:27 AM
 
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All of Double Diamond (and a bit of history, put 2 diamonds next to each other and they represent the initials of Wilbur May the original rancher and Double Diamond was his ranch brand M on top of W) was originally a cattle ranch and almost all of the property was a pasture. There were irrigation ditches running through it but it existed mainly by rainfall and snow run off. When I moved here in 1984 it was completely ranch land. I think they started building in the '90's and just a few years ago the building at the south end and the north end met in the middle. If you want to know more about Wilbur May fot to Rancho SanRafael. They have a museum of his personal items.

So, that being said, it's was a successful natural pasture and collects the snow and rain runoff. In the planning stages the developers talked all about these retention ponds that would collect the water in heavy snow/rain years. I'm not so sure. We have friends whose DD home is on a slab and it cracked many years ago within a year of the house being built. They were told that the soil beneath was unstable and fixing the crack was futile as it would happen again.

You may also have noticed that people have difficulty growing trees in Double Diamond. The property has naturally high amounts of boron and salinity in the soil. The county extension office has a list of trees that will grow in Double Diamond more successfully than others. Give up your hopes for an oak tree.

I wish I had taken a picture of the ranch each year that I have lived here. The growth has been amazing. It was beautiful as a ranch. But I think they have done a fairly good job with planning for parks, schools, fire station, walking trails, etc. The developers agreed to the open space rules in return for putting homes on smaller lots.
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Old 08-07-2014, 09:36 AM
 
Location: WA
588 posts, read 957,796 times
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Thanks -- nice to have the history, and some information about building.

I'm still trying to figure out where Double Diamond is -- is it the area where Double Diamond (Parkway) crosses South Meadows Parkway -- or am I way off?
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