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Old 04-17-2015, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
30,902 posts, read 13,468,757 times
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this sounds pretty dire. I hope the HOA I used to live in takes notice and gets rid of some of those lush green lawns in the common areas. Drought cuts flow from Boca, river to drop
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Old 04-17-2015, 06:04 PM
 
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......and what irks me is the fact that there are still plenty of users billed on a flat monthly rate.
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Old 04-17-2015, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
30,902 posts, read 13,468,757 times
Reputation: 22019
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hotfeet View Post
......and what irks me is the fact that there are still plenty of users billed on a flat monthly rate.
I didn't know that, it's the same here in Sacramento, in fact we are flat rate but we are really conscious of our water use, everything is on drip and we have no lawn except a very small area in the backyard for the dogs to roll around on and we are thinking of putting fake grass there instead.
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Old 04-18-2015, 11:26 AM
 
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We still have a few neighbors on flat rate. They are not big users, just refuse to "let big brother tell us how much we can use." They are mostly elderly and retired. And since they are elderly they did away with the front lawn years ago, just keeping a nice patio and small lawn in the back for the most part. Most of them tend to hand water as their sprinkler systems went unrepaired years ago. They pay quite a bit more on flat rate than I ever do on metered. Just sayin'.

First let me say that we are not on an HOA. We live on 0.5 acres in a nice suburban, almost rural area. Our front yard has been xeriscaped for over 20 years, on a drip, no lawn. We were the first ones, and almost the only ones in the neighborhood, to have no front lawn. It is due for a major rehab, maybe next year. In the meanwhile, I don't want to encourage the overgrown stuff so I don't turn the drip system on very often, just enough to keep it from dieing. The mature trees and other "bones" of the landscape seem to survive just fine on some hand watering once per month. The backyard is also on the list. We haven't had a lawn for a long time back there. The original lawn was more weeds than grass about 10 years ago and the original sprinkler system was poorly engineered so we quit watering it. I hate the dirt that blows on windy days and we do have to spend some time mowing or killing the weeds every few weeks. We have some starter trees in the back that require watering. During the hottest, driest part of the summer we put a hose on a really slow dribble and move it from tree to tree every 24 hours. We were going to do a small lawn and sandy/ beachy firepit area. Now we've decided on artificial turf for the lawn area instead, so we're saving up for that, hopefully next year, as well. We have a few raised beds for vegetable gardening and I hope to put those and the trees on a drip system before they lay the turf. My goal is to have the yard on a low maintenance plan before we retire in a few years. Hmmmm...where have I heard that before?!! But in the interest of living on a fixed income I don't want to owe my pension to TMWA. So the front will remained xeriscaped, but even more hardscape than before, on a drip system that is more efficient than the old one. The back will have an artificial turf area, about 8 trees when we are all done, raised bed planters on one edge, and a sandy firepit area for relaxing on those beautiful desert nights. Our dogs have a 10' x 10' sand pit for their business already. I had heard that artificial turf can be too hot for animals to walk on in the summer heat. And since we lost all of our mature trees out back in the windstorm in February, they will be without significant shade for a while. Having very little shade for a while is another good reason for artificial turf. Real grass would never make it facing due south. We also have a large patio on the back of the house that we shade with a layer of landscape fabric over the pergola to keep it as cool as possible, which lowers our AC bill. We usually only need AC when we've had more than a few days in a row of triple digit temps and warmer nights. Otherwise we open up to capture the cool night air and then close the windows and pull all the drapes during the day to keep the cool in. Works like a charm! A bit cave-like during the day, but we've learned to accept it and work on some hobbies, read, or some other quiet activity during the hot afternoons if we happen to be home. We have a programmable thermostat that never budges off 68 during the summer unless we have guests over. I don't want to owe my pension to NV Energy either!

We realized when we moved here in 1985 that water would be a huge issue here eventually. It has taken longer than we thought to be a problem. The last few years has given us some delay since not as many homes were being built. But I would really like to see TMWA work on a program to encourage homeowners to ditch their lawns. Homeowners in Las Vegas are paid per square foot of lawn they convert to xeriscape. And we need to stop building homes with sprawling lawns (kids need something to play on so I'm all in favor of a small lawn in the back and keep our parks looking good) and reward homeowners who choose to replace lawn with xeriscape. It's not cheap to put in artificial turf and get new trees started, even if they are drought tolerant species.

Personally, I would rather see water in Lake Tahoe and the river, rather than paying for it in my back yard.
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Old 06-01-2015, 02:25 PM
 
524 posts, read 587,076 times
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Don't know about NV, but in CA 80% of water is used by the farmers. So it really does not matter how city people uses their water. So start charging them the same price city people pay per cubic feet, then we will know who is lying. Please stop asking city people subsidizing farmers so they can export cheap nuts/olive... to China. We should sell Chinese expensive Almonds, not the other way around.
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Old 06-01-2015, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Living rent free in your head
30,902 posts, read 13,468,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k81689 View Post
Don't know about NV, but in CA 80% of water is used by the farmers. So it really does not matter how city people uses their water. So start charging them the same price city people pay per cubic feet, then we will know who is lying. Please stop asking city people subsidizing farmers so they can export cheap nuts/olive... to China. We should sell Chinese expensive Almonds, not the other way around.
It does matter how city people use water, it matters how everyone uses water. But I don't disagree with the rest of your post, but the problem in California is complex, much of it has to do with the fact that California never regulated the use of groundwater so there are corporate farms that are sucking all the water out of the aquifer, if it collapses the state is screwed. They just passed legislation regarding the use of groundwater but agribusiness lobbied hard and the entire law doesn't even take effect for 20 or 30 years. It makes me crazy that the central valley is full of oligarchs growing almonds and pistachios in a desert, but what are you going to do, make a law that they can't grow them? Many of them have senior water rights and the government has no authority to take those rights away from them. None of that makes me happy, but I'm not sure how thrilled I would be if the government just jumped in and started taking over private property either
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Old 06-03-2015, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Henderson, NV
5,314 posts, read 6,292,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
It does matter how city people use water, it matters how everyone uses water. But I don't disagree with the rest of your post, but the problem in California is complex, much of it has to do with the fact that California never regulated the use of groundwater so there are corporate farms that are sucking all the water out of the aquifer, if it collapses the state is screwed. They just passed legislation regarding the use of groundwater but agribusiness lobbied hard and the entire law doesn't even take effect for 20 or 30 years. It makes me crazy that the central valley is full of oligarchs growing almonds and pistachios in a desert, but what are you going to do, make a law that they can't grow them? Many of them have senior water rights and the government has no authority to take those rights away from them. None of that makes me happy, but I'm not sure how thrilled I would be if the government just jumped in and started taking over private property either
We have this discussion on the LV forum all the time, normally when the gloom and doomers talk about LV running out of water.

You mention farmers with senior water rights that the government can't take away. Are the farmers paying for this water? If so, I'm assuming they are paying the government. Wouldn't raising the prices by 100x work, or are the prices fixed?

It seems to me that the easiest way to lessen the effects of the drought would be to raise the price of water, so people use less. I was shocked at how cheap water was in the middle of the desert when we moved here.
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Old 06-03-2015, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Reno
843 posts, read 1,831,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raiderman View Post
...
It seems to me that the easiest way to lessen the effects of the drought would be to raise the price of water, so people use less. I was shocked at how cheap water was in the middle of the desert when we moved here.
Don't bring economic realities into the statist wet dream of fines/laws and monopolies.
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