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Old 04-20-2017, 10:05 PM
 
1,190 posts, read 572,377 times
Reputation: 1010

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
You can't find a rental in SF for $2200, but if not then they need to move to the bay area. My son lives in a one bedroom duplex in downtown Martinez and pays $1040 a month, it would be perfectly adequate for two adults.

And $70,000 is NOT poverty level in San Francisco. Here is some 2017 data which breaks down what it costs to live in San Francisco and they make the case that a living wage for two adults is $52,436.

It's preposterous to claim that two adults can't live on 2K a month AFTER paying rent and utilities, my God there are plenty of people who don't make 2K a month - they are the ones we should be giving section 8 vouchers to

And NO one in the world should ever advocate for giving two able bodied adults a section 8 voucher because one of them "might" get laid off.
I am too lazy to check but in this thread, I've posted the poverty level for S.F.

I am positive it is much higher than 52K.

I agree that as he secures and succeeds his job, he might be able to move to the bay area.

I wouldn't want to live in S.F. for anything
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Old 04-20-2017, 10:32 PM
 
Location: la la land
27,230 posts, read 11,375,700 times
Reputation: 19290
Quote:
Originally Posted by NancyDrew1 View Post
I am too lazy to check but in this thread, I've posted the poverty level for S.F.
I am positive it is much higher than 52K.
I agree that as he secures and succeeds his job, he might be able to move to the bay area.
I wouldn't want to live in S.F. for anything
I linked you data for 2017, it looked accurate to me, and I did the math in an earlier post, with $2200 a month rent they have a very nice 2K left over for other living expenses on their 70k salary. And if he needs to, he can move to the bay area right now take BART just like tens of thousands of other people do.

HUD housing money is not a bottomless pit, that's why section 8 lists only usually open once every few years. The last time I read the stats on it, there are only enough vouchers available to house 24% of the VERY poor. I've worked with poor people who have been on Section 8 lists for a decade, and while they are waiting for their voucher most of them are sofa surfing or living 3 or 4 people in a studio apartment. I'm usually very compassionate, but I'm not feeling it for this couple
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Old 04-20-2017, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Talmadge, San Diego, CA
12,973 posts, read 24,027,061 times
Reputation: 7687
The OP apparently lives in Houston, TX. Here are the Section 8 income limits for the State of Texas.

http://section-8-housing-income-limi....com/d/d/Texas
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Old 04-21-2017, 12:12 AM
 
Location: New York
1,486 posts, read 1,399,600 times
Reputation: 1821
Quote:
Originally Posted by moved View Post
The OP apparently lives in Houston, TX. Here are the Section 8 income limits for the State of Texas.

http://section-8-housing-income-limi....com/d/d/Texas

Op live in San Francisco. Read post 51 on this thread.
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Old 04-21-2017, 01:06 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,731,344 times
Reputation: 8928
Quote:
Originally Posted by NancyDrew1 View Post
I am too lazy to check but in this thread, I've posted the poverty level for S.F.

I am positive it is much higher than 52K.

I agree that as he secures and succeeds his job, he might be able to move to the bay area.

I wouldn't want to live in S.F. for anything

There is ONE "poverty level" for the entire continental US, it is $11,880 for one person and $24,300 for a family of four.

Section 8 eligibility goes up to 50% of local metro Median Family Income which varies locally.

In SF that is $55,350 for a family of four.
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Old 04-21-2017, 01:14 AM
 
33,046 posts, read 20,731,344 times
Reputation: 8928
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
I linked you data for 2017, it looked accurate to me, and I did the math in an earlier post, with $2200 a month rent they have a very nice 2K left over for other living expenses on their 70k salary. And if he needs to, he can move to the bay area right now take BART just like tens of thousands of other people do.

HUD housing money is not a bottomless pit, that's why section 8 lists only usually open once every few years. The last time I read the stats on it, there are only enough vouchers available to house 24% of the VERY poor. I've worked with poor people who have been on Section 8 lists for a decade, and while they are waiting for their voucher most of them are sofa surfing or living 3 or 4 people in a studio apartment. I'm usually very compassionate, but I'm not feeling it for this couple

No Section 8 vouchers will be distributed in Portland this year, so the timetable for opening the waiting list is pushed back a year.

Because unsubsidized rents are so high, getting a Section 8 subsidy frees up a lot of money which is then spent on previous luxuries like food.
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Old 04-21-2017, 03:00 AM
 
11,635 posts, read 5,477,332 times
Reputation: 11029
Quote:
Originally Posted by neoiey View Post
I live in the Bay area. 2 bedroom apartment is +$2200/month.

If you think that I am more fortunate than you then just move to the Bay area and you will know how wealthy you are with $70,000/year - taxes - $26400(rent).
No one said wealthy but certainly not in need of welfare housing.
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Old 04-21-2017, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Talmadge, San Diego, CA
12,973 posts, read 24,027,061 times
Reputation: 7687
Quote:
Originally Posted by reenzz View Post
Op live in San Francisco. Read post 51 on this thread.
I went by the zip code on their profile. So here's the information for SFO, but it's from 2015, 2017 isn't online. http://section-8-housing-income-limi...Metro-FMR-Area
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Old 08-07-2017, 08:40 PM
 
85 posts, read 109,953 times
Reputation: 52
There you go
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Old 08-07-2017, 09:18 PM
 
3,853 posts, read 1,598,734 times
Reputation: 2622
Quote:
Originally Posted by neoiey View Post
I live in the Bay area. 2 bedroom apartment is +$2200/month.

If you think that I am more fortunate than you then just move to the Bay area and you will know how wealthy you are with $70,000/year - taxes - $26400(rent).
Where in the Bay Area are 2 beds 'only' $2,200/month? I have a 1 bed in Oakland and I would rent it out for $2,300-2,400/month. Brand new 1 beds are over $3,000/month. Maybe this thread is old. I didn't look at the posting date.
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