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Old 04-08-2009, 03:26 PM
 
1 posts, read 4,695 times
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I have been a tenant in my building in Chicago for 12 years. Having lost a job in January I was not going to sign a new lease that begins on May 1st, 2009. I got a new job and thought it would be safe to sign a new lease in Feb. One week later that new job didn't work out. I notified my building owner on April 4th that I would not be staying after all. Because I signed a new lease they are trying to get 4 months rent from me to terminate early. It's part of a rider that I signed. Question being, the new lease has not started yet, I will be out by the end of the April which is the end of my current lease. Can they still come after me for breaking a lease that hasn't started yet??
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Old 04-08-2009, 04:05 PM
 
850 posts, read 2,813,593 times
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The contract becomes effective the date both parties sign it, regardless of what the lease dates are. You signed a contract to live at "xyz address" for a term of 12 months. You also signed a rider acknowledging early termination fees. Now you're terminating early. So yes, you're responsible for those fees. (I always recommend checking your state laws to be sure, but this is typically how it goes.)
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Old 04-15-2009, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Maryland
1,668 posts, read 5,467,965 times
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That's about it. Sorry, but a contract is binding and can only be amended or cancelled with another written contract. In other words, the landlord couldn't legally "cancel" your contract, even if he wanted to.
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