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Old 08-12-2009, 01:12 PM
YAZ YAZ started this thread
 
Location: Phoenix,AZ
6,147 posts, read 6,653,814 times
Reputation: 4413

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sco View Post
Only a scumbag would lie to the police in order to unlawfully enter a tenant's home. You should consider yourself lucky that they only caused some minor damage to the house and didn't sue you and press charges for criminal trespass. You knew what the legal process was for dealing with unpaid rent and chose not to follow it. If you try to sue them or collect for these damages, I think that you would quickly find yourself in a lot of trouble when a judge found out what you did.
No lieing involved, followed everything by the book. Nothing illegal whatsoever.

Lawsuit is filed, court date is set for next week. Tenants have been notified and served. I'll bet dollars to donuts that they don't show up.

Name calling is more indicative of the speaker's mentality than the listener's, BTW.

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Old 06-07-2010, 09:27 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,188 times
Reputation: 10
I have six rental properites for three years now. Filth, people screaming at you, people leaving after a week. Very few times did I ever have a month when I just collected and no problems/ Right now I am going thru a renter who was the nicest person when I met them after 4 months of them being ther the last three weeks they turned on me out of nowhere. I call them with details of there deposit and they hang up on me I have done nothing wrong accept give them a place to live when they were desperate. I really think my husband and I will go in the land contract business much easier if you think about it.
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Old 06-07-2010, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Pelion, South Carolina/orig. from Cape May, NJ
1,115 posts, read 2,215,521 times
Reputation: 1087
My advice? Next time, rent to a person on Section 8/rental assistance.

I can hear the gasps now.

Listen. When you rent to someone on Sec. 8, YOU GET YOUR RENT EVERY MONTH. No chasing people down for your money because Section 8 pays you directly. The program also requires an inspection of the unit before it's rented, and every year afterward. If it fails inspection, either the LL or the tenant must make repairs within a certain time. If the repairs aren't done, the LL won't get their rent, and the tenant will lose their Section 8. So it protects everyone from 1) slumlords who don't give a crap about their properties/tenants, and 2) tenants who wreck properties. It also protects tenants from landlords who claim the place was wrecked when it wasn't.

BTW, it is illegal for landlords to refuse to rent to Section 8 tenants.
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Old 06-07-2010, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Pelion, South Carolina/orig. from Cape May, NJ
1,115 posts, read 2,215,521 times
Reputation: 1087
Quote:
This caught my eye. How long are those things supposed to last? The landlord of the house from which I just moved wants me to pay for the window blinds that he installed new four and a half years ago. They are the cheapest you can buy, and I didn't do anything odd to them except open and close them, but over the past few months they started to bend and not always open and close the right way. I feel as though I was being nickel-and-dimed over this.
I had (past tense) those same cheapie blinds in our rental, too. (They're the venecian-blind type)
They lasted about 6 months. When I saw how much they cost at Wal-Mart ($5) I thought to myself, no wonder they fell apart.
I wish landlords would spend a little more and not always buy the "cheapies" to put in their rentals.
Like carpeting: why do they always install the cheap, flat, all-one-color (usually beige) stuff? Then they wonder why it wears out and stains so easily.
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Old 06-07-2010, 11:13 PM
 
1,465 posts, read 2,774,724 times
Reputation: 792
Quote:
Originally Posted by jersgrl1969 View Post
My advice? Next time, rent to a person on Section 8/rental assistance.

I can hear the gasps now.

Listen. When you rent to someone on Sec. 8, YOU GET YOUR RENT EVERY MONTH. No chasing people down for your money because Section 8 pays you directly. The program also requires an inspection of the unit before it's rented, and every year afterward. If it fails inspection, either the LL or the tenant must make repairs within a certain time. If the repairs aren't done, the LL won't get their rent, and the tenant will lose their Section 8. So it protects everyone from 1) slumlords who don't give a crap about their properties/tenants, and 2) tenants who wreck properties. It also protects tenants from landlords who claim the place was wrecked when it wasn't.

BTW, it is illegal for landlords to refuse to rent to Section 8 tenants.
In California, you can refuse to rent to Section 8 tenants. (it probably is everywhere, I only know CA law) A while back, not only did the government guarantee the payments they would pay to have any tenant damage fixed. I don't see how the government can force you to take a Section 8 tenant without that guarantee.
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Old 06-08-2010, 07:08 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
22,136 posts, read 26,279,267 times
Reputation: 22720
Quote:
Originally Posted by jersgrl1969 View Post
My advice? Next time, rent to a person on Section 8/rental assistance.

I can hear the gasps now.

Listen. When you rent to someone on Sec. 8, YOU GET YOUR RENT EVERY MONTH. No chasing people down for your money because Section 8 pays you directly. The program also requires an inspection of the unit before it's rented, and every year afterward. If it fails inspection, either the LL or the tenant must make repairs within a certain time. If the repairs aren't done, the LL won't get their rent, and the tenant will lose their Section 8. So it protects everyone from 1) slumlords who don't give a crap about their properties/tenants, and 2) tenants who wreck properties. It also protects tenants from landlords who claim the place was wrecked when it wasn't.

BTW, it is illegal for landlords to refuse to rent to Section 8 tenants.
Incorrect that LLs cannot refuse Section 8 tenants. And although Section 8 pays the grander amount of the rent, the tenant is still usually responsible for a portion. A recent poster documented her very long problem with a Section 8 tenant who failed to pay her share and the very messy business which ended up in court.
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Old 06-08-2010, 05:09 PM
 
Location: Boise, ID
5,468 posts, read 10,626,082 times
Reputation: 4855
It is possibly illegal to refuse to rent to a tenant BECAUSE they are section 8 (although I don't think so), but it is definitely legal to refuse to cooperate with the section 8 program.

In other words, maybe you can't turn someone down because they are on section 8, but you can refuse to accept the terms Section 8 offers, which has the same effect.

Section 8 requires the property to have an inspection before a tenant moves in, and for anything that doesn't meet their standards (which may or may not be according to code) to be upgraded or fixed. As long as it isn't a code violation, you don't have to agree, which has the effect of not allowing a Section 8 tenant. And that doesn't automatically equal slumlord. We've had brand new (nice) houses, built to code (or better), that Section 8 wanted more stuff done, like a smoke detector in every bedroom.

Also, Section 8 puts limits not only on how much THEY will pay for the tenant, but also on how much TOTAL rent is allowed to be charged. Many landlords aren't willing to cooperate with those limits, and they have every right to do so. We've had Section 8 tell us that we couldn't raise the rent on a tenant, even though it was a market rate.
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Old 06-08-2010, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Spokane via Sydney,Australia
6,608 posts, read 6,874,117 times
Reputation: 2979
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicet4 View Post
The second renter. As horrible as the first one was good.

Constantly late with rent it felt creepy to have to drive 100 miles round trip every month in an attempt to collect rent.

So I get a letter telling me they would vacate July 31.

On August 4 I went to the house with video camera in hand and the real estate agent I used to rent it. I just had this feeling.

Every window on the first floor was broken out.

Garbage everywhere. Unbelievable.

Back door screen kicked in and when they left they took all the light bulbs with them. It wasn't the light bulbs it was the idea.

In the garage was this huge pile of belongings. Clothes in boxes mostly and they looked like good clothes. It appeared they were clothes for an entire family.

I called a trash pickup service and they came the next morning taking everything to the landfill. I paid the bill and got the receipt.

The next day I get a telephone call from the husband screaming and yelling about how I stole all their clothes. He was livid. Told me about a toy train set that was his dads and he really wanted that back. I told him everything went to the landfill.

I told him to call my attorney.

His attorney called mine who sent a copy of the video tape showing the damage with the voice of the realtor who rented it to them making comments in the background. That was the end of that.

But there was one thing I didn't have thrown away.

It's a complete 1948 Lionel train set with everything still in the original boxes. This set is pristine. I even got the barrel car and all the barrels are still with it which is practically unheard of.

Seeing as how it cost me more than $2,000 (this was 1984 dollars) to repair everything I didn't feel the least bit guilty.

On top of that they stiffed me for the last month rent.
So you don't have a problem with stealing and lying to an ex tenant?

Regardless of what you feel your justification was, two wrongs don't make a right.
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Old 06-08-2010, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Pelion, South Carolina/orig. from Cape May, NJ
1,115 posts, read 2,215,521 times
Reputation: 1087
Quote:
Originally Posted by STT Resident View Post
Incorrect that LLs cannot refuse Section 8 tenants. And although Section 8 pays the grander amount of the rent, the tenant is still usually responsible for a portion. A recent poster documented her very long problem with a Section 8 tenant who failed to pay her share and the very messy business which ended up in court.

I equate a LL telling someone on Section 8 "I don't take Section 8" to them telling someone 'I don't rent to blacks" or "I don't rent to gays".
Sounds like plain ol' discrimination to me.
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Old 06-08-2010, 11:56 PM
 
Location: Boise, ID
5,468 posts, read 10,626,082 times
Reputation: 4855
Quote:
Originally Posted by jersgrl1969 View Post
I equate a LL telling someone on Section 8 "I don't take Section 8" to them telling someone 'I don't rent to blacks" or "I don't rent to gays".
Sounds like plain ol' discrimination to me.
Of course it is discrimination, but it is perfectly legal discrimination. It is also discrimination to say that:

I won't allow 27 people to occupy my 2 bedroom house, or
I won't allow anyone with pit bulls because my insurance would drop me, or
I won't allow anyone with a credit score of under 600 or
I won't allow anyone who has been evicted in the past.

These are all legal forms of discrimination. If it isn't covered under a protected class, it is legal discrimination.

What you are asking for is actually reverse discrimination. If a landlord has policies in place that a certain credit score is required, and a certain amount of income is required relative to the rent, then by saying "If you are on Section 8, I MUST waive those requirements" (because people on Section 8 by definition don't have that kind of income) "and not only that, but I have to do x,y and z repairs/updates to your unit before they'll start giving me the rent, AND if I want to raise the rent to market value, I have to request it and see if it gets approved, but if it doesn't, since I can't turn you down, then I have to just take whatever Section 8 will give me", that is reverse discrimination. That is forcing a LL to give special treatment to one group of people.
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