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Old 12-18-2009, 08:11 PM
 
64 posts, read 146,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdean890 View Post
Hi everyone,


I came home and the carpet (its Berber) was literally torn and ripped up from the floor like he tried digging out! He's done this several times even when he's in his crate (he'll kick out the pan of the crate and dig...).
What I don't get is why did you leave the dog locked loose in a room if you knew he was already trying to tar up the carpet being crated? If he barks when he's locked up and it bothers your neighbors take him on a 1 mile run before crating him (you're young, you can do it), of give him toys, food, etc.....If all of that doesn't work than there are shock collars, and vet prescribed calming medications. You are lucky he didn't eat anything that required surgery. Crates are safer for dogs with destructive separation anxiety. Not only are they protecting your apartment, but they protect your dog.

And a big NO, on the baby gate idea. It won't save your dog from taring up everything in your room, AND he could still chew through it (if plastic or wood) and/or jump over it.
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Old 12-18-2009, 11:36 PM
 
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I worded that wrong, that was the first time he did anything to the carpet when I left him out. After that I always put him in his crate but he found a way to get to the carpet even in his crate. He has plenty of toys in there and like I said, he gets A LOT of play and running in everyday. He hasn't done anything like that in about 8 weeks. But thank you for the advice on shock collars. How do those work?
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Old 12-19-2009, 12:50 AM
 
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Oh please don't use a shock collar. They are really cruel. They deliver an electric volt to your puppy in a very sensitive area--their neck--whenever their vocal cords strain through barking. Puppies especially are often so terrified by the shock that they yelp, which causes them to be shocked again, and they yelp again, and they get shocked again and again and again. The collars usually come with several voltage strengths but they are based on an adult dog's body size. A puppy may not have the physical stamina to survive shocks, let alone repeated shocks. The shocks don't enforce positive behavior, they only reinforce terror and fear. Positive training like crate training is far more effective and humane. You made the choice to get a dog, keep it in a small home, and leave it alone all day. Don't punish the puppy for your choices. It sounds like the crate training is going very well. Keep it up, and invest in some other positive-reinforcement training if you need to.

As for the carpet--did he actually tear the carpet, or just pull it up? That is, has part of the pile been torn out, or has the backing been torn? If it is just lifted up from its tacking strip, you can easily have someone come in and stretch it back over the tack strip.
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Old 12-19-2009, 05:50 AM
 
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I never knew that about shock collars (I thought they just gave them a jolt or something, he is pretty much full grown though). Usually I or my roommate are home unless I'm in class which is why the situation was so frustrating because I wouldn't be able to leave without him barking or chewing, the times he;s left alone are relatively short (3-4 hours at the most) and I don't even work...since then he's calmed down a lot and doesn't do either because I think I've been pretty consistent with the crate training and Bitter Apple for barking.

As for the carpet, its actually torn, I'm not lucky enough for it to just be lifted off the tack strip.
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Old 12-19-2009, 06:14 AM
 
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I agree walk your dog at least 45 min every morning before you leave........get up 45 min early.....you wanted the dog now do what you should do...I rented to a guy that painted his walls black....enamal no deposit is enough for what I had to do to get that off. Berber at Lowe's is around $7.00 a yard replace it or replace a section,Berber cant be "fixed"
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Old 12-19-2009, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
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I'd wait until right before you move out and either get the carpet replaced with a similar grade and close match in color or present your landlord with 2-3 estimates accompanied with carpet samples. Keep a sample of the damaged carpet as well. This will keep the repair within accurate bounds.

Your goal is to leave the apartment in the same shape as when you rented it--less the usual wear and tear. If the carpets were clean, undamaged, and not smelly when you rented, that's the way you need to return the premises when you vacate.

If the walls were cleanly painted and not chipped and marked, that's the way you need the walls to be when you vacate.

The two dogs may do further damage in accidents or tearing up the carpet while you live there--no sense replacing the carpet more than once. Let's hope there's no damage to what's underneath the carpet--such as hardwood floors.

Your landlord does know you have two dogs in your apt.? Have you paid a pet damage deposit?
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Old 12-19-2009, 08:01 PM
 
64 posts, read 146,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kodaka View Post
Oh please don't use a shock collar. They are really cruel. They deliver an electric volt to your puppy in a very sensitive area--their neck--whenever their vocal cords strain through barking. Puppies especially are often so terrified by the shock that they yelp, which causes them to be shocked again, and they yelp again, and they get shocked again and again and again. The collars usually come with several voltage strengths but they are based on an adult dog's body size. A puppy may not have the physical stamina to survive shocks, let alone repeated shocks. The shocks don't enforce positive behavior, they only reinforce terror and fear. Positive training like crate training is far more effective and humane. You made the choice to get a dog, keep it in a small home, and leave it alone all day. Don't punish the puppy for your choices. It sounds like the crate training is going very well. Keep it up, and invest in some other positive-reinforcement training if you need to.
He doesn't have a puppy. No, shock collars are not positive reinforcement. They are negative reinforcement, but none the less they ARE reinforcement. If he is already walking/running his dog 45 minutes every time before putting him into his crate, giving him toys to play with, and even getting a prescriptive calming medication for him and the dog is still bouncing off the walls than YES a shock collar should be used as a last resort. It is more humane than letting an destructive anxiety-ridden dog free in a room where he will damage the property and possibly ingest something that could require surgery to remove.

But they are a last resort. If the OP is not walking him for 45 minutes before putting him in his crate (every time), not giving him toys, and not seeking the consultation of a vet then he should do those things BEFORE trying a shock collar.
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Old 12-19-2009, 08:11 PM
 
64 posts, read 146,756 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mdean890 View Post
I never knew that about shock collars (I thought they just gave them a jolt or something, he is pretty much full grown though). .
Shock collars are not as damaging or emotionally scarring at some people would have you believe. Dogs grab each other by the neck as a form of communicating that they want the opposing dog to "knock it off." Prong collars mimick that, but shock collars are a set up from that. Same idea, different method.

Before ever using one of these collars on your dog, try it out on your leg, on the highest setting. If you can't handle it, don't put it on the dog. Yes, they give more of a "jolt" than an equivalent to sticking your finger into a power outlet, as some would have you believe.

Used correctly, and sparingly, they are a way to break the toughest of dogs out of very bad habits that would otherwise need to be re-homed or endanger their lives in some way.
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Old 12-19-2009, 11:08 PM
 
509 posts, read 1,031,214 times
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We used a shock collar on our dog for barking, it worked well and we did try it out on ourselves first. After a few times we set it to the "beep only" setting. Now it just makes a little noise when she barks rather than giving a static shock. Effective for barking, but not for carpet-tearing I'm afraid, which sounds like it is a bigger problem. To keep the dog from tearing carpet while in the crate, I would suggest going to the hardware store and buying a sheet of plywood to put on the floor, then put the crate on the center of the plywood.
As far as the damage to the apt, I would replace the carpet in the room where the dog tore it up right before you move, and also repaint the walls that have been painted & do a thorough cleaning. Shampoo all of the other carpets, scrub every nook and cranny, and especially fix any doggie damage. We live in a rental where we are blessed enough to be allowed to have our dog. When we leave here (hopefully not for a very, very long time) we will leave the place spotless & fix any damage (we've been very lucky- our dog is has good behaviour, so no damage done in the two + years that we've had her). We'll also offer to help the landlord touch up/repair any of the normal/expected wear & tear & help him get the place in perfect shape for the next people to move in, even though that's not really a tenents' responsibility. It's next to impossible to find rentals that allow pets, so you want to leave the place in the best condition possible... don't give them any reason to ban pets in the future.
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