U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Halloween!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate > Renting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 02-05-2010, 05:44 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
740 posts, read 674,325 times
Reputation: 441
Default Rental application questions

Hi All,

I am moving back to the US after 4 years abroad (not sure where yet, I still have 1 week to pick which job I want) and have a few questions:

* I am going to rent at first and am a bit worried about how my overseas rental history is going to effect my ability to rent in the US when I give references. My current landlady likes me (she cried when I said I was leaving), but only speaks Turkish. Should I give the contact info of my neighbors who speak English? They are friends with my landlady so are going to be honest, but how would a potential landlord know that? My US rental history is good and can provide all but 1 landlord's info (deceased)

* Obviously I will not have been with my employer long when I am going to try to rent, but any employer I have will be about as a steady as you can get (government or university). Is this a giant negative or can it be resolved with a bigger deposit?

Aside from that (well that and the factor of having 2 50 lbs + dogs and a cat) I don't think I'd have any other issues. My credit is good (790+), if needed I can get a co-signor, me and the pets are quiet and boring etc

Does anyone foresee the top 2 issues being deal breakers? What kind of reaction/questions/concerns can I expect from potential landlords?
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-05-2010, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
2,638 posts, read 5,897,733 times
Reputation: 3331
Could you get a letter of recommendation from your current landlord? Perhaps your English-speaking neighbors could translate it for her.

As for your new employment I assume that would be considered relatively low risk. I think most LLs would accept a normal deposit from you since your credit is good.

Your biggest issue is probably going to be with the pets. Many LLs don't accept pets at all. Trying to find one that will accept 2 50lb dogs and a cat will not be easy. You may need to pay an additional deposit and fees for the pets. If you can get your current landlady to address your pets in the letter of recommendation that would be helpful as well.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2010, 07:54 AM
 
Location: St Thomas, US Virgin Islands
21,656 posts, read 25,242,745 times
Reputation: 22343
I wouldn't worry too much about it as a four year absence isn't that long a time at all where your credit history is concerned and you say you still have good stateside references. Good luck!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2010, 07:56 AM
 
1,492 posts, read 4,471,890 times
Reputation: 1281
If at all possible, network with friends/family/church/etc. You may get back stateside and discover you want to relocate somewhere else....if even the next town over....if you lock yourself into a lease- you may regret it!

This happened to me after returning to the states but luckily I rented month to month so when I moved 3 hours south- it wasn't a big deal.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2010, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
740 posts, read 674,325 times
Reputation: 441
Quote:
Originally Posted by tilli View Post
Could you get a letter of recommendation from your current landlord? Perhaps your English-speaking neighbors could translate it for her.

As for your new employment I assume that would be considered relatively low risk. I think most LLs would accept a normal deposit from you since your credit is good.

Your biggest issue is probably going to be with the pets. Many LLs don't accept pets at all. Trying to find one that will accept 2 50lb dogs and a cat will not be easy. You may need to pay an additional deposit and fees for the pets. If you can get your current landlady to address your pets in the letter of recommendation that would be helpful as well.
I am a bloody idiot! I can totally get a notarized translation of letter of reference with all the fancy official seals so the landlord knows I didn't just forge it. As for the pets, I know it is going to be hard and I am going to have to pay a steep, likely non-refundable, pet deposit. Ah well, they are worth it.

@Vegas Grace: I'll be in a specific place (wherever that is) for a job, so won't be moving anytime soon, but that is very good advice!

To all the LLs out there: What are your opinions of pet resumes? Useful? Just more papers for you to have to file? Also, would it be a plus if I had a monthly membership at a doggy day care, showing the dogs will not be in the house when I am at work? I'm going to do that anyway, but wanted to know if it is something you would care to see or not.

Thanks again everyone!!

Last edited by typhoidmary; 02-05-2010 at 08:53 AM.. Reason: As always, forgot a question
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2010, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Anchorage, AK
73 posts, read 163,135 times
Reputation: 61
As a landlord, my concerns with pets are that you are going to take care of them in the house and not let them destroy stuff and that you will pick up and dispose of their waste properly.

If you are going to use doggy day care while you are at work, that would be a major plus because then a landlord knows that your dogs aren't going to be in the house alone all day maybe destroying stuff or going to the bathroom in the house.

Another idea would be to get a letter from your vet saying that they are good well mannered dogs that are current on their shots and are spayed/neutered.

Other than that you can probably expect to pay an extra deposit for them.

Good luck!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2010, 02:56 AM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
740 posts, read 674,325 times
Reputation: 441
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluecielos View Post
As a landlord, my concerns with pets are that you are going to take care of them in the house and not let them destroy stuff and that you will pick up and dispose of their waste properly.

If you are going to use doggy day care while you are at work, that would be a major plus because then a landlord knows that your dogs aren't going to be in the house alone all day maybe destroying stuff or going to the bathroom in the house.

Another idea would be to get a letter from your vet saying that they are good well mannered dogs that are current on their shots and are spayed/neutered.

Other than that you can probably expect to pay an extra deposit for them.

Good luck!
Another item to take to get translated and notarized: vet records.

I expect to pay a big, non-refundable deposit for the fuzzy butts. Actually even if it was just the cat (who is 13 an has been mistaken for an inanimate object more than once) the landlord would have to do deep cleaning in case their next tenant has allergies. Fur is a ***** to get out of a carpet

I am definitely doing doggy day care since sometimes my work can run late and it is inhumane to expect my critters to "hold it" for 12+ hrs. Not to mention that if there is a failure then I have to clean it up I'll stick

So, Mr/Ms Blue (and/or any other landlord), as a landlord would you want a pet resume (which I find kind of goofy) or would talking to my LLs, vet history, letters from my dog trainers, doggy day care, a big deposit (I expect 3 months rent at least) and neighbors as references work for you? Anything else I should do?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2010, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Anchorage, AK
73 posts, read 163,135 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by typhoidmary View Post
Another item to take to get translated and notarized: vet records.

I expect to pay a big, non-refundable deposit for the fuzzy butts. Actually even if it was just the cat (who is 13 an has been mistaken for an inanimate object more than once) the landlord would have to do deep cleaning in case their next tenant has allergies. Fur is a ***** to get out of a carpet

I am definitely doing doggy day care since sometimes my work can run late and it is inhumane to expect my critters to "hold it" for 12+ hrs. Not to mention that if there is a failure then I have to clean it up I'll stick

So, Mr/Ms Blue (and/or any other landlord), as a landlord would you want a pet resume (which I find kind of goofy) or would talking to my LLs, vet history, letters from my dog trainers, doggy day care, a big deposit (I expect 3 months rent at least) and neighbors as references work for you? Anything else I should do?
I personally would be more than happy with the letters you plan to get. A pet resume would include all of that stuff anyways and would be a bit redundant.

I have prospective tenants fill out an application for themselves and I also have a pet application for them to fill out too. So far I haven't found a renter that has all the letters you talk about above. I think you will be ahead of the game.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2010, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
740 posts, read 674,325 times
Reputation: 441
Good to know! I am also a bit worried about the fact that I can not show local pay stubs or anything. I mean, I will have a job before I try to rent but doubt I will have a pay stub yet when I try to rent. I have 3 options for co-signors and wonder which is best:

* The folks: retired, paid off house, well off, but many credit cards but no debt that I know of and my dad bought a car recently
* The bro: works at google, more than well off, no debt, but is only 31
* The ex husband (yeah, odd he'd volunteer, but whatever): Is a fed so the landlord can garnish his wages easily. But the fact that he is my ex spouse might raise an eyebrow or 30....hell, even I think it is weird
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-06-2010, 09:54 PM
 
4,806 posts, read 11,615,673 times
Reputation: 4562
Rental history and rental references are usually two separate things on an application.

You provide the name of your landlord in the rental history. You can provide the names of the english-speaking neighbors if you wish, in the references section.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Real Estate > Renting
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top