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Old 06-14-2007, 03:40 PM
 
4 posts, read 154,967 times
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Default question about carpet replacement in rental house.

I'm just wondering what the general rule is for carpet replacement. We have rented a house for 8.5 years now. The carpet was new but we could tell it was old padding (missing in some spots) underneath and it was very basic carpet. That was fine, hey it's a rental. Now the carpet is faded by the sun in some spots and it fraying a little at the seam in the same area. We had an accident with the dog tearing at the carpet near the door just today. Would this mean that we would be responsible for replacing the carpet? Not sure where we stand at this point. Thanks for any info!

- House in in O.C., CA.

Last edited by dinah; 06-14-2007 at 05:03 PM..
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Old 06-14-2007, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Long Beach, CA
2,074 posts, read 7,951,227 times
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A landlord is not responsible for replacing the carpet - if it's torn (a trip hazzard,) they are responsible for repairing it (or replacing it if they choose). But you mentioned your dog ---- sounds like the dog caused the problem. BTW, I'm in LA county. Maybe OC is different.
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Old 06-15-2007, 07:46 AM
D_J
 
Location: Michigan
58 posts, read 432,316 times
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If the damage was done by a tennant then you should withhold the repair costs from their security deposit. Ultimately the replacement is up to the landlord to have done though.
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Old 06-15-2007, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Long Beach, CA
2,074 posts, read 7,951,227 times
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dinah,

Carpet life is 8 to 10 years. If you've been a good tenant, I don't see why a landlord wouldn't want to replace your carpet (it'a a better alternative than repairing). If you moved, it sounds like they would have to replace the carpet anyway. I like to keep my long-term tenants happy (or for that matter any tenants). I would talk to the landlord about the lack of padding in some areas, also the fading, which is not your problem or your responsibility ..... don't mention the dog. Maybe you can split the cost. I would prefer that he pays the total replacement, as it sounds like you need a replacement. Let me know how it works out

Paula
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Old 06-15-2007, 09:24 AM
 
1,773 posts, read 5,081,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dinah View Post
I'm just wondering what the general rule is for carpet replacement. We have rented a house for 8.5 years now. The carpet was new but we could tell it was old padding (missing in some spots) underneath and it was very basic carpet. That was fine, hey it's a rental. Now the carpet is faded by the sun in some spots and it fraying a little at the seam in the same area. We had an accident with the dog tearing at the carpet near the door just today. Would this mean that we would be responsible for replacing the carpet? Not sure where we stand at this point. Thanks for any info!
- House in in O.C., CA.
Having direct experience with this (rented one place for 11+ years) I can say in my situation upon moving we cleaned (steam-cleaned and spot removed) the carpet as with the rest of the house as thoroughly as possible. We got our security deposit back despite the carpets definitely needing replacement. The obvious truth is that the life a carpet in a rental situation is only about 10 years and landlords know this. I lived in another rental situation where the carpet was pretty abyssmal from the start, we just cleaned it and left after a year and once again had no problems.

The tear near the front door may be worth getting repaired. I suspect someone who knows what their doing can fix the rip just as carpet installers can make a seam invisible with the proper tools and techniques. I would recommend that you repair this right away (before it gets worse or trips somebody). Regarding the animal accidents or stains... try to clean those as much as possible. I learned with animals and kids one of the best ways to clean carpet stains... use a soil & spot stain remover spray to soak the stain and use a metal spoon (just a normal tablespoon) to rub out the stain (hold the spoon with bottom up and scrape the carpet vigorously with one side changing directions to be thorough - have a paper towl to collect the cleaner foam off the spoon while you work). This literally gets about 99% of the stains out of the carpet... and indeed the spoon technique does not wreck the carpet fibers but does allow you to deep clean them in stained areas.

If you show effort in cleaning up and repairing and damage you caused while living in the rental before moving your landlord will likely be appreciative. After 8 years, there is a certain level of wear and tear that is expected - landlords know this. I hope this helps.
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Old 06-16-2007, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Bridgeville,Pa
4,167 posts, read 6,730,084 times
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After 8 years as a landlord, I would replace it.
However, if your dog did the damage, I would replace it as a tenant.

By the way ; we had a tenant and after 6 months she had all the carpets replaced ; her kids and animals wrecked them.

Now 2 years later, she needs to replace them again.
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Old 06-18-2007, 11:59 AM
 
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Wow. Thank you all for your input. Very helpful. We are hopefully planning to move in the next year, so by that time it will be close to ten years for us being in the house. I think we will give the carpets a good steam cleaning along with wiping down the walls, filling holes (from pictures on the wall) and replacing all of the mini-blinds (I would rather spend the few bucks than trying to clean those suckers!) and hope for the best with our deposit. Thank you again for your help. Much appreciated
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Old 10-20-2007, 12:49 AM
 
Location: East Coast Personality. West Coast Flaire. Planted in Minneapolis / “MN Niceland"
1,164 posts, read 1,512,392 times
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Arrow Know all there is to know...

I would imagine every state has laws, regulations, or general guidelines as to what is acceptable in these cases. The average life of carpeting greatly depends upon the quality of the carpeting that was installed in your home - and it varies greatly.

In general higher end rentals are considered (I am in Minnesota) to have carpet life of 5 - 10 years. Most average apartments now-a-days have 5 year carpeting installed. The complex I live at now - while it appears to be lovely & such - installs carpeting that apparently has an average life of 3 - 5 years (I asked the carpet installers - as my carpet is brand new). They told me this is the lowest end carpeting that is made.

Why that matters is that, if the life of your carpeting is 10 years & you've lived there for 9 & ALL the carpeting needs to be replaced - NOT due to normal wear & tear - but to pet damage or excessive stains, etc - the landlord can you bill you for the prorated cost of the remainder of the life of the carpeting (1 year).

If the carpeting needs to be replaced & it is normal wear & tear - you pay nothing. Also, if there is just that one small area where the dog damaged it & everything else is normal wear & tear - you can only be billed for the prorated value of that replacement or repair area - not all of it.

It would be highly unlikely that, after all that time in the home, that you could be billed much of anything for the carpeting unless it was extremely expensive to begin with. If the carpeting is in generally good condition without terribly noticeable stains from spills or pets or dogs ripping holes, etc - the landlord would likely be hard pressed to get a judge to agree to award them much - if anything - for the remainder of the life of the carpeting.

As for fixing the tear yourself - if you have a closet that is carpeted that would likely closely match the level of wear in the doorway - a really good carpet layer can fix that like nothing. Years ago I had an iron but no ironing board & I laid a towel down on the floor to iron a blouse. It was very wrinkly so I really worked one spot. Long story short - it singed the carpeting BAD - & it was fairly new carpeting - the really cheap stuff - but fairly new. I thought they'd have to replace the entire bedroom carpeting at least because of it. I called the mgmt company to arrange to pay for it & get it taken care of. They told me not to worry they'd send someone out & it'd be good as new. Indeed, it was. They cut that spot out & glued in (or something) a new piece - in the middle of the friggin room almost - & I could NOT tell the difference - not even if they would of paid me to.

So, that's my long 50 cents worth - all the best to you...
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Old 10-20-2007, 03:50 PM
 
98 posts, read 238,688 times
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No matter what, you would never be liable for the full value of new carpet but the depreciated value and at 8.5 years that would be almost nothing.
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Old 10-22-2007, 10:52 AM
 
1,999 posts, read 5,171,531 times
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This was taken from the California Department of Consumer Affairs

2. Carpets and drapes - "useful life " rule
Normal wear and tear to carpets, drapes and other furnishings cannot be charged against a tenant's security deposit. 223 Normal wear and tear includes simple wearing down of carpet and drapes because of normal use or aging, and includes moderate dirt or spotting. In contrast, large rips or indelible stains justify a deduction from the tenant's security deposit for repairing the carpet or drapes, or replacing them if that is reasonably necessary.
One common method of calculating the deduction for replacement prorates the total cost of replacement so that the tenant pays only for the remaining useful life of the item that the tenant has damaged or destroyed. For example, suppose a tenant has damaged beyond repair an eight-year-old carpet that had a life expectancy of ten years, and that a replacement carpet of similar quality would cost $1,000. The landlord could properly charge only $200 for the two years' worth of life (use) that would have remained if the tenant had not damaged the carpet.
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