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Old 06-14-2010, 06:01 PM
 
23,901 posts, read 19,988,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by naeem5 View Post
for me to pay them the premium for the next 5 years would be a waste of money.
I'm not paying for medicare pat B now because I can not afford it, it does not pay enough of my medical expenses. My medical conditions are not covered.

I want to find a legal way to prevent them from forcing it on me at age 65. I can not afford to pay 25% of my retirement check for medicare part B.
Sounds like you need to consult and get some legal advice from a local attorney. Obviously your situation is complex with many variables and beyond the reach of simple forum discussion. Good luck.
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Old 06-14-2010, 06:16 PM
 
706 posts, read 1,154,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
Where is this thread going?
part of the question was that I think that the new health care reform bills made medicare part B mandatory for those age 65 and older.

Read here: look at the 2nd one....this is the one that would bite me. I'm eligible for medicare part B now at age 59. I'm not taking it and the last time I did it was $106 a month. This 10% penalty each year could raise my premium from $106 to much higher levels by age 65.
*Medicare patients cannot pay cash for care. A 1997 law (the Balanced Budget Act, section 4507) forbids private contracts between patients and doctors. With few exceptions, Medicare recipients cannot pay cash for a Medicare-covered service that Medicare denies.*Initially refusing to enroll in Medicare Part B leads to costly penalty. Seniors are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part B. Those who refuse and later change their minds pay higher premiums - 10 percent higher for EACH year they were not enrolled.17 Medicare Facts
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Old 06-14-2010, 06:32 PM
 
Location: not where you are
6,312 posts, read 3,289,768 times
Reputation: 4432
Oh, Ok, this is all about the health care reform bill. GOT IT!
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Old 06-14-2010, 07:04 PM
 
23,901 posts, read 19,988,856 times
Reputation: 5891
Quote:
Originally Posted by naeem5 View Post
part of the question was that I think that the new health care reform bills made medicare part B mandatory for those age 65 and older.

Read here: look at the 2nd one....this is the one that would bite me. I'm eligible for medicare part B now at age 59. I'm not taking it and the last time I did it was $106 a month. This 10% penalty each year could raise my premium from $106 to much higher levels by age 65.
*Medicare patients cannot pay cash for care. A 1997 law (the Balanced Budget Act, section 4507) forbids private contracts between patients and doctors. With few exceptions, Medicare recipients cannot pay cash for a Medicare-covered service that Medicare denies.*Initially refusing to enroll in Medicare Part B leads to costly penalty. Seniors are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part B. Those who refuse and later change their minds pay higher premiums - 10 percent higher for EACH year they were not enrolled.17 Medicare Facts
Consult an attorney. The bill is new and you will get opinion and rumor and since it is your future you want to get reliable information and not forum thought and rumors here, there or anywhere. Most folks here are not into the rumor mill and you might want if determined to raise it in a forum find one that is more controversial. We tend to be retirement practitioners sharing the enjoy of daily life.
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Old 06-15-2010, 11:10 AM
 
706 posts, read 1,154,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRosa View Post
Oh, Ok, this is all about the health care reform bill. GOT IT!
the bill was advertised as a way to get "every" American insured, like so many other countries, no matter their economic level, and the choice to opt out was not a part of it.

My own situation is unique since I am on disability and not able to afford Medicare Part B since it does not cover enough of my medical expenses to justify the cost per month for the insurance.

I'm doing the best I can with my income and these 10% penalties

that are there not only for me, but any senior who passes on part B,

can become a hardship. 10% for 5 years will be a 50% increase.
Only S.S. knows whether my medical conditions will have improved by my 2014 review. I read somewhere that S.S. must show strong evidence that there has been improvement and for someone to be taken off disability is not that easy. The burden of proof is on S.S. Some of my conditions are stable and others have deteriorated due to advancing age. I've got a disabililty lawyer and he will represent me at my review. What's done is done as far as my job history, which has made my social security benefit so low.

An insurance forum may have been better for my question but I saw "retirement" and assumed, wrongly I guess, that there are disabled retirees out there. I can only apologize for posting in the wrong forum.

Retirement can be something to enjoy for many, but the ones who have to live in poverty in retirement live a different life, many of them alone with no family.
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Old 06-15-2010, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
9,344 posts, read 7,307,324 times
Reputation: 16548
I do not think this is the wrong forum for the OP. All Medicare issues are basically retirement issues, even though many people are not retired yet when they hit age 65. By the time we are 65, we are all thinking about retirement issue to some extent, even if we are not retired yet.
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Old 06-15-2010, 05:40 PM
 
23,901 posts, read 19,988,856 times
Reputation: 5891
Quote:
Originally Posted by naeem5 View Post
part of the question was that I think that the new health care reform bills made medicare part B mandatory for those age 65 and older.

Read here: look at the 2nd one....this is the one that would bite me. I'm eligible for medicare part B now at age 59. I'm not taking it and the last time I did it was $106 a month. This 10% penalty each year could raise my premium from $106 to much higher levels by age 65.
*Medicare patients cannot pay cash for care. A 1997 law (the Balanced Budget Act, section 4507) forbids private contracts between patients and doctors. With few exceptions, Medicare recipients cannot pay cash for a Medicare-covered service that Medicare denies.*Initially refusing to enroll in Medicare Part B leads to costly penalty. Seniors are automatically enrolled in Medicare Part B. Those who refuse and later change their minds pay higher premiums - 10 percent higher for EACH year they were not enrolled.17 Medicare Facts
How is it a Medicare covered service if Medicare denies it?
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Old 06-15-2010, 05:41 PM
 
23,901 posts, read 19,988,856 times
Reputation: 5891
Quote:
Originally Posted by naeem5 View Post
the bill was advertised as a way to get "every" American insured, like so many other countries, no matter their economic level, and the choice to opt out was not a part of it.

My own situation is unique since I am on disability and not able to afford Medicare Part B since it does not cover enough of my medical expenses to justify the cost per month for the insurance.

I'm doing the best I can with my income and these 10% penalties

that are there not only for me, but any senior who passes on part B,

can become a hardship. 10% for 5 years will be a 50% increase.
Only S.S. knows whether my medical conditions will have improved by my 2014 review. I read somewhere that S.S. must show strong evidence that there has been improvement and for someone to be taken off disability is not that easy. The burden of proof is on S.S. Some of my conditions are stable and others have deteriorated due to advancing age. I've got a disabililty lawyer and he will represent me at my review. What's done is done as far as my job history, which has made my social security benefit so low.

An insurance forum may have been better for my question but I saw "retirement" and assumed, wrongly I guess, that there are disabled retirees out there. I can only apologize for posting in the wrong forum.

Retirement can be something to enjoy for many, but the ones who have to live in poverty in retirement live a different life, many of them alone with no family.
This isn't the wrong forum for the topic. I am only saying that your situation is unique and complex and you need professional opinions.
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Old 06-16-2010, 08:57 AM
 
706 posts, read 1,154,641 times
Reputation: 91
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
How is it a Medicare covered service if Medicare denies it?
that phrase in that article:
Medicare recipients cannot pay cash for a Medicare-covered service that Medicare denies.**

is not understood by me. Maybe someone else can interpret it.

-------

I did find this, and it can explain why Medicare part B can be so expensive.
There are the premiums, the deductables, the co-pays and the "co-insurance"

co-insurance:
Health care providers who have accepted “assignment” have agreed to limit their fee to the Medicare-approved amount for a service or supply, although you must still pay any deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments due.
>>>> Providers who do not accept Part B assignment may charge as much as 15 percent more than the Medicare-approved amount. You must pay the excess charge. <<<<
source: Medicare Supplement Insurance Handbook and Rate Guide from the Texas Department of Insurance

My specific medical expenses make it more financially feasible for me to just pay out of pocket. The 10% per year penalties will get me eventually and could be a hardship depending on what my retirement government check looks like.

My father never paid a dime fo drugs or medical. He had Medicare, then a supplement thru AARP and another insurance thru his employer.
After his death, we actually got 4-5 medical refund checks where his insurance companies had over paid or they had been over billed. The hospitals-doctors issued refunds to the estate.
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Old 06-16-2010, 09:57 AM
 
6,982 posts, read 16,658,655 times
Reputation: 6559
Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
How is it a Medicare covered service if Medicare denies it?
I'll give you an example.

I had an MRI done on my brain. This is a Medicare covered service. However, the claim was denied. The person handling the claim decided that the MRI was not needed and that an X-Ray would have done the same thing. (I agreed with Medicare. It was not needed) I was then billed for the entire amount.

I refused to pay because I had not been warned in advance that Medicare might not pay. The doctor had to write-off the entire cost.
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